Cell Phone Thief Calls Cops To Complain That Her Victim Won’t Stop Following Her

Police: Robber Calls Cops Because Victim Won’t Leave Her Alone – KOMO

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If she had to do it all over again, a suspected cellphone thief probably wouldn’t call the police to complain that her victim was following her and refusing to leave her alone. But, you know what they say about hindsight.

According to the Seattle Police Department, the 20-year-old suspect called 911 around 4 p.m. Saturday from a gas station parking lot in the 6600 block of Martin Luther King Junior Way South. She said a man was following her and accusing her of taking his phone.

Officers arrived to find the suspect standing with a 21-year-old man, who had multiple cuts and bruises.

According to police, the suspect told officers she and her boyfriend were sitting near the 21-year-old on a Metro bus when he woke up from a nap, accused them of stealing his cellphone and attacked them as they ran from the bus.

But according to the 21-year-old, that’s not quite how it happened. He told officers he was sitting on the bus with his eyes closed when suddenly the music he had been listening to stopped. He opened his eyes to see the suspect and a man with his phone.

The 21-year-old said he asked the couple to return his phone only to have them punch and kick him in the head. He told officers the couple ran off the bus,, and he followed them. He said the other man kept running, while the suspect stopped to call 911.

According to police, the suspect denied taking the victim’s phone until officers noticed a phone-shaped bulge in her pocket. Officers reportedly found both the victim’s phone and three grams of crack on the suspect.

She was booked into King County Jail for investigation of robbery and drug possession.

The victim was taken to Harborview Medical Center for treatment.

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Cops, Mother Of Infant, Rabbi, And Little League Coach Among 70 Rounded Up In Child Porn Ring Bust

Rabbi, Little League Coach, Law Officers Among 70 Arrested In Online Child Porn Ring – WNBC

A rabbi, a little league coach, law enforcement and security officers and the mother of an infant are among 70 people arrested for allegedly sharing child pornography images online in what authorities are calling one of the largest local roundups of people who anonymously trade such images on the Internet, officials say.

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Authorities said the victims who were sexually exploited and photographed range in age from newborn to 17.

Undercover Department of Homeland Security investigators along with NYPD detectives identified dozens of the suspects in about a month by setting up a website soliciting the sharing of illicit images.

Dozens of New York-area men allegedly uploaded or file-shared the illicit pictures without knowing they were doing so on a law enforcement website, authorities said.

One woman from New Jersey has also been arrested for allegedly using Skype to pose her young child in compromising positions.

Homeland Security investigators along with the NYPD Commissioner and several New York City district attorneys are expected to announce the charges at a news conference Wednesday afternoon.

Authorities say advances in technology and computer capacity have allowed child-porn collectors to more easily amass vast troves of disturbing images and to exchange files with each other directly. The New York effort resulted in the seizure of nearly 600 desktop and laptop computers, tablets, smartphones and other devices containing a total of 175 terabytes of storage.

Agents are still examining the devices to locate and catalog evidence – an arduous task that could result in more arrests. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children also will use its analysts to review the images to see whether it can identify children using databases of known victims.

“We refer to each of these images as a crime scene photo because that’s exactly what they are,” said John Ryan, the organization’s chief executive officer.

Authorities decided to launch the operation after the January arrest of the former police chief of suburban Mount Pleasant, Brian Fanelli, who pleaded not guilty this week to federal charges of knowingly receiving and distributing child pornography.

Court papers allege that Fanelli told investigators he began looking at child porn as research before it grew into a “personal interest.”

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Court: Cops Can Kick In Your Door And Seize Your Guns Without A Warrant If They Feel It’s In Your Best Interest

Shock FedGov Court Ruling: Police Can Kick In Your Door And Seize Guns Without Warrant Or Charges – Daily Sheeple

The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals may have just dealt a serious blow to the U.S. Constitution.

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In a unanimous decision earlier this month the Court determined that law enforcement officers are not required to present a warrant or charges before forcibly entering a person’s home, searching it and confiscating their firearms if they believe it is in the individual’s best interests.

The landmark suit was brought before the court by Krysta Sutterfield of Milwaukee, who had recently visited a psychiatrist for outpatient therapy resulting from some bad news that she had received. According to court records Sutterfield had expressed a suicidal thought during the visit, perhaps tongue-in-cheek, when she said “I guess I’ll go home and blow my brains out.” This prompted her doctor to contact police.

For several hours the police searched for Sutterfield, speaking with neighbors and awaiting her return home. They received an update from her psychiatrist who said that Sutterfield had contacted her and advised that she was not in need of assistance and to “call off” the search, which the doctor did not agree to. Police eventually left and Sutterfield returned home, only to be visited later that evening by the lead detective on the case:

Krysta Sutterfield vs. city of Milwaukee, et al.

Sutterfield answered Hewitt’s knock at the front door but would not engage with her, except to state repeatedly that she had “called off” the police and to keep shutting the door on Hewitt. Sutterfield would not admit Hewitt to the residence, and during the exchange kept the outer storm door closed and locked. Unable to gain admittance to the house, Hewitt concluded that the police would have to enter it forcibly.

Sutterfield called 911 in an effort to have the officers leave; as a result of that call, the ensuing events were recorded by the emergency call center. Sutterfield can be heard on the recording telling the officers that she was fine and that she did not want anyone to enter her residence.

After informing Sutterfield of his intention to open the storm door forcibly if she did not unlock it herself, Berken yanked the door open and entered the house with the other officers to take custody of Sutterfield pursuant to the statement of detention. A brief struggle ensued.

Sutterfield can be heard on the 911 recording demanding both that the officers let go of her and that they leave her home. (Sutterfield would later say that the officers tackled her.) Sutterfield was handcuffed and placed in the officers’ custody.

At that point the officers conducted a protective sweep of the home. In the kitchen, officer James Floriani observed a compact disc carrying case in plain view. He picked up the soft-sided case, which was locked, and surmised from the feel and weight of its contents that there might be a firearm inside. He then forced the case open and discovered a semi-automatic handgun inside; a yellow smiley-face sticker was affixed to the barrel of the gun, covering the muzzle. Also inside the case were concealed-carry firearm licenses from multiple jurisdictions other than Wisconsin. Elsewhere in the kitchen the officers discovered a BB gun made to realistically resemble a Glock 29 handgun.

The contents of the case were seized along with the BB gun and placed into police inventory for safekeeping.

Berken would later state that he authorized the seizure of the handgun in order to keep them out of the hands of a juvenile, should a juvenile enter the house unaccompanied by an adult while Sutterfield remained in the hospital.

Sutterfield subsequently filed a lawsuit against the City of Milwaukee with the district court, a case that was initially dismissed. She then filed an appeal with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th District claiming that her Second and Fourth Amendment rights were violated.

In a 75-page opinion the court, while pointing out that the intrusion against Sutterfield was profound, sided with the city of Milwaukee:

“The intrusions upon Sutterfield’s privacy were profound,” Judge Ilana Rovner wrote for three-judge panel.

“At the core of the privacy protected by the Fourth Amendment is the right to be let alone in one’s home.”

But the court also found, that on the other hand, “There is no suggestion that (police) acted for any reason other than to protect Sutterfield from harm.”

“Even if the officers did exceed constitutional boundaries,” the court document states, “they are protected by qualified immunity.”

As noted by Police State USA, the court may have just created a legal loophole for law enforcement officials around the country, giving them immunity from Constitutional violations if they merely suggest that exigent circumstances exist and that they are acting in the best interests of the health and safety of an alleged suspect, regardless of Constitutional requirements:

In short, Sutterfield’s privacy (which was admittedly encroached upon) was left unprotected by the Bill of Rights because of the “exigent circumstances” in which police executed an emergency detention – with no warrant, no criminal charges, and no input from the judiciary. Similarly, the gun confiscation was also deemed as acceptable due to the so-called “emergency” which police claimed had been taking place for 9 consecutive hours.

The federal ruling affirms a legal loophole which allows targeted home invasions, warrantless searches, and gun confiscations that rest entirely in the hands of the Executive Branch. The emergency aid doctrine enables police to act without a search warrant, even if there is time to get one. When the government wants to check on someone, his or her rights are essentially suspended until the person’s sanity has been forcibly validated.

The implications of the courts legal decision are alarmingly broad. Though this particular case involved exigent circumstances in which an individual suggested she wanted to commit suicide, albeit tongue-in-cheek, the court’s opinion suggests that such tactics can be applied for any “emergency” wherein police subjectively determine that an individual may be a danger to themselves or others.

Under new statutes passed by the federal government these emergencies and dangers could potentially include any number of scenarios. Senator Rand Paul recently highlighted that there are laws on the books that categorize a number of different activities as having the potential for terrorism, including things like purchasing bulk ammunition. Last month, when a group of concerned citizens assembled at Bundy Ranch in Nevada to protest government overreach, Senator Harry Reid dubbed them “domestic terrorists.” Even paying with cash or complaining about chemicals in water can land an American on the terror watch list. Non-conformists who do not subscribe to the status quo can now be considered mentally insane according to psychiatrists’ Diagnostic and Statistics Manual of Mental Disorders.

Law enforcement has an almost unlimited amount of circumstances they can cite to justify threats to one’s self or others, and thus, to ignore Constitutional requirements when serving at the behest of the local, state or federal government.

Have the Federal Court’s latest decision made it possible for these vaguely defined suspicious activities to be molded into exigent circumstances that give police the right to enter homes without due process, confiscate legally owned personal belongings, and detain residents without charge?

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Man Calls Power Company To Complain About Service, Accidentally Leads Cops To His Own Pot-Growing Operation

Orange Co. Homeowner Allegedly Leads Authorities To His Own Grow House – WFTV

An Orange County homeowner called the power company to report a problem, and ended up leading them straight to a major marijuana grow house, authorities said.

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Investigators said they carried out more than 100 pot plants from the home in the Canyon Ridge subdivision near Clarcona-Ocoee Road.

When Channel 9’s Kristyn Caddell went to the home, the odor of marijuana was so pungent, she could smell it from across the street.

Investigators were at the home all night Wednesday removing the plants from the top floor of the home.

They said there was so much marijuana in the home, that there was very little living space.

“They were actually remodeling the back room into another grow operation, which was going to be even larger,” said Robert white with the Corporal Narcotics Tip Squad.

Neighbors watched in awe as the plants were being carried out.

Norm Pozzie said he never noticed the pungent smell, but did see a lot of expensive cars and well-dressed people stopping by the house on a regular basis.

When the homeowner called the power company to report an electrical short, officials with Duke Energy noticed the lines had been tampered with.

The man was allegedly running some illegal power to the home to run his grow house, but it shorted out his power.

“We know who lives here, we know who paid for everything and we know who set it up,” White said.

Investigators said they will be putting out a warrant for the man’s arrest.

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Elderly Man Who Called For Ambulance For Sick Wife Gets Crap Beat Out Of Him By Cops

Elderly Man Calls For Ambulance For Wife, Gets Beaten By Police – Daily Dose

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A Humansville, MO resident got some inhumane treatment from his local police department. Elbert Breshears, 78, called for an ambulance when his wife, who suffers from dementia, was having an episode. The police arrived first and things heated up in a hurry. The video has some commentary that lasts for 14 seconds, it isn’t me but that was the only version of the video available on YouTube.

Breshears details how he and his wife were standing at the edge of his yard, next to the road, talking and waiting for the ambulance to arrive. Her episode involved her waving an arm and calling for help. She was doing that when the police showed up and her husband had his back to the direction the officers came from.

Breshears said he was holding on to his wife’s right arm, talking to her when suddenly an officer knocked him to the ground. The officer then told him to get up, and Breshears said he told the officer that he couldn’t.

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Breshears reports that the officers then took him, one by each arm, lifting him up and throwing him into a gravel area. He said one of the officers sat on his back, at waist level and the other sat on his head.

They were trying to handcuff him and he says he told them he can’t physically get his arms into that position, if they’ll let him up they can cuff him, saying “I’ve got no objection to being handcuffed,” he just can’t get there from the position he was in.

That’s when the paramedics arrived and the couple was transported to the hospital. Breshears had to have gravel dug out of his head at the hospital and required stitches.

Breshears says, “I didn’t know what to think, I’ve never had nobody come up on me for doing nothing. You can’t talk to the officers, they won’t talk to you.”

As if to prove his point, the reporter then details how she attempted to speak with both the police chief and the mayor and neither would talk to her. She was able to speak to the police chief on the phone; he restricted his comments to a statement of the charges against Breshears: Elder Abuse, Refusing Arrest, and Assaulting a Police Officer.

Mr. Breshears told the reporter, “I don’t hit my wife, I’ve been with her forty something years, I love the woman. She can’t help what she does.” He continued, “That’s what I was trying to do was do my job, and this is what I got for it.”

Breshears is looking for a lawyer to press his case against the city.

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Bill To Punish Gun-Seizing Cops Passes Unanimously In Idaho Senate

Bill To Punish Gun-Seizing Cops Gets Full Senate Support – KBOI2

A bill to punish law enforcement officers who obey a hypothetical federal mandate to seize the firearms of Idaho citizens found no opposition on the Senate floor.

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Lawmakers voted 34-0 in favor of the bill Wednesday, clearing its path to the House.

Sen. Steve Vick, a Dalton Gardens Republican who co-sponsors the bill with Meridian Republican Marv Hagedorn, touts it as a way to ensure Idahoans’ Second Amendment rights are protected.

The proposal is a response to fears that President Barack Obama will ban some guns.

Hagedorn has previously said he knows of no such federal measure in the works.

The bill is similar to one sponsored by then-Rep. Mark Patterson who has since resigned from the legislature. That bill passed the House, but died in the Senate.

Lawmakers and law enforcement credit new wording with taking much of the controversy out of the measure.

The measure won’t affect agreements between state and federal agencies that collaborate on gang and drug investigations.

Likewise, officers who confiscate felons’ firearms won’t get in any trouble.

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Pregnant Woman Under Arrest For Shoplifting Asks Cops If She Can Do Some Heroin

Police: Woman Under Arrest Asks Cops If She Can Do Heroin – Chicago Tribune

A 33-year-old Minnesota woman stopped for shoplifting Monday night at a West Side Walmart found herself in bigger trouble after she asked arresting police officers if she could do some heroin, police said.

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Edith Hancock, of the 3000 block of Riverwood Drive in Hastings, Minn., was charged with felony possession of a controlled substance and misdemeanor retail theft, police said.

Hancock, who told police she was three months pregnant, was seen going into a changing room at the Walmart at 4650 W. North Ave. with a pair of jeans, leggings, and a black shirt and then leave the changing area wearing those items, according to police.

After taking some cosmetics and placing them in her purse, she tried to leave the store without paying and was stopped by security, according to police. Chicago police were called and she was taken to the Grand Central District station where she was arrested at 7 p.m., according to police.

While she was being processed, she “continually asked” officers for “just one blow,” a street name for heroin, from her purse because she was “getting dopesick,” according to a police report.

Officers found multiple bags of heroin in her purse, and she continued saying that she “only wanted one” of the bags “because she had ten of them and she thought they might be more than a gram although a couple were very light because she had already used from a least a couple,” the report said.

Hancock was released on a signature bond during a hearing today before Judge Donald Panarese at the Leighton Criminal Court building. She is scheduled to appear in court next on Feb. 18.

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