Ed’s NCAA Football Week 4 Picks – 10 Best Games



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Thursday, September 18

7:30 PM – Auburn at Kansas State

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Saturday, September 20

12:00 PM – Georgia Tech at Virginia Tech
3:30 PM – Florida at Alabama
3:30 PM – North Carolina at East Carolina
7:00 PM – Mississippi State at LSU
7:00 PM – Northern Illinois at Arkansas
7:30 PM – Oklahoma at West Virginia
8:00 PM – Clemson at Florida State
8:00 PM – Miami (FL) at Nebraska
10:30 PM – San Diego State at Oregon State

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Week 1 Results: 7 Wins – 3 Losses
Week 2 Results: 8 Wins – 2 Losses
Week 3 Results: 8 Wins – 2 Losses

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The Daley Gator Videos Site Has A New Address!


………..DaleyGatorVideos.altervista.org

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*VIDEO* David Berlinski – Another Brilliant Man You’ve Never Heard Of, Unless You’re Ed


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Another Day, Another Riot (Edward L. Daley)


In a press briefing today, President Asshat Obama said he “understands the passions and the anger that arise over the death of Michael Brown.” I suppose if you’re a racist dirtbag, you’d be angry about somebody who happens to have the same skin color as you getting shot by a cop with different skin color. Then again, if you’re a normal, decent American, you’d probably react like I have to the information made available thus far, which is to not judge the case until all the facts are made known. So, like our glorious leader, I too understand the passions and anger of the rioting cretins in Ferguson; they’re lawless parasites who automatically assume the cops are at fault whenever a black guy is shot dead by a police officer.

Obama also stated that his Justice Department – headed by the most corrupt, racist Attorney General in modern history – has opened a civil rights investigation into the incident. What he doesn’t explain is why he finds it necessary to open any sort of federal investigation into a police shooting where no evidence of wrongdoing on the part of the officer involved has yet to be revealed.

Let’s take a look at what we actually KNOW happened, not what we think may have happened.

1. On August 9, 2014, Michael Brown and his friend Dorian Johnson were caught on surveillance video apparently stealing cigars from a convenience store in Ferguson, Missouri a short while before being confronted on the street by police officer Darren Wilson.

2. Michael Brown was an intimidating figure of a man who was over 6’4″ tall and weighed nearly 300 pounds.

3. Officer Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown.

4. Michael Brown had the cigars he allegedly stole on his person when he was killed.

5. A preliminary, private autopsy performed by Dr. Michael Baden – former forensic medical examiner for the New York State Police – found that Michael Brown was shot four times in the right arm and twice in the head.

6. The fatal shot entered through the top of Michael Brown’s head, suggesting that he was bent over when the shot was fired.

7. All the shots came from the front.

8. Michael Brown had marijuana in his system when he was shot.

So, is it possible that the officer in question shot Michael Brown just because he doesn’t like black people? Sure, but it’s also just as likely that the shooting was completely justified, or that it was unjustified but not racially motivated. The fact is we don’t know what happened in this case, and until more evidence comes to light, it is irresponsible for anyone to be speculating about it, or calling for investigations by any entity other than the Ferguson Police Department.

As for the people currently plundering the town of Ferguson, don’t think for a minute that they’re doing so simply to make a political or social point about poor, innocent Michael Brown. No, they’re also doing it because they’re crooks, and crooks are always looking for an excuse to take things that aren’t theirs and destroy other things just for the fun of it.

Trust me on this, normal, law-abiding people don’t go on violent rampages no matter how morally outraged they may claim to be. Only criminals do that.

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Study: Half Of American Public School Employees Are Non-Teachers

Maybe Johnny Can’t Read Because These Workers Crowd Out Teachers – Daily Signal

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Half of America’s public school employees aren’t classroom teachers, according to a new study. Instead, they’re non-teaching personnel such as instructional aides, bus drivers, cafeteria workers, secretaries, and librarians.

It hasn’t always been this way.

The study from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a nonprofit think tank specializing in education policy, found that the number of non-teaching staff grew by 130 percent from 1970 to 2010. Their salaries and benefits account for one-quarter of current education spending.

To show where each state is on the spectrum between least and most non-teaching personnel per 1,000 students, Fordham created this map:

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So why are non-teachers on the rise? The Fordham Institute left that up to school district and state education officials to explain.

By using national, state, and local data, though, “The Hidden Half: School Employees Who Don’t Teach” attempts to draw attention to what some education experts consider an alarming trend.

By a wide margin, Nevada and South Carolina public schools had the fewest non-teaching workers per 1,000 students, at 26 and 28 respectively, the study found. Virginia, Vermont, and Wyoming had the most at 104, as the chart below shows.

Lindsey Burke, the Will Skillman Fellow in education policy at The Heritage Foundation, argues for reducing the number of non-instructional and administrative positions in public schools:

States should consider cutting costs in areas that are long overdue for reform and pursue systemic reform to improve student achievement. Specifically, states should refrain from continuing to increase the number of non-teaching staff in public schools.

Michael Petrilli, president of the Fordham Institute, told The Daily Signal that the results of the study should encourage policymakers to “raise tough questions about whether these trends are helping or hurting children.”

Among the most significant findings of “The Hidden Half’,” the authors say in a release on the study:

Since 1950, school staffing has increased nearly 500 percent, and non-teaching personnel played a major part in that growth. Passage of several pieces of federal legislation – Section 504, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, and Title IX (Equal Opportunity in Education Act) – likely were instrumental in changing the makeup of schools.

America spends far more on non-teaching staff (as a percentage of education spending) than do most of the nation’s economic peers in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The U.S. spends more than double what Korea, Mexico, Finland, Portugal, Ireland, Luxembourg, Austria, and Spain do. Only Denmark spends more.

States vary in staffing their schools, but much of the variation is because of differences within their borders. States with a large proportion of the population living in cities tend to have fewer workers per student. (See chart below.)

The category of teacher aides has been the largest gainer over the past 40 years. From 1970 to 2010, aides went from nearly non-existent to the largest group of workers other than teachers.

School districts vary greatly in number of employees, but the differences likely stem from staffing decisions made by leaders. Although factors such as location (rural, suburban, urban) and number of students in special education matter, they don’t explain most of the variation across school districts.

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The ‘DALEY GATOR VIDEOS’ Website Is Now Online!


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CLICK ME!

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Statist Disaster Update: Hundreds Of Thousands Of VA Electronic Disability Claims Go Unprocessed

Hundreds Of Thousands Of VA Electronic Disability Claims Not Processed – Nextgov

Hundreds of thousands of disability claims filed with the Department of Veterans Affairs’ eBenefits portal launched in February 2013 are incomplete and could start to expire this month, Nextgov has learned.

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VA Undersecretary for Benefits Allison Hickey touted the new portal in June 2013 as simple as filing taxes online and a way to whittle down the claims backlog.

“Veterans can now file their claims online through eBenefits like they might do their taxes online,” she said, including the documentation needed for a fully developed claim in cooperation with Veterans Service Organizations, or VSOs, such as the American Legion or Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Gerald Manar, deputy director of the National Veterans Service at VFW, told Nextgov the Veterans Benefits Administration on June 26 briefed VSOs on problems with the eBenefits portal, including the fact that only 72,000 claims filed through eBenefits have been completed and approved since last June, with another 228,000 incomplete.

VA spokeswoman Meagan Lutz said since February 2013, just over 445,000 online applications have been initiated. Of those, approximately 70,000 compensation claims have been submitted and another 70,000 nonrating (add a dependent, etc.) have been submitted, leaving a total of 300,000 incomplete claims. Because a number of claims started are more than 365 days old, they have now expired, totaling an estimated 230,000 unprocessed claims.

Manar said he still is trying to understand why so many vets did not complete their online claims and whether they opted to file a paper claim. Lutz said an important element of the electronic claim submission process is the ability for veterans to start a claim online with limited information to hold a date of claim, while simultaneously providing 365 days to collect data, treatment records and other related information.

Lutz said a veteran simply hits “save” and any information provided is saved in temporary tables. During that 365-day period, a veteran may add additional data or upload documents associated with that specific claim. At any point during that timeframe, a veteran can hit the “submit” button and a claim will be automatically established within the Veterans Benefits Management System, designed to entirely automate claims processing by next year, and documents will be uploaded to the veteran’s e-folder.

Claims submitted in eBenefits may be incomplete because “many users can potentially start a claim as part of their exploration of the system… The VA eBenefits team has no way of actually knowing which claims that might be started within eBenefits are valid and or have been abandoned for any number of reasons

After 365 days, Lutz said, the data is made inaccessible and the initiated claim date is removed from the system. The system was designed to provide the veteran as much flexibility as possible in preserving that start date as well as support the Fully Developed Claim initiative, which gives the veteran the opportunity to accrue additional benefits for providing all the data needed to rate the claim.

Lutz said if vets try to submit electronically hundreds of documents, such as PDFs of medical records, “that volume of documents makes electronic submission very difficult, and we always recommend that they work with a Veterans Service Organization, as the VSOs have the expertise to ensure that the right information is gathered and submitted.”

VSOs have little visibility into the claims filed to date through the eBenefits portal because of design problems with the information technology system set up, the Stakeholder Enterprise Portal, Manar said. That portal only allows for broad searches for claims at the state and the VBA regional office level, and limits any search to 1,000 claims. If the search results in more than 1,000 records, SEP returns a message that the system is not available, rather than the search went over the 1,000 file limit, Manar said.

SEP is also not set up to notify VSOs when a claim is filed through eBenefits, nor does it provide alerts when claims are due to expire, Manar said and urged VA to fix SEP to provide such notifications.

SEP, Manar said, was not “well thought-out” when fielded and “the whole system was not ready for prime time.”

Lutz said VA SEP design team is working as quickly as possible to help VSOs to review more than 1,000 files in SEP without getting an incorrect error message.

She said VA plans a new release of SEP this month to VSOs, which will allow VSOs to submit claims directly to VBMS for veterans who hold power of attorney. This update would eliminate the need for the veteran to submit from the eBenefits portal.

“This, we believe, will be a major milestone in the VSO community that will accelerate acceptance of the electronic process,” Lutz said.

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