Global Warming Update: Cold Temperatures Set Record As Snow Arrives In Chicago

Cold Temps Set Record As Snow Arrives In Chicago – WMAQ

.
…………

.
Looks like Mother Nature isn’t going to let Chicago forget that winter is coming.

The city saw light snow Saturday morning, marking one of the earliest snow sightings on record.

The earliest snow spotting in Chicago is Sept. 25, which occurred in 1928 and again in 1944, according to the National Weather Service.

Saturday’s snowflakes mark the third earliest snow sighting since the city began recording.

The Rockford area also spotted snow Saturday morning, marking their second earliest sighting. The record was set in 1951 when the area saw snow on Oct. 3.

But the snow wasn’t the only weather element the Chicago area made the record books with this weekend.

The city set a temperature record with O’Hare Airport recording a high of 47 degrees, marking the lowest maximum high temperature in 79 years, the NWS reported. The previous record, set on October 4, 1935, was 48 degrees.

The average high temperature in Chicago for the month of October is 62 degrees. The average low temperature is about 43 degrees.

Blame Saturday’s cold snap on winds from the west-north-west brought in by a system that dropped significant rain on the Chicago area early Friday morning.

We’re in the range of calendar days when we could see our first fall freeze.

Winds Saturday morning kept frost away from the area despite the snow, but with temps dipping into the 30s overnight and very little wind forecast, the area could see pieces of patchy frost. Temperatures could dip below 32 degrees in some areas.

A Frost Advisory was issued Saturday night for several Illinois counties and parts of Northwest Indiana.

The earliest a fall freeze ever happened in Chicago was on Sept. 22, 1995. The latest that’s ever happened was the 30 degrees reached on Nov. 24, 1931, according to records provided by the National Weather Service.

Sunday looks to recover slightly with partly sunny skies and a high of 56 degrees.

The city will return to near-normal temperatures at the start of the work week with highs forecast in the low- to mid-60s for much of the week.

.

.

The Daley Gator Videos Site: 129 Vids And Counting (Videos)



………..DaleyGatorVideos.altervista.org

…..Just a little taste of what you’ll find at the Daley Gator Videos site:

PAT CONDELL: LAUGHING AT THE NEW INQUISITION

.
MONTY PYTHON’S FLYING CIRCUS: MINISTRY OF SILLY WALKS SKETCH

.
DR. PAUL VITZ: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF ATHEISM (PART 1)

.

Scientists At Salk Institute Discover On/Off Switch For Aging Cells

Scientists Discover An On/Off Switch For Aging Cells – Salk News

Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered an on-and-off “switch” in cells that may hold the key to healthy aging. This switch points to a way to encourage healthy cells to keep dividing and generating, for example, new lung or liver tissue, even in old age.

In our bodies, newly divided cells constantly replenish lungs, skin, liver and other organs. However, most human cells cannot divide indefinitely – with each division, a cellular timekeeper at the ends of chromosomes shortens. When this timekeeper, called a telomere, becomes too short, cells can no longer divide, causing organs and tissues to degenerate, as often happens in old age. But there is a way around this countdown: some cells produce an enzyme called telomerase, which rebuilds telomeres and allows cells to divide indefinitely.

In a new study published September 19th in the journal Genes and Development, scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered that telomerase, even when present, can be turned off.

.

……………………….Victoria Lundblad and Timothy Tucey

.
“Previous studies had suggested that once assembled, telomerase is available whenever it is needed,” says senior author Vicki Lundblad, professor and holder of Salk’s Ralph S. and Becky O’Connor Chair. “We were surprised to discover instead that telomerase has what is in essence an ‘off’ switch, whereby it disassembles.”

Understanding how this “off” switch can be manipulated – thereby slowing down the telomere shortening process – could lead to treatments for diseases of aging (for example, regenerating vital organs later in life).

Lundblad and first author and graduate student Timothy Tucey conducted their studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same yeast used to make wine and bread. Previously, Lundblad’s group used this simple single-celled organism to reveal numerous insights about telomerase and lay the groundwork for guiding similar findings in human cells.

“We wanted to be able to study each component of the telomerase complex but that turned out to not be a simple task,” Tucey said. Tucey developed a strategy that allowed him to observe each component during cell growth and division at very high resolution, leading to an unanticipated set of discoveries into how–and when–this telomere-dedicated machine puts itself together.

Every time a cell divides, its entire genome must be duplicated. While this duplication is going on, Tucey discovered that telomerase sits poised as a “preassembly” complex, missing a critical molecular subunit. But when the genome has been fully duplicated, the missing subunit joins its companions to form a complete, fully active telomerase complex, at which point telomerase can replenish the ends of eroding chromosomes and ensure robust cell division.

Surprisingly, however, Tucey and Lundblad showed that immediately after the full telomerase complex has been assembled, it rapidly disassembles to form an inactive “disassembly” complex – essentially flipping the switch into the “off” position. They speculate that this disassembly pathway may provide a means of keeping telomerase at exceptionally low levels inside the cell. Although eroding telomeres in normal cells can contribute to the aging process, cancer cells, in contrast, rely on elevated telomerase levels to ensure unregulated cell growth. The “off” switch discovered by Tucey and Lundblad may help keep telomerase activity below this threshold.

This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Fritz B. Burns Foundation and a Rose Hills Foundation Fellowship.

.

.

Your Daley Gator Daley Quote For 09/25/14

“Albert Einstein’s ‘special theory of relativity’, while brilliantly conceived, does not meet the celebrated physicist’s own scientific falsifiability standard. Therefore, by Einsteinian reckoning alone, E = mc2 is a dubious mathematical formula.” – Edward L. Daley

Still, ya gotta love the guy.

.

Your Daley Gator Prager University Crash Course In… Life


FEMINISM VS. TRUTH

.
WHAT CREATES WEALTH?

.
WHAT MATTERS MOST IN LIFE?

.
THE GOVERNMENT VS. THE AMERICAN CHARACTER

.
IS THE UN FAIR TO ISRAEL?

.
TEACHERS UNIONS VS. STUDENTS

.
WAS IT WRONG TO DROP THE ATOM BOMB ON JAPAN?

.
WHAT IS SOCIAL JUSTICE?

.
GOD VS. ATHEISM: WHICH IS MORE RATIONAL?

.
THE TRUTH ABOUT THE VIETNAM WAR

.
ARE PEOPLE BORN GOOD?

.
WHY AMERICA’S MILITARY MUST BE STRONG

.

.

The Daley Gator Videos Site Has A New Address!


………..DaleyGatorVideos.altervista.org

..

.