Why are ignorant buffoons allowed to write columns for the Washington Post?

I ask this question only because I happened upon a historically inaccurate piece, written by John Kelly, who is, by trade, a columnist for the Washington Post. His latest piece expresses shock, shock I say, that Generals Jackson and Lee are honored as Christian soldiers at the National Cathedral

On Wednesday, mourners will gather at Washington National Cathedral to celebrate the legacy of Nelson Mandela, a man who fought for racial equality. I’m guessing most of them will have no idea they’re sitting in a place that has shrines to two people who fought against it.

I certainly know I was surprised when I learned recently that two memorial niches — complete with stained-glass windows and laudatory inscriptions — honor Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson.

Well, I am unsure where the notion that Jackson and Lee were “against” racial equality. At least any more than Saint Lincoln did. His thoughts on the inferiority of the Black race are well documented. Not that Lincoln was alone in those thoughts in the mid 19th Century. But more to the point about Jackson and Lee and their views on race. Jackson ran a school in Lexington, Virginia educating Blacks, Historian Richard William’s book on this school is a must read for those who, like Kelly, are historically clueless. Here is a link to a stories about Jackson and Lee that Kelly should also read especially this part

One Sunday in June of 1865, just after the war ended, St. Paul’s Episcopal, was packed with folks leaning on each other and God for understanding about what their future held. But they could never have imagined what would happen during the service.

When the pastor began to serve communion, a well-dressed black man came forward first.

It would be an understatement to say that the event caused a few awkward moments among the white congregants. They remained seated, except one man who went forward and knelt near him.

That man was General Robert E. Lee

The general’s actions come as no surprise to noted Civil War historian James Robertson, who says Lee was a man of duty and faith.

“His duty was to his native state, both in war and in peace,” Robertson, a history professor at Virginia Tech, said. “His faith was very deep-seated. And I think Lee was simply exhibiting both. He knew that the South had been crushed, defeated, humiliated. He knew he had a duty to himself, to his God to help reconstruct his beloved Virginia as much as he could.”

The rest of the congregation followed Lee’s example and took communion as well.

Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend?

But it’s a stained glass window that represents one of the greatest ironies of the Civil War. The window honors another prominent Confederate general: Stonewall Jackson.

The window is not in a museum. It’s proudly displayed in the predominantly black Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke, Va.

The church’s founding pastor Rev. Lylburn Downing designed the window in 1906 to honor Jackson for leading his parents to faith in Christ when they were slave children.

Prior to the Civil War, Jackson was a professor at the Virginia Military Institute, and a deacon at the Lexington Presbyterian Church.

In 1855, the man who would become one of the Civil War’s most famous generals, began a Sunday school class for black children, slave and free.

Downing’s father and mother were among his many students.

“As he saw it, slavery was something that God ordained upon black people in America for God’s own reasons,” Robertson said. “And he had no right to challenge God’s will. That was blasphemy. And so, while he hated slavery, he was opposed to slavery, Jackson had to obey his Heavenly Father and accept the system. And he accepted it through doing the Golden Rule, do unto others as he would wish they do unto him.”

Professor Miller believes Jackson’s justification of slavery on biblical grounds was wrong.

“Yet in the midst of all of that, I think that people can do good stuff, maybe for all the wrong reasons, but motivated by sincere hearts,” he said.

That sincerity is confirmed by the fact that Jackson was willing to break Virginia law by teaching the class. Even after the war began, Jackson sent money back to the church to keep the class going.

Richard Williams has documented Jackson’s ministry in a book called, Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend.

He says the Sunday school class had a generational impact.

” a number of scholars, as Jackson referred to his students, that went on to become ministers,” Williams said. “There were four churches established, three in Lexington and then this one. Two of those churches in Lexington are still vibrant ministries today.”

And when a statue at Jackson’s gravesite in Lexington was erected in 1891, it was one of Jackson’s scholars-turned-pastor who made the first contribution.

How do the members of Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church feel about a stained glass window honoring a Confederate general?

Freeland Pendleton, who’s been a member of the church most of his life, says he has no problem with it.

“The reason I was okay with it because he had the courage to teach us, teach blacks to read and write,” Pendleton said. “Whether he was fighting for slavery, or whatever, he did do a good thing.”

You can go read the rest of Kelly’s column, it is sad, very sad, that someone would choose to write a column on subject’s he knows little about.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s