Ho-Hum Another corrupt Democrat compares Tea Party to the Confederacy

Old Rantin’ Rangel can say the darndest things so this clip is not surprising in that it contains a gratuitous amount of BS and race baiting. What IS shocking is that Martin Bashir, he is not a newsman but he pretends to be one on MSNBS has contracted a case of Perpetual Serious Face

Seriously, every time I see Bashir on TV he has that same face. Maybe he is constipated? Take a look at the heartbreaking effects of Perpetual Serious Face

martin-bashir martin-bashir1 martin-bashir2 martin-bashir3 martin-bashir4 martin-bashir5 martin-bashir6

 

Those who do not understand history should really keep their mouths shut

Jefferson Davis, Präsident der CSA Deutsch: 18...

Jefferson Davis, Präsident der CSA Deutsch: 1861: Jefferson Davis (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

I could call this a defense of Jefferson Davis, one of the most misunderstood American historical giants, because RS McCain does a fine job setting some of the record straight on Davis. McCain starts out by quoting the inane ramblings of one Colby King

 

“A question settled by violence, or in disregard of law, must remain unsettled forever.”

– Jefferson Davis

What’s up with this trend, huh? A week ago, James Fallows decided to drag John C. Calhoun into the current argument, and this week we have another liberal foray into bizarre counterfactual rhetoric:

The Washington Post’s Colby King took another stab Saturday at impugning and discrediting the Tea Party as a bunch of racists who are little more than an extension of the Confederacy. In a column titled “The rise of the New Confederacy,” King, a regular on Inside Washington, argued: “Today there is a New Confederacy, an insurgent political force that has captured the Republican Party and is taking up where the Old Confederacy left off in its efforts to bring down the federal government.”
The former deputy editorial page editor, whose column appears every Saturday, paid a back-handed compliment to House conservatives as he charged: “The New Confederacy, as churlish toward President Obama as the Old Confederacy was to Lincoln, has accomplished what its predecessor could not: It has shut down the federal government, and without even firing a weapon or taking 620,000 lives, as did the Old Confederacy’s instigated Civil War.” . . .
He asserted “they respond, however, to the label ‘tea party.’ By thought, word and deed, they must be making Jefferson Davis proud today.”

 

The Left, of course uses the word Confederacy as a slur. Likely because they do not understand that part of our history. McCain, however, DOES understand that part of our history

 

Jefferson Davis was an American hero long before he became the unfairly demonized President of the Confederacy.

A native of Kentucky — born, ironically, not far from the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln — he was raised in Mississippi and, at age 16, appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. After graduation, Davis served as a young lieutenant at the frontier outpost Fort Crawford in present-day Wisconsin. There, Davis fell in love with Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of the fort’s commander, Col. Zachary Taylor. So in love was Davis, in fact, that he resigned from the army in order to marry Sarah (whose father wished to spare his daughter the difficult life of an Army officer’s wife), but tragedy soon struck: The newlyweds fell victim to an outbreak of malaria in 1835. Sarah died and her grief-stricken husband fell so ill that his survival was in doubt.

After recovering his health, Davis eventually entered politics, and campaigned for James K. Polk’s election as president in 1844. Davis was later elected to Congress, but when the Mexican-American War broke out in 1846, the West Point graduate and veteran officer resigned his House seat, raised a volunteer regiment, and became colonel of the famed “Mississippi Rifles.” His bravery at the battles of Monterrey and Buena Vista won Davis national distinction.

His commanding general in Mexico was his former father-in-law, now General Zachary Taylor. Recalling how he had opposed his late daughter’s marriage to the young officer, Taylor told Davis, “My daughter, sir, was a better judge of men than I was.”

Davis was appointed to the Senate in 1847, filling the seat of a senator who had died in office. He resigned that seat to run unsuccessfully for governor of Mississippi but, in 1853, was appointed Secretary of War by President Franklin Pierce. As Secretary, Davis supervised key work that helped prepare for the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad. Davis was then re-elected to the Senate, where he served until resigning after Mississippi seceded from the Union.

In his farewell speech to the Senate, Davis recalled when he had defended the right of secession — for Massachusetts:

I well remember an occasion when Massachusetts was arraigned before the bar of the Senate, and when then the doctrine of coercion was rife and to be applied against her because of the rescue of a fugitive slave in Boston. My opinion then was the same that it is now. Not in a spirit of egotism, but to show that I am not influenced in my opinion because the case is my own, I refer to that time and that occasion as containing the opinion which I then entertained, and on which my present conduct is based. I then said, if Massachusetts, following her through a stated line of conduct, chooses to take the last step which separates her from the Union, it is her right to go, and I will neither vote one dollar nor one man to coerce her back; but will say to her, God speed, in memory of the kind associations which once existed between her and the other States.

Such was his firmness of principle and, although his critics then and since have found fault with Davis, no man ever doubted his honesty or his courage. The name of this heroic American – a soldier and statesman, who earned praise for his service in war and in peace — deserves more honor than to be slung around ignorantly as a political epithet more than a century after his death.

 

One other fact about Davis that matters if you wish to understand him. He was sickened that anyone would think the South had seceded over, or was fighting for slavery. He also tried everything he knew to avoid secession, even though he supported the right of a State to commit to secession. Biographer Joseph McElroy sums up Davis, and his counterpart Lincoln this way. Lincoln was willing to sacrifice the Constitution to save the Union.Davis was willing to sacrifice the Union to save the Constitution. For those who would say “well without the union, what would the Constitution matter?” I ask this, without strict adherence to the Constitution, what type of Union will we have? I think my question is being answered today.

 

 

 

The dumbest Tweet ever?

This might be. John Fugelsang certainly did some serious digging to get this nugget of idiocy out of The Pit of Eternal Leftist Inanity

This is the natural result of Liberals going to the same well over and again. Eventually, it dries up and you end up saying/writing/tweeting something so stupid that you make a complete mockery of yourself. Fugelsang illustrates this by trying to tie the Confederacy to a government shutdown. a shutdown I might point out is the result of Harry Reid and president Obama being unwilling to budge an inch on either delaying, defunding, or altering Obamacare in any way.Screen-shot-2013-09-30-at-4.33.20-PM

If I may, allow me to set something straight here. The Confederacy was formed when seven states decided that the Northern States were going to use force to unfairly tax them, trample their state sovereignty, yes, slavery being one among several issues at stake, but not, in my view the most crucial one and centralize power in Washington rather than in the States. What they were doing was what the 13 colonies had done before them. They declared their right to form a new government, and wanted only to be let alone. Upon Lincoln’s call for 75,000 troops to force these states back into a union they no longer wished to be in the states of Arkansas, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia seceded. Their leaving the union had nothing to do with slavery, a fact too many people, even many Conservatives overlook.

Another fact overlooked, or ignored by Republicans today is that at that time the Democratic party WAS the Conservative party. It was the party that believed the Constitution could only be changed by amending it. Many Republicans believed in higher law that superseded the Constitution. It was the disregard for the Constitution that scared the Southern States. The ideal of States being sovereign was dear to many Americans in that time, not only Southerners but Northerners as well. The issue of slavery has been used by Liberals, and many modern Conservatives to squelch any debate on the causes of the war, or on the worthiness of hailing Lincoln as a “great” president. But, that issue was more complex than many today are willing to accept. For instance, you hear people say that the South wanted to expand slavery to new territories. While this is true of some Southerners, consider 94% of Southerners owned no slaves, it is also true that Southerners held that territories were FEDERAL property, thus the sovereignty states held did not apply. These same Southerners, Jefferson Davis being a prime example, also held that when  a territory became a state, it then had every right to allow, or ban slavery. In other words, that was a States Rights issue.

Sadly too many folks today never study the real causes, positions, issues, etc of that day. The South was bad because, slavery. Lincoln was a saint because he “ended” slavery, and anything he did, like imprisoning thousands and shuttering newspapers for speaking out against his policies, is thus excused, again because, slavery!

One last thing about  the Democratic Party of that day. The Democratic Party was born out of the Democrat-Republicans, the  party of Madison, Jefferson, and Monroe among others. That party split into the Democratic Party and the National Republicans in the late 1820’s with the National Republicans fading away very quickly. Again, at that time the Democratic Party WAS the party more affiliated with the Founders than their political opponents the Whigs were. It was out of the Whig party that the Republican Party rose, yes, with a strong sentiment against slavery. Of course many Republicans of that time wanted slavery abolished, and the former slaves gone from the country. Yes Lincoln was one of those who supported that. Google “Liberia” if you have doubts.

Eventually the Republicans and Democrats switched roles, we all know who the Conservatives and Liberals are today. Of course, it ought to be remembered that after the War Between the States Republicans included Progressives like Teddy Roosevelt, and so did the Democrats with the likes of Woodrow Wilson. It was not always so easy to define a politician by his party affiliation.

I write these things because I tire of the ignorance I hear about the War of Northern aggression, and the bashing of the South and the Confederacy as some evil enterprise that sought to destroy self-government when in fact the Confederacy was the greatest stand against the centralization of governmental power. Yes, the war changed this nation, and yes the end of slavery was an overdue result, and a result that would have happened even without a war. But the destruction of State Sovereignty, and the rise of an all-powerful federal government was a drastic blow to this nation. If you do not believe me, look around. look at how much more powerful the federal started becoming after Appomattox. Look what disgraces like Teddy Roosevelt, who should be removed from Mt. Rushmore, and replaced by Madison, Woodrow Wilson, FDR, LBJ, Jimmy Carter, and Barack Obama have done to America since the turn of the century. The change they brought to America was largely made possible by the destruction of state sovereignty.

Maybe these soldiers fought for a lot of the same principles?

American Revolutionary Soldiers 7 Confederate

Someone needs a lesson in history UPDATED my comments added

Gotta go to work, I will add my comments to this buffoon’s comments later tonight

OK, now let me try to set this Leftist straight. I cannot say what side of the Civil War War Between the States Rush would have been on. I do not call it a Civil War because a civil war is twp or more factions fighting for control of a national government. The Southern states were NOT seeking to take over the federal government.they were explicitly seeking to do much the same thing as the thirteen colonies had done, that is announce their independence to form a new nation. rather than seeking to conquer Washington DC, the Confederate States pleaded to just be let alone. Mr. Lincoln was not willing to do that, “where will our revenues come from” he asked when it was suggested the South be allowed to leave peacefully. His call for 75,000 volunteers to put down the “rebellion” caused the states of Arkansas, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia to secede. Slavery, to these states was not an issue, they wished to stay in the original union until they saw Lincoln expected them to attack their sister states. This clip from Gods and Generals explains it very well

So, as I stated earlier, I have no idea how Rush would have gone, many very good men fought on both sides. Even some of my ancestors fought for the Union, although most wore the gray and butternut of the Confederacy. I am proud of all of them, and will not allow pin headed academics in the clip from CNN to tarnish their intentions or aims.

 

Why yes it is a holiday here in Texas, a holiday that the politically correct should leave alone

Today, January 19, is a holiday. It is Confederate Heroes Day It falls on the birthday of Robert E.lee. similar holidays are in place around this time all over the South. Stonewall Jackson was born on Jan. 24. April also brings Confederate Memorial Days in several states. The point of these holidays has nothing to do with race, or slavery. They have one purpose, to honor the memories of the many brave men who served in the Confederate military. A good number of my ancestors served in that war. Among the regiments are the 4th south Carolina Cavalry, my Great-Great Grandfather Allan Dean McWhorter, who went blind in a Northern prison camp. The 29th Georgia Infantry, my Great-Great-Great Uncle Stephen W.N. Hagin, The 56th Georgia, my Great-Great Grandfather  Lt.William A. Allen, who lost an eye at Vicksburg and the 63rd Georgia Infantry, and my Great-Great Grandfather Martin C. Mewburn, who was wounded at Kennesaw Mountain. There are others from Florida, Alabama, and many more from Georgia. 

This morning, I saw some recent columns penned about how bad these holiday are, and how we should just forget about our past, and our heritage. Mainly these pleas for erasing history come from some, historically challenged, and emotionally fragile sort who is deathly afraid of offending someone. Funny these folks are not worried about offending me, or many other Southerners. They do not concern themselves with offending those that do living history presentations, or those that value history being preserved. these folks tend to be Liberal, but sadly, some “Conservatives” go down the path of hyper-sensitivity as well. They seem mostly concerned with not appearing too extreme. they are willing to sacrifice the Confederate portion of American history. Guess it never dawned on these geniuses that by bowing to those attacking Confederate heritage, history, and symbols that they are helping the radical Left to attack our Founders, and our American heritage.

Sure, we can condemn Lee, Davis, the Confederate Flags, there are hundreds of different flags that were carried  by different regiments, and songs like Dixie in the name of “sensitivity”. But, any “sin” you can  accuse those symbols of also apply to Old Glory, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and The Star Spangled Banner. Don’t think so? Listen to the constant attacks on America by the Left. Slavery, White Supremacy, injustice, exclusion, and so on. Of course, history, such as it is taught, has indoctrinated millions to embrace Lincoln as a great Emancipator, and the South as nothing but a bunch of white Supremacists fighting for slavery. You have to ignore the many things Lincoln said about Blacks as being inherently inferior to Whites, and his wish to expel all Blacks from the country after their freedom was won, many Abolitionists also shared that vision on an all-White nation too, but don’t let history get in your way. Forget that much of the opposition to expanding slavery was based not on setting men free but on NOT allowing a new challenge in the labor pool.

You can forget that the States of Tennessee, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Virginia only seceded after Lincoln asked them to supply troops to help subjugate the Confederacy. You can forget that the ordinances of secession from these state do not mention slavery. You can forget that many Americans saw secession as a right, and that most states, upon ratifying the Constitution, declared that they remained sovereign states. You can forget that the “other” issue the issue of tariffs that deeply divided the nation. You can forget that because reducing the war to the “good” North vs the “evil” South is far easier than examining the issues and causes. Intellectual laziness is way easier! And, just to be clear, I know many people have studied this war in a very thorough way, and some of them conclude that slavery was the main cause. While I disagree with them, I respect their integrity and their devotion to history.

You can forget that many Southern generals favored enlisting Blacks in the Southern armies in exchange for granting them freedom. You can overlook that such a desire to win the war clearly showed far more than slavery was driving these men. You can forget that Stonewall Jackson ran a Sunday School in Lexington Virginia that educated blacks. You can forget that after the war Robert E. Lee, who called slavery an abomination, was attending church at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church when a Black man rose to take communion Edward C Smith tells the story

One Sunday at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, a well-dressed, lone black man, whom no one in the community—white or black—had ever seen before, had attended the service, sitting unnoticed in the last pew.

Just before communion was to be distributed, he rose and proudly walked down the center aisle through the middle of the church where all could see him and approached the communion rail, where he knelt. The priest and the congregation were completely aghast and in total shock.

No one knew what to do…except General Lee. He went to the communion rail and knelt beside the black man and they received communion together—and then a steady flow of other church members followed the example he had set.

After the service was over, the black man was never to be seen in Richmond again. It was as if he had been sent down from a higher place purposefully for that particular occasion.

Today, and deservingly so, Lee is honored throughout the country. Only Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln exceed him in monuments and memorials.

Unfortunately there are many Southerners who claim to cherish Lee and revere the flag for which he so nobly fought but still harbor rabidly racist sentiments towards blacks and their long-delayed social progress. Such people do not honor Lee, instead they disgrace him.

Lee absolutely never felt what these modern Southerners continue to feel—and certainly he would not want them, of all people, serving as the self-annointed guardians of his memory. His lasting legacy, in his own words, is, “Before and during the War Between the States I was a Virginian. After the war I became an American.”

To be an American, at least for Lee, meant to embrace the new social order that the war had established and that the Constitution had codified through the addition of three new amendments which abolished slavery (13th) in 1865, made blacks citizens (14th) in 1868, and awarded black males the right to vote (15th) in 1870.

While you are at it, you can forget that Jefferson Davis, saw it as the duty of Whites to educate Blacks so they could one day compete with and be part of the nation. Yes you often hear that education of slaves was illegal in the South. What you do not hear is how many southerners ignored those laws. Yes, often it was for  religious reasons, they cared about the eternal souls of slaves. And yes, it is an odd thing for us to fathom such a time. Slavery was evil, but, the South neither started that evil, nor did many Southerners embrace it. And yes, some slave owners were Black themselves.

You can also forget that Lincoln, in 1848 said this

Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up, and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable – a most sacred right – a right, which we hope and believe, is to liberate the world. 
Abraham Lincoln

Perhaps Lincoln forgot that in 1861?

Yes, you can over simplify the debate America had over slavery by forgetting that some of the disagreements were based on the fact that at the time slavery was constitutional. For example, you can forget that many Southern leaders are accused of being “for the expansion of slavery” into the territories. They were in favor, but that is not the entire story. The fact is that Jefferson Davis saw slavery as constitutional, and as territories were federal property, and not yet states, he felt that banning slavery there violated the constitution. He also held deeply that once those territories became states, it was perfectly within their right to either allow of prohibit slavery. Once you look at the entire story, you get a different view of Davis, and the many Southerners who agreed with him. And no, I am not going into the typical scripted “I am not defending slavery” spiel here. If you are too stupid to get what I am saying then to Hell with you frankly. The point is that Davis was a man who held the Constitution sacred. He believed as most Southerners did, that there was but one way to change the Constitution, and that was to amend it! While I am at it, let me remind you that there were many “Republicans” at the time that believed in what they called higher law. To them higher law superseded the Constitution, I suppose it was their version of the Constitution being a “living, breathing” document.

As a Southerner, and a proud one, I am appalled that at one time slavery existed here. I am also of Jim Crow Laws, The same can be said of my pride in being American. Slavery was an awful stain on a great nation, but to be fair to men like Davis, and Lincoln, we ought to judge them based on the values of THEIR time, not ours. History is many things, and sometimes it is very ugly, and the portion of American history that deals with slavery is extremely ugly. hat does not mean that we ought to ignore it, nor should we pretend as many on the Left do, that it still exists.

You can forget whatever you like I suppose. But, once you start forgetting history because it is easy, or convenient, you have started down a path of ignorance that will only lead you to repeat much of the same history you have tried to bury.

Your Daley Douchebag is

This ass hat, who made counterfeit $100 bills, with Abe Lincoln’s face on them!

A Rhode Island man police say used counterfeit $100 bills to make purchases at a Target store made a critical mistake. The bills had a picture of President Abraham Lincoln on them. Real $100 bills bear a picture of Benjamin Franklin. Lincoln’s portrait graces the $5 bill. Dana Leland of Central Falls, R.I., was held on $1,000 cash bail after pleading not guilty Wednesday in Attleboro District Court to charges of uttering a counterfeit note and possession of a counterfeit note.

What are the odds he voted Obama?

 

Old Virginia Blog: Diversity In The Confederacy

History that many want to hide. Lots more here