Most Corrupt Attorney General In History Concocts Yet Another Crooked Scheme

Holder Cut Left-Wing Groups In On $17 Bil BofA Deal – Investors Business Daily

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Extortion: Radical Democrat activist groups stand to collect millions from Attorney General Eric Holder’s record $17 billion deal to settle alleged mortgage abuse charges against Bank of America.

Buried in the fine print of the deal, which includes $7 billion in soft-dollar consumer relief, are a raft of political payoffs to Obama constituency groups. In effect, the government has ordered the nation’s largest bank to create a massive slush fund for Democrat special interests.

Besides requiring billions in debt forgiveness payments to delinquent borrowers in Cleveland, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Oakland, Detroit, Chicago and other Democrat strongholds – and up to $500 million to cover personal taxes owed on those checks – the deal requires BofA to make billions in new loans, while also building affordable low-income rental housing in those areas.

If there are leftover funds in four years, the settlement stipulates the money will go to Interest on Lawyers’ Trust Account (IOLTA), which provides legal aid for the poor and supports left-wing causes, and NeighborWorks of America, which provides affordable housing and funds a national network of left-wing community organizers operating in the mold of Acorn.

In fact, in 2008 and 2009, NeighborWorks awarded a whopping $25 million to Acorn Housing.

In 2011 alone, NeighborWorks shelled out $35 million in “affordable housing grants” to 115 such groups, according to its website. Recipients included the radical Affordable Housing Alliance, which pressures banks to make high-risk loans in low-income neighborhoods and which happens to be the former employer of HUD’s chief “fair housing” enforcer.

BofA gets extra credit if it makes at least $100 million in direct donations to IOLTA and housing activist groups approved by HUD.

According to the list provided by Justice, those groups include come of the most radical bank shakedown organizations in the country, including:

• La Raza, which pressures banks to expand their credit box to qualify more low-income Latino immigrants for home loans;

• National Community Reinvestment Coalition, Washington’s most aggressive lobbyist for the disastrous Community Reinvestment Act;

• Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America, whose director calls himself a “bank terrorist;”

• Operation Hope, a South Central Los Angeles group that’s pressuring banks to make “dignity mortgages” for deadbeats.

Worse, one group eligible for BofA slush funds is a spin-off of Acorn Housing’s branch in New York.

It’s now rebranded as Mutual Housing Association of New York, or MHANY. HUD lists MHANY’s contact as Ismene Speliotis, who previously served as New York director of Acorn Housing.

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Most Corrupt Attorney General In History Embraces Being Called An Activist ‘1,000 Percent’

Holder Embraces Being Called An Activist ‘1000 Percent’ – Daily Caller

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Eric Holder does not shy away from being called an activist – in fact, the U.S. Attorney General considers the label an honor.

“If you want to call me an activist attorney general, I will proudly accept that label,” Holder told journalist Juan Williams in an interview published at The Hill.

“Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job,” he continued, adding that “the responsibility of the attorney general is to change things [and] bring us closer to the ideals expressed in our founding documents.”

Asked later about his response to critics who claim that the Justice Department houses an activist civil rights division and an activist chief, Holder said “I agree with you 1000 percent and [I am] proud of it.”

Holder also said he is troubled by the affirmative action stance of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, who opposes the policy in maintaining that “the way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race.”

“There are still [racial] issues we as a society are working our way through,” Holder said. “And the lack of desire to do that, I think, undermines the ability that I think is inherent in the American people to make progress. But it also does not prepare us for demographic changes, the likes of which this country has never seen.”

Holder’s activism on racial issues is nothing new.

In a profile at Politico last month, he was described as President Obama’s “heat shield.” Sources close to Holder said he is able “to talk about things the president can’t talk about as easily.”

His stance on race was on display early on in the Obama administration when Holder infamously claimed that the U.S. is a “nation of cowards” when it comes to racial issues. Those comments and Holder’s hesitation in investigating two Philadelphia New Black Panther Party members accused of voter intimidation outside of a precinct in Philadelphia in 2008 won him the ire of conservatives.

The interview did highlight some of Holder’s bi-partisan initiatives, including the year-old “Smart on Crime” program which focuses on reducing the prison population and prison costs. Republican senators such as Rand Paul, Ted Cruz and John Cornyn are backing the project, which has made headway in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

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*VIDEO* House Regulatory Affairs Subcommittee Hearing On IRS Targeting Of Conservative Groups



……………………….Click on image above to watch video.

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Democrat Attorney General Who Refuses To Prosecute Democrat Lawmakers Lawyers Up

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kane Lawyers Up – Hot Air

The decision of Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane to drop the investigation and potential prosecution of Philadelphia Democrats who were recorded accepting cash, money orders, or jewelry certainly seems suspicious. According to news reports, investigators collected over 400 hours of audio and video of five Democrats, including four state lawmakers, before Kane, also a Democrat, secretly killed the investigation last fall. When confronted with this troubling story by the Philadelphia Inquirer, Kane cited racism and mismanagement in the investigation, but the detailed descriptions of the recordings certainly seem to indicate that the payments were made.

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Kane’s reaction to reports about her decision went from bad to worse. At first, she complained that white men were attacking her:

In the statement, Kane provided only one quote, dismissing those who questioned her decisions as “nothing more than the Good Ol’ Boys club playing political games to discredit me in order to fulfill their own selfish and improper agenda.”

The statement cited Kane’s pursuit of political-corruption cases, including the pay-to-play scandal involving Democrats tied to the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission and the corruption charges brought last week against Democratic State Sen. LeAnna Washington.

That was a pretty astounding escalation. It is not out of line to wonder why a state’s attorney general would drop an investigation which is said to have obtained detailed recordings of lawmakers taking bribes. The decision to dismiss the investigation under seal combined with Kane’s accusation that it was tainted by racism certainly is newsworthy and gives rise to an inference that, although we may not know exactly what went on here, something unusual did. That’s ordinarily a reason to give something more examination, not less.

But Kane, apparently frustrated by continuing scrutiny of her decision, has now escalated further, hiring counsel and suggesting that if the Inquirer continues to pursue the story, she would start suing people!

During the meeting, Sprague [Kane's new lawyer] suggested that The Inquirer may have been used by the sources of its stories – “wittingly or unwittingly” as a “weapon” to attack Kane to defend themselves from potential charges of wrongdoing in the management of the probe.

“I intend to look at the investigation from the very beginning to the conclusion of it, and in terms of what has been published, by this paper and others, to take appropriate action on behalf of the attorney general against those responsible for the defamatory and the false publications that have been made,” Sprague said.

It sounds like Kane or her new lawyer thinks the folks providing detailed information about the investigation into bribe-taking Democrats are the very investigators she claims were impermissibly motivated by race in the investigation.

The decision to lawyer up and take “appropriate action” against either the leakers or the papers goes far beyond the bounds of a reasonable response. This is indisputably a newsworthy story. The public deserves to know what happened with this investigation and why it happened. Kane’s acceleration from “it was racism” to “it’s the Good Ol’ Boys” to “I will start suing people” is despicable in any public servant, but even more so from the state’s top prosecutor.

The Inquirer’s editor, William K. Marimow, gets this exactly right:

“Our lead reporters, Angela Couloumbis and Craig McCoy, have interviewed many people with in-depth knowledge of the investigation, including members of Attorney General Kane’s staff, in order to ensure that the stories are accurate, thorough, and fair,” Marimow said. “These stories are the product of months of diligent and dogged reporting – not a leak from a person with a political agenda.”

He added, “In my opinion, this is precisely the kind of issue that requires public scrutiny, specifically the conduct of public officials who accepted cash or gifts from an undercover agent and the quality of a three-year investigation launched and ended by a state law enforcement agency.”

Bravo, Inquirer. That’s journalism.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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Most Corrupt Attorney General In History Tells State Attorneys To Ignore Their Laws

Holder Tells State Attorneys To Ignore Their Laws – Sweetness & Light

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From a cheering New York Times:

Holder Sees Way to Curb Bans on Gay Marriage

By MATT APUZZO | February 24, 2014

WASHINGTON – Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. on Monday injected the Obama administration into the emotional and politicized debate over the future of state same-sex marriage bans, declaring in an interview that state attorneys general are not obligated to defend laws that they believe are discriminatory.

So it’s okay for government officials to ignore their oaths of office and refuse to enforce a law they don’t personally agree with. But it’s a crime for a religious official to refuse a church wedding to some couple because of a personal belief.

Mr. Holder was careful not to encourage his state counterparts to disavow their own laws, but said that officials who have carefully studied bans on gay marriage could refuse to defend them.

So the Attorney General of the United States, the highest law enforcement officer in the country, says it is okay to ignore legally enacted laws. And, in fact, he is encouraging people to do so. Which he does on quite a few issues, by the way. (Cf. amnesty.)

Six state attorneys general – all Democrats – have refused to defend bans on same-sex marriage, prompting criticism from Republicans who say they have a duty to stand behind their state laws, even if they do not agree with them.

What nonsense. Only Republicans have to enforce laws they disagree with.

It is highly unusual for the United States attorney general to advise his state counterparts on how and when to refuse to defend state laws. But Mr. Holder said when laws touch on core constitutional issues like equal protection, an attorney general should apply the highest level of scrutiny before reaching a decision on whether to defend it. He said the decision should never be political or based on policy objections…

And, of course, they would never be political.

The nation’s first black attorney general, Mr. Holder has said he views today’s gay-rights campaigns as a continuation of the civil rights movement that won rights for black Americans in the 1950s and ’60s. He has called gay rights one of “the defining civil rights challenges of our time.”…

And if you call something a ‘civil right,’ then no one can oppose it. Just like amnesty has suddenly become a civil right.

His comments signal the latest manifestation of the Obama administration’s evolving position on gay rights. Mr. Obama came into office opposed to same-sex marriage. But in 2011, he decided against defending the Defense of Marriage Act and ended the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy barring gays and lesbians from the military. The next year, the president said he personally supported gay marriage…

All of which he did to boost the fundraising for his re-election campaign. But it wasn’t political. No way.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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Open carry of handguns in Texas?

Greg Abbott, our current Attorney General, and likely the next governor is a proponent of allowing concealed handgun license holders to open carry their weapons. I am fine with this. Open carry brings another level of responsibility with it. With concealed carry no one else knows you are armed. That goes away when you open carry, so it will be interesting what a new law would require of the license holder, and how police would handle the new laws. Of course, the nervous Nellies who would freak out when they saw a man or women with a .45 on their hip are an issue. We have largely become a society that fears guns, I wonder how that will be handled? Possibly requiring the license holder to wear their permit in a visible place when they open carry? 

 

Democrat AG From Maryland Photographed At Teen Party Says It’s Not His Job To Stop Underage Drinking

Gansler Says Breaking Up Teen Party Was Not His Job – Baltimore Sun

When Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler arrived at a house party of teenagers in June, he pushed through the crowd, past youngsters dancing on a table and a smattering of red plastic cups. One of the revelers snapped a photo.

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As the night wore on, teens at the South Bethany rental home posted tweets, photos and videos of a bash labeled the “eviction party” for its intensity – a celebration where underage participants later confirmed many were drinking alcohol.

Gansler, a Democrat who is running for governor, said this week that he stopped by the Delaware beach house to talk briefly with his teenage son and then left. He said he does not remember whether he saw anyone drinking. But even if he had, Gansler said, it was not his responsibility as a parent or a high-ranking law enforcement official to intervene.

“Assume for purposes of discussion that there was widespread drinking at this party,” Gansler said. “How is that relevant to me? …The question is, do I have any moral authority over other people’s children at beach week in another state? I say no.”

Advocates against substance abuse and underage drinking disagreed, saying adults shouldn’t look the other way.

“It’s totally inappropriate for an adult, especially for an elected official whose job is to uphold the laws of the state or any state,” said Michael Gimbel, an independent consultant and the former alcohol abuse prevention official for Baltimore County.

“For any parent to do this is irresponsible. But for an attorney general who fought for these laws on the books is even worse,” he said.

Gansler has publicly advocated against underage drinking, appearing less than a year ago in a video for the Century Council, a nonprofit that works to combat both teen drinking and drunken driving.

“Parents, you’re the leading influence on your teen’s decision not to drink,” Gansler said in a video filmed as part of the organization’s “Ask, Listen, Learn” initiative to persuade parents to talk to middle-school children about drinking. “It’s never too early to talk with your kids about smart ways to say no.”

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Century Council’s CEO and president Ralph Blackman, upon learning that Gansler had been at such a party, said, “Let me pick myself up off the floor here.”

Blackman added that he couldn’t judge what Gansler should have done while briefly stopping by a party. But he said that as a parent, he would hope to hold himself to a standard high enough to “not only set a good example and be a good role model for my own kid, but for the wider group of kids who all influence each other.”

“You can agree, you can disagree with the legal age,” Blackman said. But by looking the other way, “you are somehow suggesting that it is OK to break the law. It’s part of the value systems that go into young people’s decision making.”

Gansler, in a two-hour interview Tuesday about senior week and the June 13 party, said, “My responsibility is only to my child… Everybody has their own moral compass. Mine is to raise my own child.” He said firmly that his son was not drinking.

Gansler had attended a Maryland State Bar Association event in Ocean City earlier that evening. During his brief stay at the teens’ party, he was captured in both a video and a photo posted online. He did not dispute the authenticity of those images.

He said he was at the party only for a few minutes to discuss with his newly graduated son when they would leave Delaware the next morning for a college event in Pennsylvania. Of senior week, he said, “For better or worse, the reality is some kids drink alcohol while they’re there.”

The two-term attorney general and former Montgomery County state’s attorney said he had no more responsibility to shut down a party if he saw drinking than to stop teenagers walking down the street with beer cans in hand or investigate tailgate parties.

“Was I supposed to serve as the police officer?” Gansler asked. “No.”

Gansler was part of a group of parents who paid for a weeklong stay at a six-bedroom beach house after their sons’ graduation from the private Landon School in Bethesda.

The parents arranged for two fathers to serve as chaperones each night, paid for food and negotiated rules that forbade the boys from driving, having girls behind closed bedroom doors or drinking “hard alcohol,” according a copy of the rules and planning documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The list of prohibitions did not mention drinking beer or wine.

Gansler said that while he didn’t write the rules, he attended a meeting where parents discussed them and was one of two adults who explained them to the dozen boys.

“If anything bad happened, if the kids violated the rules, they’d be sent home,” Gansler said. “My guess is… that if someone drank beer, that would not be an offense for which the chaperones would want to send somebody home.”

Delaware law, like Maryland’s, does not distinguish among types of alcohol in its broad prohibition against underage drinking. In both states, the legal drinking age is 21.

It is legal for parents to allow their own children to drink at home.

In several photos posted online by people at the party, older adults can be seen standing in the background. In videos and photos, young people, both men and women, are dancing on a bar and on a table. In one video, a bucket of clear liquid is poured from the balcony onto dancers below. It’s unclear how many teens were drinking.

Some of the videos have since been removed from social media.

“I don’t remember much, but it was one of the best parties I’ve been to, hands down,” said one attendee who spoke to The Baltimore Sun this week under the condition of anonymity because some engaged in underage drinking.

Two days after the party, however, the house was in bad shape. Julie Barnes, who has for years cleaned the home after renters, said she arrived on June 15 to find the wooden floors rippled from moisture damage, dents that appeared to be made from high heels on the bar and pool table, and floors sticky from what smelled like beer. According to minutes of a South Bethany Town Council meeting where the vandalism was discussed, the house sustained about $50,000 worth of damage.

Police who investigated did not place blame on the Landon group and classified the damage as likely the result of a burglary that occurred sometime between Friday evening and Saturday when Barnes arrived to clean. The Landon group turned in their keys Friday afternoon, parents said.

A parent who chaperoned the night of the party but would not discuss whether there was drinking said he helped the boys clean up the next morning. He said they left the house in good shape. Another parent said a representative of the realty company ResortQuest called afterward to say the house was fine and minor damage would be covered by the security deposit. The parents asked not to be identified to protect their children’s privacy. Representatives from ResortQuest did not respond to a request for comment.

Gansler said the parents assume that someone broke in and trashed the house after the boys checked out.

“Apparently, the night before, the parents who were chaperoning it kicked kids out” because it was getting too crowded, Gansler said. “The thought was [the damage] was so malicious that they were trying to get revenge or back at the parents who were chaperoning for kicking them out.”

The home’s owner, Timothy Dickson, lives in Virginia and said he thought he and his wife were renting to several families vacationing together, not to a dozen recent high school graduates. He said they were dismayed by the teens’ behavior at their beach house as displayed on social media.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

H/T U.S. Constitutional Free Press

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