Noted Publicity Whore with Bad Hair might run in 2016

Good Grief can’t this carnival barker just go away?

Tell us how you really feel, Donald.

American businessman Donald Trump tweeted out on Tuesday,
“The last thing this country needs is another Bush.”

He’s obviously not alone on that.

The Donald spoke to a crowd at the Marriott Marquis in Washington this week. He has hinted that he will travel to Iowa to test the waters.

Donald Trump charmed hundreds of suits Monday night at the Marriott Marquis in downtown Washington. It was the “Winter Dinner” for The Economic Club of Washington, D.C. Wearing a dark suit, one of his own Trump-branded blue striped ties and the infamous bird’s nest hairdo, he sat for an on-stage interview with club president David Rubenstein, who he periodically showered with compliments.

Rubenstein began with a burning question: “It’s rumored that you’re thinking of going to Iowa soon,” he said, alluding to Trump’s ongoing presidential aspirations.

In fact, he is. For politics and real estate.

No, we do not need Jeb in 2016, or Romney and Trump is using that to play attention whore again. That is what he does, and sadly some people see to actually consider him sincere. I have said it before, I would not trust Trump as far as I can throw his massive ego. Sure, he is saying the obvious, acting as if he has struck some brilliant piece of insight. But he has not, he is about himself, period! As bad as Bush in 2016 would be, Trump would be worse. We have some REAL genuine men of convictions that may run, Perry, Walker, Cruz, to name a few. The last thing we should do is give any thought to taking Mr. Look At Me seriously

Ed’s 2014 List Of College Football Bowl Games That Probably Won’t Suck


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Boca Raton Bowl (December 23rd – 6:00 pm)
Marshall Thundering Herd
vs. Northern Illinois Huskies

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Sun Bowl (December 27th – 2:00 pm)
Arizona State Sun Devils
vs, Duke Blue Devils

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Holiday Bowl (December 27th – 8:00 pm)
Nebraska Cornhuskers
vs. USC Trojans

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Liberty Bowl (December 29th – 2:00 pm)
West Virginia Mountaineers
vs. Texas A&M Aggies

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Athletic Bowl (December 29th – 5:30 pm)
Oklahoma Sooners
vs. Clemson Tigers

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Music City Bowl (December 30th – 3:00 pm)
Notre Dame Fighting Irish
vs. LSU Tigers

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Belk Bowl (December 30th – 6:30 pm)
Louisville Cardinals
vs. Georgia Bulldogs

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Peach Bowl (December 31st – 12:30 pm)
Ole Miss Rebels
vs. TCU Horned Frogs

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Fiesta Bowl (December 31st – 4:00 pm)
Boise State Broncos
vs. Arizona Wildcats

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Orange Bowl (December 31st – 8:00 pm)
Mississippi State Bulldogs
vs. Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets

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Outback Bowl (January 1st – 12:00 pm)
Wisconsin Badgers
vs. Auburn Tigers

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Cotton Bowl (January 1st – 12:30 pm)
Michigan State Spartans
vs. Baylor Bears

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Rose Bowl (January 1st – 5:00 pm)
Oregon Ducks
vs. Florida State Seminoles

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Sugar Bowl (January 1st – 8:30 pm)
Alabama Crimson Tide
vs. Ohio State Buckeyes

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Alamo Bowl (January 2nd – 6:45 pm)
Kansas State Wildcats
vs. UCLA Bruins

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National Championship Game (January 12th – 8:30 pm)
Oregon Ducks or Florida State Seminoles
vs. Alabama Crimson Tide or Ohio State Buckeyes

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5 Of Top 8 College Football Teams Go Down To Defeat

Week Of Upsets Turns College Football Upside Down: Who Is No. 1? – Bleacher Report

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It was advertised as must-see, the first meaningful – and potentially impactful – week of the youthful college football season. Oftentimes these instances provide more sizzle than steak, Week 6 was a glaring, glorious exception. It was madness. It was historic.

Take that AP Top 25 Poll from last week and toss it in the nearest wastebasket or fireplace. It will do you no good now. After 11 ranked teams (that’s almost half) fell in one weekend, we’ll have to go back to the drawing board.

It began with No. 2 Oregon on Thursday night. The Ducks, even as more than a three-touchdown favorite coming off a bye and playing at home, were unable to hold off Rich Rodriguez and the Arizona Wildcats.

Texas A&M, the nation’s No. 6 team heading into Week 6, fell to Mississippi State in Starkville, albeit as a slight underdog. And to ensure that the entire state of Mississippi had something to celebrate, Ole Miss took out Alabama – the No. 3 team – prompting a field takeover for the ages.

Just as the chaos of Oxford was setting in, TCU took out No. 4 Oklahoma following a blitz of touchdowns and turnovers. And, to cap off a day of carnage, Utah took down No. 8 UCLA on a missed last-second field goal.

The result is pure, unaltered chaos and the first major shakeup of a season that still has so much more to give. Given the scenario, it also makes the search for the nation’s No. 1 team a taxing task.

As for the unbeaten contenders worthy of consideration, let’s explore the options.

FLORIDA STATE

Until further notice, this is the No. 1 team. Florida State has acquired that label, and it didn’t change on Saturday. Now, despite the label, the Seminoles haven’t looked the part of the nation’s top team for much of this season, although one of the alternatives to winning ugly is losing outright. (See: Above.)

Florida State started slow once again against Wake Forest – one of the country’s most anemic offenses – but quickly pulled away after some initial struggles. The defense played its best game, albeit against a unit it should look good against, and the offense eventually picked up the pace.

But Jameis Winston, at least by the absurd standards he set last year, has struggled. The offensive line has had issues. The defense, at times, has looked vulnerable.

And yet, Florida State still has more overall talent than just about any other team. It simply comes down to putting it together. More importantly, it comes down to staying unbeaten, and the Seminoles have managed to do just that.

Until that changes, regardless of the style points attached, Florida State isn’t going anywhere.

AUBURN

It’s no longer just a really fast, talented offense. The Auburn defense has taken enormous strides in 2014, something that was evident in an ugly win against Kansas State earlier this year and on Saturday in a blowout win against LSU.

The Tigers, having put it in cruise control for much of the season, showed off their next level against Les Miles’ youth-infused group on Saturday night.

Quarterback Nick Marshall showed the full range of skills that make him (and this team) dangerous. With multiple touchdowns passing and rushing on Saturday, Marshall showcased his advanced versatility that will continue to keep defenses honest. He also has a lovely buffet of weapons around him.

If Marshall’s defense can come close to matching the production it has delivered early on, this team will be incredibly difficult to beat.

With many meaningful conference games on the horizon – including an enormous tussle against Mississippi State next week – Auburn will have ample opportunities to validate its inclusion in this discussion.

Speaking of…

MISSISSIPPI STATE

It’s time to start viewing Mississippi State as more than just a good story. And really, this conversation should have started before Week 6.

Following its dominating 48-31 victory over Texas A&M – and it wasn’t even that close – the Bulldogs have thrown their name in the ring when it comes to consideration for the top team in the country.

We don’t hand out October Heismans, thankfully, but you could make the argument that quarterback Dak Prescott would be your winner if the award was handed out Saturday. That’s a fancy way of highlighting his incredible production, and his five-touchdown game against A&M was an extension of what he’s done all season.

Add in running back Josh Robinson – maybe the nation’s most underrated back – and offensively this group has been sensational. With the defense playing the way it is, particularly up front, it’s hard to find any glaring holes with this roster.

With Auburn on deck, the celebration will be short. The Bulldogs, no longer content with a “nice” season, are on the verge of something far greater.

OLE MISS

When you beat Alabama, you get noticed. That’s not the only reason why Ole Miss warrants your consideration as the nation’s top team, although it’s a fabulous place to start.

The Rebels’ 23-17 victory over the Crimson Tide was a good synopsis of what they’ve done all year. The defense might be the best in the country or, at the very least, one of the most athletic.

The offense, led by quarterback Bo Wallace, hasn’t been embraced quite the same way. After Wallace threw two fourth-quarter touchdown passes on Saturday, however, that might change. Still, the reputation surrounding his inconsistent play will continue, even if he’s tired of hearing it, a sentiment echoed in his comments, courtesy of The Clarion-Ledger’s Riley Blevin:

Like its in-state rival, Ole Miss won’t have to wait long to back up this talk. Hugh Freeze’s team will visit a hungry Texas A&M next week, as the SEC West gauntlet continues.

We’ve been waiting for Freeze’s recruiting success to develop into something more. With no ceiling in sight yet, it would appear that this time is now.

OTHER TEAMS TO CONSIDER

Baylor: The Bears offense was stagnant for much of the first half against the Texas Longhorns, although the defense stepped up and has been better than anticipated. With Oklahoma’s loss, Baylor is suddenly the favorite in the Big 12. There’s plenty of work to be done – including a road game against the Sooners along with a lively and alive TCU squad – although the Bears have done more than simply survive.

Notre Dame: At this point, perhaps it’s a stretch to anoint the Irish as the nation’s top team. And yet, Notre Dame’s victory against the Stanford Cardinal in brutal conditions highlighted the various ways this team can win. It’s so much more than quarterback Everett Golson; this defense has played fabulously thus far.

An Array of One-Loss Teams: We’re breaking the rules here, but it’s important we do so. Look at your calendar. It is early October. So much can and will happen over the next few months, which is something this sport has taught you time and time again.

A loss isn’t the end of the world, especially with the debut of a four-team playoff. While it can be an enormous, telling setback, the beauty of it all is the finish line is still nowhere in sight.

THE VERDICT

Given the limited sample size that suddenly seems exponentially larger, give me Auburn as the nation’s No. 1 team after six weeks of college football.

The programs listed above – as well as others not mentioned – could all make strong cases as the top team in the country. With Auburn becoming more balanced each week, however, I’ll give the Tigers a slight edge at the moment.

But, as chaos looms, we’ll see how long this lasts.

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Ed’s Big List Of Free Online College Courses, Audio/Video Lectures, And eBooks


FREE ONLINE COURSES
Oedb.org
OpenCulture.com
Diyscholar.Wordpress.com
Coursera.org
Edx.org
Open.edu
Oli.Cmu.edu
AcademicEarth.org
AcademicEarth.org 2
Alison.com
KhanAcademy.org
Extension.Washington.edu
CovenantSeminary.edu
Whatcom.Ctc.edu
Education-Portal.com
Education-Portal.com 2
Sofia.Fhda.edu
My.GordonConwell.edu
Saylor.org
TopFreeClasses.com
Mooc2Degree.com
Canvas.net
OnlineCollegeCourses.net
MarcAndAngel.com
OnlineCollegeClasses.com
Class-Central.com
WorldScienceU.com
PyroElectro.com

IVY LEAGUE
Online.Hillsdale.edu
Ocw.Mit.edu
Webcast.Berkeley.edu
Itunes.Stanford.edu
Extension.Harvard.edu
Ocw.Tufts.edu
Is.Byu.edu
Princeton.edu
Oyc.Yale.edu

FREE ONLINE BOOKS
ReadAnyBook.com
Gutenberg.org
Free-Ebooks.net
GoodReads.com
TechDupportAlert.com
Bartleby.com
Archive.org
PageByPageBooks.com
Bibliomania.com
Monergism.com
BaenEbooks.com
ReadPrint.com
ManyBooks.net
Archives.gov
Online-Literature.com
FreeComputerBooks.com
Librivox.org
Authorama.com
WorldPublicLibrary.org
Questia.com
En.Wikibooks.org
Read.gov
OpenLibrary.org
Sacred-Texts.com
Files.Nyu.edu
Digital.Library.Upenn.edu


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You Can’t Make This Stuff Up… Zombie Studies Gain Ground On College Campuses

Zombie Studies Gain Ground On College Campuses – Wall Street Journal

Kyle Bishop figured it was risky when he applied to a University of Arizona Ph.D. program in English eight years ago by proposing a dissertation on zombie movies.

He was dead wrong.

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The program approved Mr. Bishop’s proposal, and he is now chairman of Southern Utah University’s English department. The 40-year-old has been invited to give zombie lectures in Hawaii, Canada and Spain.

“It’s clearly now acceptable to study zombies seriously,” he says.

Just as zombies – those mythical revived corpses hungry for living human flesh and gray matter – have infiltrated pop culture, they have also gotten their hands on our brainiest reserves: the academy.

Mr. Bishop is among an advancing horde of scholars who, compelled by the cultural history and metaphor of the undead, are teaching and conducting research in disciplines from economics to religion to medicine.

The last five years have seen 20 new scholarly books with “zombie” in the title or topic category, according to Baker & Taylor, a distributor of academic and other books; in the 10 prior years, there were 10. JSTOR, an online archive of about 2,000 academic journals, says the journals have run 39 articles invoking the undead since 2005, versus seven in the preceding 10 years.

Mr. Bishop’s timing was impeccable. His dissertation coincided with a zombie onslaught that infected television, literature and other media. AMC’s TV series “The Walking Dead” is a top-rated cable show, and the 2013 zombie movie “World War Z” grossed $540 million globally.

Mr. Bishop turned his dissertation into a book, “American Zombie Gothic: The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of the Walking Dead in Popular Culture,” which surprised everyone when over 1,000 copies sold. Back when he proposed his dissertation, he says, “nobody would touch the zombie.”

Now, zombies thrive on campuses like California State University, East Bay, in Hayward. Christopher Moreman, a philosophy professor there, co-edited a two-volume collection of essays on “the Humanity of the Walking Dead” and “Cross-Cultural Appropriations” of the monsters. The initial plan was for one volume, he says, but over 100 proposals arrived.

When Mr. Moreman worked the theme into a course – “Philosophy 3432: Religion, Monsters and Horror” – he says he drew 55 students vying for 35 spots.

In one class, students read his work examining Buddhist imagery in zombie movies, which echo the religion’s meditation on mortality, he says, because “you recognize that everything’s temporary and zombies keep going on and on.”

Some find the trend ominous. There is a “danger” when scholars probe subjects like zombies, says Mark Bauerlein, an English professor and author of “The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future.”

“They end up invariably turning their attention away from the tradition,” he says, “the classics, the works that have survived the test of time.”

Michael Poliakoff, who directs policy for the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, says the proliferation of undergraduate courses in topics like zombies and vampires is helping ruin American students’ brains. Citing various studies, Mr. Poliakoff says many U.S. college graduates still lack proficiency in basic verbal literacy.

“What have we given up in order to dabble in the undead?” he says. “We’ve given up survival skills.”

Last year, some parents objected to an optional reading class at Armand Larive Middle School in Hermiston, Ore., using materials describing a “zombie apocalypse.” The district eliminated the material, says Superintendent Dr. Fred Maiocco, and “we extend our regrets to anyone offended.”

Zombie scholars say their subject is worthy of study because the living deads’ history and ubiquity in modern literature and culture present metaphors ripe for analysis.

Self-described “zombie scholar” Sarah Juliet Lauro, a Clemson University assistant English professor, acknowledges that some think it is silly or inappropriate to study the ghouls.

She counters that “it’s a deeply important mythology that is specifically about slavery.” She is finishing a book tracing zombie folklore to its 18th-century roots in the Haitian Revolution. Zombis were field laborers raised from the dead who led a slave rebellion.

Her book, “The Transatlantic Zombie: Slavery, Rebellion and Living Death,” examines how zombies came to represent the struggles of slavery and colonialism.

A former student of Ms. Lauro’s, 34-year-old Christopher Schuster, says studying zombies analytically in her class “struck a chord.” An Iraq War veteran, he saw parallels to post-traumatic stress disorder. “A single bite changes you from my best friend to someone who’s trying to kill me,” he says, adding that war “can take a child and turn him into a tormented man.”

Zombies are staggering into many fields. Last year, English professor Sherryl Vint at the University of California, Riverside, and a grad student called for submissions to “an edited volume on zombies in comics and graphic novels through the lens of medical discourse.”

The editors “seek to move beyond merely identifying the similarities between the etiology of infectious disease and zombie plagues to question how medical discourse constructs and is constructed by popular iconography of the boundaries of life, illness and health.”

Other collections due this year include “Economics of the Undead,” which co-editor Glen Whitman, a Cal State Northridge economics professor, says “raises issues of the use of resources” in an apocalyptic event. The work is academic, he says, but might draw readers “with a casual interest in economics.”

A media-studies anthology edited by Steve Jones, a senior lecturer at England’s Northumbria University, “seeks to investigate zombie sexuality in all its forms and manifestations.”

Max Brooks, author of hit pop-culture books like “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “World War Z” – often cited in academic works – is skeptical about exploring the undead theoretically. “It just becomes academics writing papers for other academics,” he says.

Instead, he says, “I would want a professor who would dig into the very real questions” that his own books seek to answer – such as, what steps would one take should a zombie apocalypse arrive—and “take that knowledge and apply it to the real world.”

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

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