Muslim Brotherhood support dwindling in Egypt?

We can hope the Egyptian army is kicking their arsses it would seem

Support for the Muslim Brotherhood appears to be dwindling. According to JPost, the Muslim Brotherhood was calling for a mass “Friday of Martyrs” protest and very few showed up. 

Jpost reports the following:

CAIRO – Mass protests called by Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood mostly failed to materialize on Friday as the movement reeled from a bloody army crackdown on followers of ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

Troops and police had taken relatively low-key security measures before the “Friday of Martyrs” processions that were to have begun from 28 mosques in the capital after weekly prayers.

But midday prayers were cancelled at some mosques and there were few signs of major demonstrations unfolding in Cairo.

“We are not afraid; it’s victory or death,” said Mohamed Abdel Azim, a retired oil engineer who was among about 100 people marching slowly from a mosque near Cairo University. [...]

The Brotherhood, hounded by Egypt’s new army-backed rulers, had called for demonstrations across the country against the crackdown, testing the resilience of its battered support base.

A few dozen Islamists, many of them women, marched in an old Cairo district. Some carried Egyptian flags or rolled-up Morsi posters. Others held umbrellas to ward off the afternoon sun. [...]

Security forces kept a watchful eye, but did not flood the streets, even near Cairo’s central Fateh mosque where gun battles killed scores of people last Friday and Saturday.

The mosque’s metal gates and big front door were locked and chained. Prayers were cancelled. Two armored vehicles were parked down the street, where people shopped at a busy market.

Read the rest. the sooner the “Broterhood” is sent packing the better

 

At Least 51 Killed, 435 Injured In Clash Outside Cairo Republican Guard Headquarters

At Least 51 Killed In Clash Outside Cairo Republican Guard Headquarters – Fox News

At least 51 people were killed and 435 were injured Monday in bloody clashes outside a military building in Cairo, according to Egypt’s head of emergency services.

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Mohammed Sultan, head of emergency says the victims were wounded mostly by live ammunition and birdshot.

Eyewitnesses tell Fox News that Muslim Brotherhood supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi were fired upon with birdshot and rounds from automatic weapons at around 5:30 a.m. local time, during morning prayers. Fox News sources who were at the scene shortly after the shooting described seeing Muslim Brotherhood supporters with large chest wounds and fatal gunshot wounds in their backs.

The Muslim Brotherhood have blamed the attacks on the Egyptian military who were standing guard over the demonstration near to the Raba El Adwyia mosque.

Monday’s fighting caused the highest death toll since massive protests forced Morsi’s government from power last week and established an interim civilian administration.

The interim administration issued a statement on the state news agency Monday expressing regret for the bloodshed in Cairo, according to Reuters. The statement said the violence was the result of an attempt by protesters to attack the Republican Guard building and asked protesters not to approach any military “or other vital installations.” Transitional administration officials also said they formed a judicial committee to investigate the incident.

There were conflicting reports on how the fighting began, with Morsi’s supporters saying it was an unprovoked attack and the military saying they came under assault first.

At a nationally televised press conference Monday afternoon, spokesmen for the military and police said troops guarding the republican Guard complex came under “heavy gunfire” in the middle of the night as attackers stationed on rooftops opened fire with guns and molotov cocktails.

A spokesman confirmed that one army officer and two policemen were dead, and 42 were injured in the raid. The military says it had a right to defend the building, adding that the protest “was no longer peaceful.” The spokesman also pointed out that suspected Islamists have coordinated armed attacks on several military facilities recently in the Sinai Peninsula.

One witness, university student Mirna el-Helbawi, also said gunmen loyal to Morsi opened fire first, including from the roof of a nearby mosque. El-Helbawi, 21, lives in an apartment overlooking the scene.

Supporters of Morsi, however, said the security forces fired on hundreds of protesters, including women and children, at the sit-in encampment as they performed early morning prayers.

The military blamed the attacks on so-called “terrorist” groups. Late Sunday night military helicopters dropped leaflets on pro-Morsi protesters in the Cairo university area calling on Morsi followers and terrorists to end their protests.

Meanwhile, Egypt’s top Muslim cleric – Sheik Ahmed el-Tayeb – warned of “civil war” and announced he was going into seclusion as a show of protest to both sides until the violence ceases.

El-Tayeb, the head of the Al-Azhar Mosque, said he had “no choice” but to seclude himself at home “until everyone shoulders his responsibility to stop the bloodshed instead of dragging the country into civil war.”

A presidency spokesman said Monday’s violence will not derail efforts to form a new interim government. “What happened will not stop steps to form a government, or the (political) roadmap,” said Ahmed Elmoslmany, according to a Reuters report.

Al Nour, Egypt’s second-most prominent Islamist party after the Muslim Brotherhood, has said it will withdraw from negotiations with the interim government and the Muslim Brotherhood has called for its supporters to “rise up” against those who want to steal the revolution.

The military – which effectively supported the anti-Morsi movement – now may face pressure to impose stricter security measures to try to keep unrest from spilling out of control. It will also have to produce compelling evidence to support its version of events or otherwise suffer what is already shaping to be a Brotherhood media blitz to portray the military as a brutal institution with little regard for human life or democratic values.

In a move that is likely to further inflame the situation, the Freedom and Justice party, the Muslim Brotherhood’s political arm, called on Egyptians to rise up against the army. Morsi has been a longtime leader of the Brotherhood.

Liberal politician Mohamed ElBaradei expressed dismay at the bloodshed, sending a message on Twitter that read “Violence begets violence and should be strongly condemned. Independent Investigation a must. Peaceful transition is only way.”

Satellite broadcaster Al-Jazeera showed footage from a nearby field hospital of at least six dead bodies laid out on the ground, some with severe wounds. A medic from the area, Hesham Agami, said ambulances were unable to transport more than 200 wounded to hospitals because the military had blocked off the roads.

Al-Shaimaa Younes, who was at the sit-in, said military troops and police forces opened fire on the protesters during early morning prayers. “They opened fire with live ammunition and lobbed tear gas,” she said by telephone. “There was panic and people started running. I saw people fall.”

Women and children had been among the protesters, she said.

Morsi supporters have been holding rallies and a sit-in outside the Republican Guard building since the military deposed Morsi last week during massive protests against him. The military chief replaced Morsi with an interim president, until presidential elections are held. But Morsi’s supporters refuse to recognize the change in leadership and insist Morsi be reinstated. Besides the Republican Guard sit-in, they are also holding thousands-strong daily rallies at a nearby mosque.

Morsi’s opponents are also holding rival rallies. They say the former president lost his legitimacy by mismanaging the country and not ruling democratically, leading to a mass revolt that called on the army to push him from office.

Military spokesman Col. Ahmed Mohammed Ali said initial information indicates that gunmen affiliated with the Brotherhood tried to storm the Republican Guard building shortly after dawn, firing live ammunition and throwing firebombs from a nearby mosque and rooftops. One police officer on the scene was killed, he said. Another military spokesman, who declined to be named because he was not authorized to brief reporters, said five from the Brotherhood side were killed.

A statement by the armed forces published on the state news agency said “an armed terrorist group” tried to storm the Republican Guard building, killing one officer and seriously injuring six. The statement said the forces arrested 200 attackers, armed with guns and ammunition.

After declaring the ouster of Morsi last Wednesday, the Defense Minister Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi replaced him with Egypt’s chief justice and suspended the constitution until new presidential elections.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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16 Dead, At Least 200 Injured In Violent Clashes At Cairo University (Video)

Cairo University Clashes Intensify Leaving 16 Dead, At Least 200 Injured – Ahram

Clashes escalated near Cairo University in the capital’s Giza district late Tuesday night, where supporters of President Mohamed Morsi continue to demonstrate.

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According to the latest health ministry statements, 16 people were killed and at least 200 injured.

Those injured included a police officer – Satea El-Nomany – who was shot in the eye, according to Al-Ahram’s Arabic-language news website.

Security forces have reportedly intervened in an effort to end the clashes.

According to eyewitnesses cited by Reuters, gunshots were heard in the area and police were seen firing tear gas.

Pro-Morsi demonstrators began gathering outside Cairo University late Monday night in response to millions-strong opposition rallies demanding that Morsi step down.

Clashes erupted in the area hours before Morsi’s Tuesday night televised address, in which he defied calls to step down, citing his democratic legitimacy.

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Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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Donald Douglas: The Muslim Brotherhood is finished in Egypt

Here you go, see what you think

At the New York Times:

As our colleagues David Kirkpatrick, Kareem Fahim and Ben Hubbard report, the head of the Egyptian military, Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, gave President Mohamed Morsi 48 hours “to respond to the people’s demands” or the armed forces would move to impose its “own road map for the future.” 

Reaction to the general’s warning, in a statement read aloud on state television, was swift, both online and on the streets of the capital, Cairo, where supporters and opponents of the president were still massed, one day after huge protests.

History is happening, I would love to see the Muslim Brotherhood out, and a Constitutional Republic established, we will see what the military does. More at Blazing Cat Fur

Mohamed Morsi’s regime has indicated that it will not give in to the threat of a military coup, just hours after the Egyptian army gave it 48 hours to placate the millions who have taken to the streets calling for the president’sdeparture.

Egypt’s Brotherhood is panicking, Western capitals are confused

Egypt’s Army Issues Ultimatum to Morsi

Egyptian Islamist Wasat party headquarters firebombed

Millions Of Protesters Take To The Streets Of Cairo In Largest Political Event Ever (Video)

Anti-Muslim Brotherhood Protests In Egypt: Largest Political Event In World History – Big Peace

The demonstrations that began Sunday in Cairo, Egypt against the Muslim Brotherhood government of President Mohamed Morsi have attracted “millions” of supporters and many counter-demonstrators as well, making the protest the largest political event in the history of the world, according to the BBC.

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The protests in Tahrir Square and throughout Egypt exceed those that ousted President Hosni Mubarak in 2011 in the key event of the Arab Spring. Two years later, after constitutional reforms and elections that saw Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood move to aggrandize their power, the public backlash is immense.

The demonstrations pose a puzzle for President Barack Obama, who was touring South Africa at the other end of the continent when the demonstrations began. In 2011, Obama initially supported Mubarak, then threw his weight behind the protests and reached out to the Muslim Brotherhood on its way to power.

The Obama administration, through Ambassador Anne Patterson, actively discouraged Sunday’s protests, as Breitbart News’ Kerry Picket reported last week. “Egypt needs stability to get its economic house in order, and more violence on the streets will do little more than add new names to the lists of martyrs,” she said.

Delivering an address at the University of Cape Town on Sunday night that was billed as the highlight of his three-nation tour, Obama touted Africa’s movement towards democracy but did not mention the Cairo protests, and downplayed the U.S. intervention in Libya and the chaos that followed in its wake.

The Tahrir Square protests in Cairo bear echoes of recent protests in Turkey, as well as the “Cedar Revolution” that took place in Lebanon in 2005, and the “Green Revolution” of Iran in 2009, when citizens took to the streets to protest economic stagnation, religious oppression, and costly foreign entanglements.

Yet if the Cedar Revolution was partly inspired by the toppling of Saddam Hussein in Iraq, and the Green Revolution was partly inspired both by Iraq and the end of the Taliban regime in neighboring Afghanistan, the new protests in Cairo and Istanbul seem endogenous, fueled by popular discontent at Islamist rule.

There are counter-demonstrations in Egypt, too, as Muslim Brotherhood activists have been able to mobilize thousands of their own followers in protests of support for Morsi. The Egyptian army, which may hold the balance of power, has yet to intervene–but could do so in an attempt to restore stability.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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Related articles:

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Protesters Firebomb And Ransack Muslim Brotherhood HQ In Egypt – The Blaze

Protesters stormed and ransacked the Cairo headquarters of President Mohammed Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood group early Monday, in an attack that could spark more violence as demonstrators gear up for a second day of mass rallies aimed at forcing the Islamist leader from power.

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Organizers of the protests, meanwhile, gave Morsi until 5 p.m. on Tuesday to step down and called on the police and the military to clearly state their support for what the protest movement called the popular will.

Sunday saw millions of Egyptians flood the streets nationwide in a massive outpouring of anger and frustration with the president and the Brotherhood, the Islamist group that propelled Morsi to power. The protests were largely peaceful, although in a sign of the volatility of the country’s divisions, clashes erupted in the evening around the Brotherhood’s Cairo headquarters between armed Morsi supporters barricaded inside the building and young protesters pelting it with firebombs and rocks.

After clashes raged overnight, protesters managed to breach the compound’s defenses and storm the six-story building early Monday, carting off furniture, files, rugs, blankets, air conditioning units and portraits of Morsi, according to an Associated Press journalist at the scene. One protester emerged with a pistol and handed it over to a policeman outside.

Footage on local TV networks showed smashed windows, blackened walls and smoke billowing out of the fortified villa in the Muqatam district in eastern Cairo. A fire was still raging on one floor hours after the building was stormed. One protester tore down the Muslim Brotherhood sign from the building’s front wall, while another hoisted Egypt’s red, black and white flag out an upper-story window and waved it in the air in triumph.

Health Ministry spokesman Yehya Moussa told state television that at least 16 people nationwide have been killed in violence related to the protests since Sunday, eight of them at the Brotherhood’s headquarters. A total of 781 people have been injured, he added.

It was not immediately clear whether the Brotherhood supporters holed up inside who had been battling the protesters late Sunday fled the building overnight.

Morsi’s critics view the Brotherhood headquarters as the seat of real power in Egypt, consistently claiming that the Islamist group’s spiritual leader, Mohammed Badie and his powerful deputy, Khairat el-Shater, were the ones actually calling the shots in the country, not the president.

The Brotherhood has in recent weeks fortified the building’s walls in anticipation of the massive opposition protests in which millions took part on Sunday in a display of anger and frustration with the Islamist leader on the anniversary of his inauguration.

On Monday, anti-Morsi protesters were gearing up for a second day of demonstrations.

Some protesters spent the night in dozens of tents pitched in the capital’s central Tahrir Square and in front of the president’s Ittihadiya Palace. They have vowed to stay there until Morsi resigns. The president’s supporters, meanwhile, continued their sit-in in front of a major mosque in another part of Cairo.

The anti-Morsi demonstrators are calling for widespread labor strikes in an attempt to ratchet up the pressure on the president, but it was not immediately clear whether unions would respond to the call. Organizers are also calling for sit-ins at the Cabinet building, interim parliament, and another presidential place where Morsi has been working since late last week.

Sunday’s protests were the largest seen in Egypt in the 2 1/2 years of turmoil since the ouster of autocrat Hosni Mubarak in February 2011.

Fears were widespread that the collisions between the two sides could grow more violent in coming days. Morsi made clear through a spokesman that he would not step down and his Islamist supporters vowed not to allow protesters to remove one of their own, brought to office in a vote deemed free and fair.

During the day Sunday, thousands of Islamists massed not far from the presidential palace in support of Morsi, some of them prepared for a fight with makeshift armor, sticks and shields.

The anti-Morsi protesters aimed to show by sheer numbers that the country has irrevocably turned against him, a year to the day after he was inaugurated as Egypt’s first freely elected president. But throughout the day and even up to midnight at the main rallying sites, fears of rampant violence did not materialize.

Instead the mood was largely festive as protesters at giant anti-Morsi rallies in Tahrir and outside the Ittihadiya palace spilled into side streets and across boulevards, waving flags, blowing whistles and chanting.

Fireworks went off overhead. Men and women, some with small children on their shoulders, beat drums, danced and sang, “By hook or by crook, we will bring Morsi down.” Residents in nearby homes showered water on marchers below – some carrying tents in preparation to camp outside the palace – to cool them in the summer heat, and blew whistles and waved flags in support.

“Mubarak took only 18 days although he had behind him the security, intelligence and a large sector of Egyptians,” said Amr Tawfeeq, an oil company employee marching toward Ittihadiya with a Christian friend. Morsi “won’t take long. We want him out and we are ready to pay the price.”

The massive outpouring against Morsi raises the question of what comes next. Protesters have vowed to stay on the streets until he steps down. The president, in turn, appears to be hoping protests wane.

For weeks, Morsi’s supporters have depicted the planned protest as a plot by Mubarak loyalists. But their claims were undermined by the extent of Sunday’s rallies. In Cairo and a string of cities in the Nile Delta and on the Mediterranean coast, the protests topped even the biggest protests of the 2011′s 18-day uprising, including the day Mubarak quit, Feb. 11, when giant crowds marched on Ittihadiya.

It is unclear now whether the opposition, which for months has demanded Morsi form a national unity government, would now accept any concessions short of his removal. The anticipated deadlock raises the question of whether the army, already deployed on the outskirts of cities, will intervene. Protesters believe the military would throw its weight behind them, tipping the balance against Morsi.

The country’s police, meanwhile, were hardly to be seen Sunday. In the lead-up to Sunday, some officers angrily told their commanders they would not protect the Brotherhood from protesters, complaining that police are always caught in the middle, according to video of the meeting released online.

“If the Brothers think that we will give up and leave, they are mistaken,” said lawyer Hossam Muhareb as he sat with a friend on a sidewalk near the presidential palace. “They will give up and leave after seeing our numbers.”

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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Armed Forces Gives 48-Hour Ultimatum Until Take-Over – Egypt Independent

The Egyptian army threatened Monday to take over power if political forces failed to reach consensus over the future of the country.

A spokesperson for the General Command of the Armed Forces, speaking in an audio statement broadcast by state television, gave all political groups in Egypt a 48-hour grace period to respond to the demands of the people.

The army reiterated its “call that the demands of the people be met and gives [all parties] 48 hours, as a last chance, to take responsibility for the historic circumstances the country is going through,” the statement, read out on television, said.

“If the demands of the people are not met in this period…[the army] will announce a future roadmap and measures to oversee its implementation.”

The statement praised Sunday’s protests against the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood and President Mohamed Morsy.

On June 23, Defence Minister Abdel Fattah al-Sisi said that the moral responsibility of the army towards the people compels it to intervene and prevent the country from sliding into a dark tunnel of conflict, internal strife, criminality and treason.

This responsibility demanded the army save Egypt from the possibility of becoming a failed state.

He has also called on all political forces to reach a formula of understanding and genuine reconciliation to protect Egypt and its people.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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Related video:

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Why are we arming our enemies?

Stories like this make my head want to explode

For Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood-dominated government, more battle tanks and jet fighters are on their way from the United States.

Cairo’s military link to Washington has remained intact, meaning the U.S. will continue to modernize the biggest military in Africa — even as President Mohammed Morsi has decreed near-absolute power for himself and his supporters and opponents battle outside his palace.

Analysts say Egypt’s military buildup presents risks for Washington — and Israel — with the growing influence of the Brotherhood, whose overriding goal is to establish Shariah, or Islamic, law worldwide.

A Pentagon statement to The Washington Times on Thursday said: “We are always reviewing our foreign assistance to make sure foreign assistance advances U.S. objectives and is being used for the right purposes.”

Good grief! Morsi is grabbing dictatorial power for himself, Sharia Law is looming in Egypt, and the threat Egypt poses to Israel is growing. Yet, we are arming those that would seek Israel’s destruction, and ultimately ours too? Frank Gaffney shares my concern

“My principal concern with the Obama administration’s approach to Egypt is they seem oblivious to the fact it is now in the hands of a regime that is deeply hostile to the United States and certainly poses an immediate threat, I believe, to our friends in Israel,” said Mr. Gaffney, who runs the Center for Security Policy. “Under those circumstances, it is alarming that they are continuing to arm Egypt in a way that can only exacerbate the threat.”

Mr. Morsia Brotherhood leader before his election, relies on the global fraternity as a power base.

“There are two things that are troubling,” Mr. Gaffney said. “One is the sheer quantity of the weapons that these enemies of the United States have inherited, let alone those they will be getting if we continue to make arms sales with them. The second is the quality of these weapons.”

Gaffney is right. This will lead to no good, stupidity on this scale always does.

Egypt: 5 Dead, 600 Injured In Overnight Clashes In Cairo (Video)

Egypt: 5 Dead, 600 Injured In Overnight Clashes In Cairo – Right Scoop

It seems like Egypt is once again descending into chaos with these violent clashes between Morsi’s supporters and his detractors. According to the report below, just last night’s clashes left 5 dead and 600 injured. The military has finally moved in and ordered people to leave the presidential palace area but they are supposed to return later.

YAHOO NEWS – The Egyptian army deployed tanks and gave both supporters and opponents of Mohammed Morsi a deadline to leave the area outside the presidential palace Thursday following fierce street battles that left five people dead and more than 600 injured in the worst outbreak of violence between the two sides since the Islamist leader’s election.

The intensity of the overnight violence, with Morsi’s Islamist backers and largely secular protesters lobbing firebombs and rocks at each other, signaled a possible turning point in the 2-week-old crisis over the president’s assumption of near-absolute powers and the hurried adoption of a draft constitution.

Opposition activists defiantly called for another protest outside the palace later Thursday, raising the specter of more bloodshed as neither side showed willingness to back down.

But the army’s Republican Guard, an elite unit assigned to protect the president and his palaces, gave protesters on both sides until 3 p.m. (1300 GMT, 8 a.m. EDT) to clear the vicinity, according to an official statement. The statement also announced a ban on protests outside any of the nation’s presidential palaces.

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Here’s a video of some of the clashes. As the video opens you’ll see the Muslim Brotherhood offices in Cairo on fire as protesters are burning whatever they can of Morsi’s party:

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Click HERE For Rest Of Story

Yes, these Middle East protests were planned before that stupid video ever saw the light of day

 

Via Gateway Pundit

The Muslim protests were planned back in August – before the film was ever released.

The protest in Cairo was organized by the terror group, Jamaa Islamiya.
USA Today reported:

The protest was planned by Salafists well before news circulated of an objectionable video ridiculing Islam’s prophet, Mohammed, said Eric Trager, an expert at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

The protest outside the U.S. Embassy in Cairo was announced Aug. 30 by Jamaa Islamiya, a State Department-designated terrorist group, to protest the ongoing imprisonment of its spiritual leader, Sheikh Omar abdel Rahman. He is serving a life sentence in the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center.

When the video started circulating, Nader Bakkar, the spokesman for the Egyptian Salafist Noor party, which holds about 25% of the seats in parliament, called on people to go to the embassy. He also called on non-Islamist soccer hooligans, known as Ultras, to join the protest.

On Monday, the brother of al-Qaeda leader Ayman al Zawahiri, Mohamed al Zawahiri, tweeted that people should go to the embassy and “defend the prophet,” Trager said.

Zawahiri justified al-Qaeda’s 9/11 attacks in an interview with Al Jazeera last month.

The first clip of “Innocence of Muslims” was shown on Al-Nas TV, an Egyptian Islamist television station, on September 8, 2012.

 

 

This one ought to make you think

 

From Black and Right

In watching the unfolding misunderstanding in the Middle East, I now fully understand the wise words initially issued that in part read,

“The Embassy of the United States in Cairo condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims — as we condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions.”

My question is why won’t Christians in the United States show the restraint now being displayed by believers in the Middle East?

While I am personally God-fearing, I don’t belong to an organized religion in the United States that can range in size from the mom-and-pop to the small corporation. What does bother me are the thin skins of Christians worldwide who take to the streets in murderous hordes whenever anyone expressing free speech makes any kind of statement or gesture that offends their religious feelings.

We should all be inspired by the restraint shown by those in other religions whose tenants are under constant attack and ridicule and respond with kindness and prayer.

We should also condemn the acts of Christians, especially in the United States for their stiffening attempts to create a theocracy, where all are forced to become Christian and any attempt to flee that theocracy can be met with imprisonment or even violent death.

How dare we, for example, treat our women as second-class citizens under the name of Christianity. When are we, as a so-called civilized nation, going to end of oppression in the name of the Bible? In many countries around the world, women are free to pursue happiness in any way they choose, unlike here as we’re constantly reminded by our more enlightened progressives, where we continue a “war on women”.

Be sure to read the rest folks, it speaks volumes about how the Left and its sick obsession with “equality” never allows it to see the facts right in front of their faces.

 

The worst possible thing you can do is show weakness to terrorists

And yet, on September 11th, our embassy is attacked by radical knuckle dragging Jihadist swine, and WE apologize?

A mob of protesters scaled the walls of the U.S. Embassy compound in Cairo and tore down its American flag on Tuesday, replacing it with a black flag commonly associated with Islamic terrorists.

The protesters were angered by a film that allegedly insults Muhammad, and attempted to raise a flag with the message “There is no god but Allah and Muhammad is his messenger,” Reuters reports. Muhammad is the prophet of Islam.

Warning shots were fired, but no one was injured.

The Associated Press reports that no embassy personnel were inside the compound at the time. Tuesday was the eleventh anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks that killed over 3,000 Americans. (SEE ALSO: U.S. negotiating $1B aid deal with Egypt)

The name of the offending film was not mentioned, but demonstrators chanted anti-American slogans and held up shredded pieces of the American flag.

The U.S. Embassy said in a statement that it “condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims — as we condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions.”

“Respect for religious beliefs is a cornerstone of American democracy,” the statement read. “We firmly reject the actions by those who abuse the universal right of free speech to hurt the religious beliefs of others.”

Oh no! Not hurt feelings! Are you kidding me? Muslims cannot take having their egos bruised? They cannot be offended without resorting to violence? Cry me a river! Tell you what, how about this, the next time any embassy of ours is attacked, we shoot dead every SOB attacking it, pull our people out, close the embassy, and leave a sign reading DO NOT MAKE US COME BACK! Instead we act like cowards? Good freaking grief!

Look, this is not complicated at all. If I offend someone, and I surely offend many every day on this blog, and they attack me physically for that offense, I do not owe them anything. Well, except for an ass whipping.

In a related post, RS McCain has a great post up about this. I think McCain AND his son, who is joining the Army, understand what I mean! And God bless a protect Bob McCain!

The other day I asked my wife where our 19-year-old son Bob was.

The answer: Hiking up a mountain with an 85-pound pack.

He recently enlisted in the Army, having scored a near-maximum on the ASVAB test, and will report to boot camp in a few months — some kind of delayed-entry deal — as an aspiring candidate for the elite Special Forces. Already a Red Cross certified lifeguard, he is so fired-up that he’s voluntarily doing PT (physical training) in advance, which is why he hiked up the mountain with an 85-pound pack.

Because he is preparing to kill our nation’s enemies.

My wife is concerned for our son’s safety. No, dear — let our nation’s enemies worry about their own safety. Because he’s coming to kill them.

Do you want to be America’s enemy? Really?

Egyptian protesters scaled the walls of the U.S. embassy on Tuesday, tore down the American flag and burned it during a protest over what they said was a film being produced in the United States that insulted Prophet Mohammad. . . .
Once the U.S. flag was hauled down, some protesters tore it up and showed off pieces to television cameras. Others burned the remains outside the fortress-like embassy building in central Cairo. . . .
“This movie must be banned immediately and an apology should be made,” said 19-year-old Ismail Mahmoud, a member of the so-called “ultras” soccer supporters who played a big role in the uprising that brought down Hosni Mubarak last year.

Hey, Ismail: Do you think this flag-burning stuff is smart? You want to turn this into war? You want my son to come kill you?

I don’t know anything about this movie you and your “ultra” mob are all excited about, Ismail, but attacking a U.S. embassy isn’t the kind of thing that Americans take lightly, no matter what gutless apologies you get from the pussies at the State Department. And the same goes for that mob of violent savages in Benghazi:

Gunmen and security forces clashed at the U.S. consulate office in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on Tuesday as the armed group protested over a film being produced in the United States, a security official said. . . .
“There are fierce clashes between the Libyan army and an armed militia outside the U.S. consulate,” Abdel-Monen Al-Hurr, spokesman for Libya’s Supreme Security Committee, said.
“The U.S. consulate’s security guards inside the building fired at the militia as it was trying to enter and attack it.”

See, I’ve got skin in the game, so to speak, and this is what enrages me about the folly of appeasement, which only invites such attacks.

Go read it all! I think RS McCain might agree with me that we need to fire whomever apologized, and do as Generals Stonewall Jackson or George S Patton might do

Annihilate these savages. Hunt them down and kill them, and kill any of those other vicious fanatical bastards who try to stop us.

Amen! Appeasement is a fool’s errand!

The Moral Retardation of the “International Community”

The Left loves to laud the greatness and wonder of the “International Community”. Myself, I think the opinion of the so-called IC is about as worthless as tits on a boar. Rick, at Wizbang takes note of the IC’s Selective Outrage Syndrome over Israel daring to defend itself.

Jews killing Muslims who are in effect invading Israel is anathema… but Muslims, who many claim are moderate, killing Christians is no big deal:

TWELVE Christian were murdered in Egypt. Two hundred and thirty-two people wounded. The death toll will surely rise as victims succumb to their injuries. And that’s just in the past few days. In the same time period, more Christians were killed in Egypt at the hands of Muslims than people killed in Syria or in Libya as a result of protests, riots and resistance.

Two churches in Cairo were burned in recent days. Over the past few months church property has being gutted, vandalised and violated with graffiti. Churches have been blown up.

An entire community – the Christian community in the new Egypt – is under attack. And the world remains relatively silent. There has been no significant religious outcry, political redress or diplomatic pressure to stop the attacks. There has been almost no media coverage as Egypt’s Muslims systematically, over the past few months, set about massacring Egypt’s Christians.

The world is not only standing idly by, it is enabling the massacre. The US naively expects that a new era, begun in new Egypt, will ripple to the rest of the Islamic world. So in the midst of these monstrous mass murders in Egypt, the US has decided to send an extra $US1 billion to help the Egyptians ease the economic crisis that emerged as a result of the ousting of Hosni Mubarak on February 11. Muslims in Egypt are on the warpath – on the religious warpath – and the US is feeding them money.

See how the mind of the far left works, or does not work, I might say. Israel is attacked, defends itself, and the Left and their beloved IC, is outraged. Muslims slaughtering Christians for  merely being Christian? No biggie! You seem the Left loves to speak of “equality”, but clearly, to them certain people, and certain religions, are more equal than others.

Daily Benefactor News – Pro And Anti-Mubarak Protesters Clash In Cairo

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Pro And Anti-Mubarak Protesters Clash In Cairo – The Blaze

Several thousand supporters of President Hosni Mubarak, including some riding horses and camels and wielding whips, attacked anti-government protesters Wednesday as Egypt’s upheaval took a dangerous new turn. In chaotic scenes, the two sides pelted each other with stones, and protesters dragged attackers off their horses.

The turmoil was the first significant violence between supporters of the two camps in more than a week of anti-government protests. It erupted after Mubarak went on national television the night before and rejected demands he step down immediately and said he would serve out the remaining seven months of his term.

Wednesday morning, a military spokesman appeared on state TV Wednesday and asked the protesters to disperse so life in Egypt could get back to normal. The announcement could mark a major turn in the attitude of the army, which for the past two days has allowed protests to swell, reaching their largest size yet on Tuesday when a quarter-million peace packed into Cairo’s central Tahrir Square.

Nearly 10,000 protesters massed again in Tahrir on Wednesday morning, rejecting Mubarak’s speech as too little too late and renewed their demands he leave immediately.

In the early afternoon Wednesday, an Associated Press reporter saw around 3,000 Mubarak supporters break through a human chain of anti-government protesters trying to defend thousands gathered in Tahrir.

Chaos erupted as they tore down banners denouncing the president. Fistfights broke out as they advanced across the massive square in the heart of the capital. The anti-government protesters grabbed Mubarak posters from the hands of the supporters and ripped them.

The two sides began hurling stones and bottles and sticks at each other, chasing each other as the protesters’ human chains moved back to try to shield the larger mass of demonstrators at the plaza’s center.

At one point, a small contingent of pro-Mubarak forces on horseback and camels rushed into the anti-Mubarak crowds, swinging whips and sticks to beat people. Protesters retaliated, dragging some from their mounts, throwing them to the ground and beating their faces bloody.

Protesters were seen running with their shirts or faces bloodied, some men and women in the crowd were weeping. A scent of tear gas wafted over the area, but it was not clear who had fired it.

The army troops who have been guarding the square had been keeping the two sides apart earlier in the day, but when the clashes erupted they did not intervene. Most took shelter behind or inside the armored vehicles and tanks stationed at the entrances to Tahrir.

Fox News has reporters on the ground, as well as analysts, who believe it’s a strong possibility Mubarak and his underlings are the ones arranging the pro-government, pro-Mubarak protests.

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Daily Benefactor News – Cairo Falls Into Near Anarchy

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Cairo Falls Into Near Anarchy – Washington Post

Tens of thousands of demonstrators swarmed central Cairo on Saturday in the largest demonstration yet against the rule of the country’s longtime autocratic leader, President Hosni Mubarak. The crowd went unchallenged by troops, who, in extraordinary scenes unfolding around the capital’s central Tahrir Square, smiled and shook hands with protesters and invited them up onto their tanks.

As a 4 p.m. curfew came and went, the square – which police had kept off-limits on Friday – was filled with people as far as the eye could see. The police seemed to have disappeared from the streets following vicious clashes the day before. The army had been hailed on the streets as a potential savior, with protesters giving soldiers thumbs up and openly imploring them to join their movement.

On Friday, the troops had appeared steadfastly neutral. Late Saturday, however, they were doing nothing to move demonstrators out of the streets, despite an earlier announcement by security services that anyone remaining in central squares or major roadways after 4 p.m. would face arrest.

Asked if they would enforce the curfew, soldiers said they would not.

“We are with the people,” said Ahmed, a 20-year-old conscript.

Soldiers accepted fruit, water and soda handed out by protesters in Tahrir Square and smiled as protesters chanted, “Go, Mubarak, go!” Children were hoisted up on tanks in the middle of the square to have their photos taken with troops as the hulking remains of the National Democratic Party headquarters building, home to Mubarak’s ruling organization, burned in the background.

“These soldiers are Egyptians, too. They are suffering just like we are,” said Khalid Ezz el-Din, a 50-year-old businessman who had come to the square to demand Mubarak step down.

Shortly afterward, a convoy of tanks rolled into the square, with as many as 20 protesters riding on each one. As the soldiers smiled and flashed peace signs, the protesters shouted “We are one!” and “Down with Mubarak!”

Earlier Saturday, there had been widespread looting in some neighborhoods of the capital – including the city’s upscale shopping district and the well-to-do suburbs. Government authorities blamed protesters run amok. But demonstrators claimed the destruction was perpetrated by plainclothes employees of the ruling National Democratic Party bent on sowing chaos to discredit the burgeoning pro-democracy campaign.

“We haven’t even broken a lamp,” said Mohammed Yahya, 23, a student protester. “All of this chaos is caused by the government, so they distort our image.”

In addition to waving banners reading, “Down with Mubarak,” protesters displayed new placards Saturday that read, “No looting.”

Aside from the army, there were few signs of government presence in the streets Saturday, although scattered loyalists remained. On one busy downtown street, a Mubarak supporter dressed in a finely tailored suit attempted to wipe away anti-government graffiti that had been sprayed on the burned-out carcass of an armored personnel carrier.

The capital had descended into near-anarchy Friday night, as the government sent riot police, and then the army, to quell protests by tens of thousands of demonstrators.

“We’re not going to stop until Mubarak leaves Egypt. We won’t accept anything less,” said Dalia Fou-ad, 29, who said she had participated in this week’s protests and would continue to do so.

Fou-ad and other demonstrators angrily dismissed as insufficient Mubarak’s after-midnight speech Saturday. In the nationally televised address, the president – who had not spoken publicly since the protests began Tuesday – announced he would dismiss his cabinet, but gave no hint that he intends to yield to protesters’ demand that he give up office. Egyptian state television said the cabinet officially resigned Saturday.

President Obama said a short time after Mubarak’s speech that he had talked with the Egyptian leader after he spoke and pressed him to make long-promised reforms. “What is needed are concrete steps to advance the rights of the Egyptian people,” Obama said.

News services, citing unnamed Egyptian officials, reported Saturday that 30 to 35 people, including 10 policemen, were killed in the week’s protests and that medical officals said 2,000 people had been injured. However, the casualty figures were impossible to verify.

Cellphone service was restored Saturday morning, 24 hours after a government-ordered communications blackout aimed at stopping Friday’s protests. Internet access remained blocked.

Smoke billowed Saturday from the hulking remains of the National Democratic Party headquarters building, home to Mubarak’s ruling organization. The building – a prominent symbol of 82-year-old Mubarak’s autocratic 30-year rule – was reduced to little more than a smoldering mound of concrete.

It remained unclear what role the Egyptian military might play. Mubarak, a former air force officer, draws much of his strength from the military, and any decision by the armed forces to withdraw support would mean the certain end of his rule.

But unlike the police, which unleashed an arsenal of weapons against the demonstrators, the military did not take any immediate action, and protesters gleefully welcomed the soldiers’ arrival in a thundering of personnel carriers.

Protesters were honking their horns in celebration and roaming freely through central parts of the city late in the evening, in defiance of a strict curfew. The night air was thick with black smoke, and the sounds of explosions, gunshots, sirens, cries and occasional cheers echoed through the darkness.

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A note to those who think all Muslims are bad

Y’all know who you are, and as I have said before you are wrong, yes far too many Muslims engage in, or supoport, or condone Jihadism, but certainly not all

Credit where credit is due. These are good people.

Egypt’s majority Muslim population stuck to its word Thursday night. What had been a promise of solidarity to the weary Coptic community, was honoured, when thousands of Muslims showed up at Coptic Christmas eve mass services in churches around the country and at candle light vigils held outside.

From the well-known to the unknown, Muslims had offered their bodies as “human shields” for last night’s mass, making a pledge to collectively fight the threat of Islamic militants and towards an Egypt free from sectarian strife.

“We either live together, or we die together,” was the sloganeering genius of Mohamed El-Sawy, a Muslim arts tycoon whose cultural centre distributed flyers at churches in Cairo Thursday night, and who has been credited with first floating the “human shield” idea.

Among those shields were movie stars Adel Imam and Yousra, popular preacher Amr Khaled, the two sons of President Hosni Mubarak, and thousands of citizens who have said they consider the attack one on Egypt as a whole.

“This is not about us and them,” said Dalia Mustafa, a student who attended mass at Virgin Mary Church on Maraashly. “We are one. This was an attack on Egypt as a whole, and I am standing with the Copts because the only way things will change in this country is if we come together.”