Check out a new Blog from Chris Wysocki

Chris is a fine blogger, and a blogging friend of this fine blog, so, I urge you to go check out his new venture, “He’s Pretty Fly For a Jersey Guy”

Also check out Wyblog where Chris expresses his feelings on Jason Collins, Gay NBA player/Publicity seeker/hero of the Left

What team wouldn’t beat a path to his door, now that Jason Collins has courageously admitted that he’s gay?

Pardon my cynicism, but c’mon already, it’s pure marketing genius. Being homosexual doesn’t make him a better basketball player. But being The First Gay Basketball Player? When he’s a free agent journeyman nearing the end of his career? We’re talking signing bonus, baby!

If he’s not picked up, the NBA is homophobic.

If he’s not paid more than his team’s average salary, the NBA is homophobic.

If he’s benched, or cut, the NBA is homophobic.

Plus, having The First Gay NBA Player on your roster is guaranteed to sell lots of tickets. Or the fans are homophobic.

Brilliant!

I, of course, have my own thoughts on Jason Collins. First, and foremost. I had one reaction when I heard the media blowing this story out of proportion. That thought was “who freaking cares!” Sorry to let ESPN and the rest of the sports, and news media in on a secret, but America could not care less who this guy, or any other player sleeps with. I know the media loves to pretend that America is Homopobic so they can pretend that this story really matters. But, again, most of us do not care a whit about this story! I would also add that if the media really wants a BIG story, let them find the first WNBA player to come out as straight, now that might shock some folks.

Seriously though, look for Collins to have a book deal, and get some media spotlight. And while I am not saying that is all this is about, I am betting it is a large part of it. And no amount of the media calling this man a hero, or brave, is going to change reality. And that reality is no one really cares if he is Gay.

 

Thuggery you say?

A Nod to the Gods compares the bad behavior of NBA players and NFL players, and comes up with some shocking results

36 have been accused of spousal abuse

7 have been arrested for fraud

19 have been accused of writing bad checks

117 have directly or indirectly bankrupted at least 2 businesses

3 have done time for assault

71 cannot get a credit card due to bad credit

14 have been arrested on drug-related charges

8 have been arrested! for shoplifting

21 currently are defendants in lawsuits, and 84 have been arrested for drunk driving in the last year !

OK, time to vote kids, which way do you vote?

If you said NBA, you are wrong

However if you said the NFL, you are still wrong

That abysmal record belongs not to the NBA, NFL, MLB, NHL, or any sports leagues. The real thugs do not dunk, run for TD’s steal bases, hit home runs or skate in hockey arenas. They inhabit Congress. And if you think that is a scary stat, just think about this. The people these folks are supposed to represent, keep electing them.

 

The biggest problem with the NBA? The refs!

I first watched the NBA in 1976, I was 10, and was a big fan of Dr. J, one of the all-time elite players. After watching a few years, I became familiar with the rules of the game, and, as all fans, of all sports do I took note of how the games were officiated. In short, I have come to believe that the biggest issue most fans have with the NBA is the officiating. There is no consistency, at all, ever! The calls are all over the place. The difference between a block and a charge? Who knows, the only difference seems to be the whim of the referee. Instead of calling fouls by the rule book, it seems the refs call them, or don’t according to how big  a star commits the foul, what quarter it is, somehow what IS a foul in the first half, is NOT in the 4th quarter. Frankly, it is a joke, and has been for a long time.

BC, at I’m a Man, I’m 41 got me thinking about this today. Go read his post, and his link to this book for more like this

Relationships between NBA players and referees were generally all over the board — love, hate, and everything in-between. Some players, even very good ones, were targeted by referees and the league because they were too talented for their own good. Raja Bell, formerly of the Phoenix Suns and now a member of the Charlotte Bobcats, was one of those players. A defensive specialist throughout his career, Bell had a reputation for being a “star stopper.” His defensive skills were so razor sharp that he could shut down a superstar, or at least make him work for his points. Kobe Bryant was often frustrated by Bell’s tenacity on defense. Let’s face it, no one completely shuts down a player of Kobe’s caliber, but Bell could frustrate Kobe, take him out of his game, and interrupt his rhythm.

You would think that the NBA would love a guy who plays such great defense. Think again! Star stoppers hurt the promotion of marquee players. Fans don’t pay high prices to see players like Raja Bell — they pay to see superstars like Kobe Bryant score 40 points. Basketball purists like to see good defense, but the NBA wants the big names to score big points.

If a player of Kobe’s stature collides with the likes of Raja Bell, the call will almost always go for Kobe and against Bell. As part of our ongoing training and game preparation, NBA referees regularly receive game-action video tape from the league office. Over the years, I have reviewed many recorded hours of video involving Raja Bell. The footage I analyzed usually illustrated fouls being called against Bell, rarely for him. The message was subtle but clear — call fouls against the star stopper because he’s hurting the game.

If Kobe Bryant had two fouls in the first or second quarter and went to the bench, one referee would tell the other two, “Kobe’s got two fouls. Let’s make sure that if we call a foul on him, it’s an obvious foul, because otherwise he’s gonna go back to the bench. If he is involved in a play where a foul is called, give the foul to another player.”

Similarly, when games got physically rough, we would huddle up and agree to tighten the game up. So we started calling fouls on guys who didn’t really matter — “ticky-tack” or “touch” fouls where one player just touched another but didn’t really impede his progress. Under regular circumstances these wouldn’t be fouls, but after a skirmish we wanted to regain control. We would never call these types of fouls on superstars, just on the average players who didn’t have star status. It was important to keep the stars on the floor.

Tell me you NBA fans have not noticed this, go on tell me, that is what I thought. How about maker-up calls?

I remember one nightmarish game I worked with Joe Crawford and Phil Robinson. Minnesota and New Orleans were in a tight game going into the last minute, and Crawford told us to make sure that we were 100 percent sure of the call every time we blew the whistle. When play resumed, Minnesota coach Flip Saunders started yelling at us to make a call. Robinson got intimidated and blew the whistle on New Orleans. The only problem was it wasn’t the right call. Tim Floyd, the Hornets’ coach, went nuts. He stormed the court and kicked the ball into the top row of the stadium. Robinson had to throw him out, and Minnesota won the game.

[…]

Later that week, Ronnie Nunn told me that we could have made something up at the other end against Minnesota to even things out. He even got specific — maybe we should have considered calling a traveling violation on Kevin Garnett. Talk about the politics of the game! Of course the official statement from the league office will always read, “There is no such thing as a makeup call.”

The NBA really needs to address this issue.

Spurs, Lakers roll in openers

San Antonia routed Utah 106-91 and LA romped over Denver 103-88 in the opening games of their respective NBA Playoff series

SAN ANTONIO — This was not another early playoff letdown by the San Antonio Spurs. For the first time in four years, they won a series opener.

But more important to them was Tony Parker looking like his old postseason self.

Putting together his best playoff game since 2009, Parker scored 28 points and the top-seeded Spurs erased four years of putting themselves in 0-1 holes to start the playoffs, beating the Utah Jazz 106-91 in Game 1 of their first-round series Sunday.

LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 31 points, Andrew Bynum posted the Lakers’ first playoff triple-double in 21 years with an NBA postseason record-tying 10 blocked shots, and Los Angeles thoroughly controlled the tempo in a playoff-opening 103-88 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Sunday.

Bynum, the Lakers’ All-Star center coming off his best regular season, also had 10 points and 13 rebounds while incredibly blocking 11 percent of the Nuggets’ 90 shots.

Bulls whip 76ers Rose injures knee UPDATE! Rose done for season

Bulls rout 76ers 103-91 lead series 1-0

Derrick Rose scored 23 points before being helped off the court late in the game with an injured left knee, casting a major cloud over theChicago Bulls‘ 103-91 victory over the Philadelphia 76ers in Saturday’s playoff opener.

Rose crumbled to the ground after he drove the lane.

Derrick Rose

Derrick Rose (Photo credit: Keith Allison)

He was going for a layup when he came to a jump-stop and seemed to change his mind, passing off to a teammate before an awkward landing.

The Bulls played well in the regular season without Rose, but if he is out for any  length of time, they can kiss their title hopes goodbre.

UPDATE!! Rose tore his ACL, and will miss the rest of the post-season

 Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose suffered a torn ACL in his left knee and will miss the rest of the season, the team announced Saturday.

Rose suffered the injury while trying to leap off his left foot in the lane with 1:22 left in Saturday’s playoff game against the Philadelphia 76ers.

Rose was helped off the court before the Bulls sealed their 103-91 Game 1 win. Rose had 23 points, nine rebounds and nine assists when he was injured.

So, the Bulls best player was on the court, with just over a minute left, and the bulls up double digits? Good grief~!

HOW ‘Bout Them Mavs!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Whoa baby, my beloved Dallas Mavericks are now the kings of the NBA!

All the smoke and glitter, laser shows and summertime hype generated in this building 11 months ago wasn’t enough to overcome the unifying force of energy the Dallas Mavericks unleashed on this night and in this series.

In the end, the Miami Heat’s Big 3 couldn’t overcome the Mavericks’ Big Team, from one through 12.

The old school bunch that fought off the demons that fuel its own collective history of coming up short, the missed opportunities from The Finals against the Heat in 2006 and all the other postseason missteps of the past five years, walked out AmericanAirlines Arena late Sunday night with that Larry O’Brien trophy they’d all dreamed of for years.

“It feels amazing now to know that nobody can ever take this way away from us again,” Mavericks star and Finals MVP Dirk Nowitzki said, “and for one year we’re the best team that was out there. That feels amazing.”

 

What is almost as sweet as rooting for your favorite team to win?

Memphis Grizzlies logo

Image via Wikipedia

Rooting for a team you hate to lose. And last night, I enjoyed Memphis knocking the San Antonio Spurs out of the NBA Playoffs!

These Memphis Grizzliesjust keep making NBA history — and believers.

Zach Randolph had 31 points and 11 rebounds and the Grizzlies advanced to their first Western Conference semifinals and made NBA history in knocking off the top-seeded San Antonio Spurs 99-91 on Friday night.

Memphis had been the franchise best known for empty seats and the unenviable NBA mark for playoff futility at 0-12 after being swept in its first three appearances. This time, a third straight sellout crowd cheered every basket with a couple of signs begging the Grizzlies to “Finish Them” in a town desperately needing a hero.

Now if my Mavs can knock out the Lakers, I will be so happy!