Here we go again, more Leftist bullies

Seven ill-educated and misguided students at Washington 7 Lee University are offended by Robert E. Lee and are demanding “Tolerance” or something

Some Washington & Lee University law students want the university to live by its honor code and stop glorifying its namesake by acknowledging the dishonorable side of both Robert E. Lee and W&L.

Seven multiracial students, calling themselves The Committee, have demanded that W&L remove the flags of the Confederacy from the campus and Lee Chapel, acknowledge and apologize for participating in chattel slavery, recognize Martin Luther King Day on the undergraduate campus and ban neo-Confederates from marching across campus to the chapel on Lee-Jackson Day.

If their demands are not met by Sept. 1, they will engage in civil disobedience.

University President Kenneth Ruscio on Wednesday issued a letter to the W&L community that said “we take these students’ concerns seriously. The issues they have raised are important, and we intend to address them.”

Ruscio said W&L invites a prominent speaker during MLK Legacy Week; the undergraduate faculty decides whether classes are held on MLK day; the eight battle flags in Lee Chapel, representing armies of the Confederate States of America, are educational and historical, and the university does not observe Lee-Jackson Day.

His message did not indicate whether W&L would meet any of the students’ demands, but that he invited them to meet with the University Committee on Inclusiveness and Campus Climate that has been holding focus groups on these same issues.

The students said that they emailed the committee four days ago and had yet to hear a response.

The university should tell these seven cry babies to learn something about Lee. If they did they would likely be ashamed of themselves. He was an honorable man, who fought for his home, and who considered slavery an abomination, and did his best to heal the country after the war. He was also a proponent of freeing the slaves during the war, and a man who deserves to have his memory taught in total, and not through the prism of Leftist fantasy.

Generals Lee and Jackson targeted by the Central Planners

Via Moonbattery

It isn’t only lead characters on popular cable shows who need to be erased if they don’t conform to the currently enforced ideology. Historical figures need to go too — even some of the most important:

The U.S. Army War College, which molds future field generals, has begun discussing whether it should remove its portraits of Confederate generals — including those of Robert E. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson.

Was the war fought to preserve the Union or to subjugate the South? If the American heroes Lee and Jackson become unpersons, we will finally have a definitive answer.

In the end, not only the South but our entire civilization will be erased if we fail to cure it of the totalitarian mindset of those who insist that every aspect of life must comply with liberalism.

Shameful

 

Why are ignorant buffoons allowed to write columns for the Washington Post?

I ask this question only because I happened upon a historically inaccurate piece, written by John Kelly, who is, by trade, a columnist for the Washington Post. His latest piece expresses shock, shock I say, that Generals Jackson and Lee are honored as Christian soldiers at the National Cathedral

On Wednesday, mourners will gather at Washington National Cathedral to celebrate the legacy of Nelson Mandela, a man who fought for racial equality. I’m guessing most of them will have no idea they’re sitting in a place that has shrines to two people who fought against it.

I certainly know I was surprised when I learned recently that two memorial niches — complete with stained-glass windows and laudatory inscriptions — honor Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson.

Well, I am unsure where the notion that Jackson and Lee were “against” racial equality. At least any more than Saint Lincoln did. His thoughts on the inferiority of the Black race are well documented. Not that Lincoln was alone in those thoughts in the mid 19th Century. But more to the point about Jackson and Lee and their views on race. Jackson ran a school in Lexington, Virginia educating Blacks, Historian Richard William’s book on this school is a must read for those who, like Kelly, are historically clueless. Here is a link to a stories about Jackson and Lee that Kelly should also read especially this part

One Sunday in June of 1865, just after the war ended, St. Paul’s Episcopal, was packed with folks leaning on each other and God for understanding about what their future held. But they could never have imagined what would happen during the service.

When the pastor began to serve communion, a well-dressed black man came forward first.

It would be an understatement to say that the event caused a few awkward moments among the white congregants. They remained seated, except one man who went forward and knelt near him.

That man was General Robert E. Lee

The general’s actions come as no surprise to noted Civil War historian James Robertson, who says Lee was a man of duty and faith.

“His duty was to his native state, both in war and in peace,” Robertson, a history professor at Virginia Tech, said. “His faith was very deep-seated. And I think Lee was simply exhibiting both. He knew that the South had been crushed, defeated, humiliated. He knew he had a duty to himself, to his God to help reconstruct his beloved Virginia as much as he could.”

The rest of the congregation followed Lee’s example and took communion as well.

Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend?

But it’s a stained glass window that represents one of the greatest ironies of the Civil War. The window honors another prominent Confederate general: Stonewall Jackson.

The window is not in a museum. It’s proudly displayed in the predominantly black Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke, Va.

The church’s founding pastor Rev. Lylburn Downing designed the window in 1906 to honor Jackson for leading his parents to faith in Christ when they were slave children.

Prior to the Civil War, Jackson was a professor at the Virginia Military Institute, and a deacon at the Lexington Presbyterian Church.

In 1855, the man who would become one of the Civil War’s most famous generals, began a Sunday school class for black children, slave and free.

Downing’s father and mother were among his many students.

“As he saw it, slavery was something that God ordained upon black people in America for God’s own reasons,” Robertson said. “And he had no right to challenge God’s will. That was blasphemy. And so, while he hated slavery, he was opposed to slavery, Jackson had to obey his Heavenly Father and accept the system. And he accepted it through doing the Golden Rule, do unto others as he would wish they do unto him.”

Professor Miller believes Jackson’s justification of slavery on biblical grounds was wrong.

“Yet in the midst of all of that, I think that people can do good stuff, maybe for all the wrong reasons, but motivated by sincere hearts,” he said.

That sincerity is confirmed by the fact that Jackson was willing to break Virginia law by teaching the class. Even after the war began, Jackson sent money back to the church to keep the class going.

Richard Williams has documented Jackson’s ministry in a book called, Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend.

He says the Sunday school class had a generational impact.

” a number of scholars, as Jackson referred to his students, that went on to become ministers,” Williams said. “There were four churches established, three in Lexington and then this one. Two of those churches in Lexington are still vibrant ministries today.”

And when a statue at Jackson’s gravesite in Lexington was erected in 1891, it was one of Jackson’s scholars-turned-pastor who made the first contribution.

How do the members of Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church feel about a stained glass window honoring a Confederate general?

Freeland Pendleton, who’s been a member of the church most of his life, says he has no problem with it.

“The reason I was okay with it because he had the courage to teach us, teach blacks to read and write,” Pendleton said. “Whether he was fighting for slavery, or whatever, he did do a good thing.”

You can go read the rest of Kelly’s column, it is sad, very sad, that someone would choose to write a column on subject’s he knows little about.

On this day 143 years ago

One of the greatest heroes passed away as General Robert E. Lee left this world at age 63. 

Here is a talk by James Robertson, a truly great historian on Lee, given two years ago

Robertson is retired from Virginia Tech after 44 years of teaching and was named the Alumni Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus. He taught the largest Civil War history class in American higher education, with an average of 300 students per semester.

Here is a photo of the Lee Memorial at Washington Lee University

leechapellexingtonvz8

 

Your Saturday History Arrogance Does Not pay

Patton was a great general, and some might call him arrogant I found this at 90 Miles From Tyranny Pay close attention to the quote

Patton

Confidence is a necessity for a good military commander, over confidence, not so much. History is full of examples of military leaders who over estimated their, or their armies own ability. 

The quote from Patton reminded me of three Union generals that came against Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia.

General John Pope was given command of an army in the Summer of 1862. His army was to cooperate with George McClellan’s Army of the Potomac, but Lee already heavily outnumbered, set about to defeat Pope, who he called a miscreant before he could team up with McClellan. 

Pope, for his part had had some smaller successes in the Western theater. His message to the troops upon assuming command said, in part, that he had come from the West, where he had always seen the backs of his enemies. In closing he announced that anyone looking for him would find his “headquarters in the saddle”. Upon hearing this Lee remarked that Pope did not know his headquarters from his hindquarters.

In late August Lee sent Stonewall Jackson’s corps to get Pope’s attention. Jackson took a defensive position in an old railroad cut, and repulsed attack after attack from Pope. Lee, meanwhile, had arrived with James Longstreet’s corps, about 30,000 men. Pope, intent  on destroying Jackson, was unaware that Longstreet was in position to crush his flank. Despite warnings that Longstreet was on the field, Pope sent his last divisions against Jackson, opening the opportunity for Longstreet to fall upon his flank. Pope was routed, and was soon sent to Minnesota to fight Indians.

General Joseph Hooker was a far better general than Pope, and even more arrogant. After Lee had won another victory over Ambrose Burnside at Fredericksburg, Hooker replaced Burnside as commander of the Army of the Potomac. To his credit, he stole a march on Lee in late April 1863. Hooker, whose army numbered 134,000 while Lee, who would have to fight without two divisions and General Longstreet, had about 57,000. Hooker had put himself in position to possibly end the war. He announced that he had Lee where he wanted him. “Lee must ingloriously flee or come out in the open where certain destruction awaits him, may God have mercy on Bobby Lee for I will have none” 

Lee, did neither of the two things Hooker suggested. Instead he sent two divisions to attack Hooker. Hooker, rather than using his superior forces began to entrench, the bully had backed down. The next day, Lee sent Jackson around Hooker’s right flank. Jackson found Oliver Howard’s division resting completely unaware of what was about to hit them. What followed is known as Lee’s greatest victory. He wrecked his much larger opponent, and Hooker was soon replaced.

Lastly there is US Grant. He had achieved much fame and success in Tennessee, and was placed in command of all the Union armies in early 1864. He would face Lee himself, and in early May 1864, he began his campaign. Grant had heard some in his army remark that Grant had “not yet faced Bobby Lee” and that talk agitated Grant. He snapped that Lee better worry about what Grant would do to him, and added that his army talked as if Lee would do a back flip and turn Grant’s flanks and pierce his center at the same time.

At the Wilderness, on My 5th and 6th Lee attacked Grant, and oddly enough, in the battle Lee did turn both of Grant’s flanks, and almost pierced his center as well. In short Lee delivered a strategic and tactical beating to Grant. Grant, of course, was tenacious and continued to push his much smaller army South. Grant was not Pope, or Hooker, or Burnside, or McClellan. The armies would meet at Spotsylvania Courthouse, where Lee won another victory, and later at Cold Harbor, where Lee dealt Grant over 7,000 casualties in a matter of minutes. In all the first three meeting shad cost Grant as many casualties as Lee had in his entire army. In the end Grant won the war of attrition, but likely had no doubt who the better general was.

How about some history kids?

I am linking The Other McCain a lot today, maybe I am hoping for an Instalanche, but I could not resist linking Stacy McCain’s post “We need reinforcements” because in said post. McCain, a proud Southerner like myself, references the great Robert E. Lee

Robert E. Lee once famously paid tribute to the fighting ability of Texans: “I rely on Texas regiments in all tight places, and fear I have to call upon them too often. They have fought grandly, nobly.” During the Battle of the Wilderness, when it seemed the Confederate line could not hold, Lee rode his horse into the midst of the fighting to rally his troops. His soldiers urged him to go back, but Lee would not leave until reinforcements arrived. Learning that the fresh troops were from Texas, the general declared: “Texans always move them!” And so they did.

English: John Bell Hood Français : John Bell H...

General John Bell Hood 

Yes, that is one of the most famous moments in the War of Northern Aggression, as Hood’s Texas Brigade, named for General John Bell Hood,the brigade’s original commander, threw back the Union troops, but only after making sure General Lee would not personally lead the charge. The men cried “Lee to the Rear” before delivering a devastating blow to Grant’s Army of the Potomac that April 6th morning. The day, and the two day battle known as The Wilderness would end with one of the most ironic incidents of the war. 

General Longstreet, who Lee called his “War Horse” would lead a crushing flank attack that day, rolling up Union General William Hancock’s troops “like a wet blanket”. 

General James Longstreet

General James Longstreet

 

 

As Longstreet sought to press his attack before sunset, he was wounded by his own men. One year, and four days previous, on May 2, 1863, General Stone wall Jackson, seeking to press a devastating flank attack on the Army of the Potomac, was also wounded by his own men.

thomas-20j-20jackson

 

Not only were Lee’s top lieutenants wounded in a similar fashion one year apart, but also on very nearly the same spot. About one mile separates the locations.

Why yes it is a holiday here in Texas, a holiday that the politically correct should leave alone

Today, January 19, is a holiday. It is Confederate Heroes Day It falls on the birthday of Robert E.lee. similar holidays are in place around this time all over the South. Stonewall Jackson was born on Jan. 24. April also brings Confederate Memorial Days in several states. The point of these holidays has nothing to do with race, or slavery. They have one purpose, to honor the memories of the many brave men who served in the Confederate military. A good number of my ancestors served in that war. Among the regiments are the 4th south Carolina Cavalry, my Great-Great Grandfather Allan Dean McWhorter, who went blind in a Northern prison camp. The 29th Georgia Infantry, my Great-Great-Great Uncle Stephen W.N. Hagin, The 56th Georgia, my Great-Great Grandfather  Lt.William A. Allen, who lost an eye at Vicksburg and the 63rd Georgia Infantry, and my Great-Great Grandfather Martin C. Mewburn, who was wounded at Kennesaw Mountain. There are others from Florida, Alabama, and many more from Georgia. 

This morning, I saw some recent columns penned about how bad these holiday are, and how we should just forget about our past, and our heritage. Mainly these pleas for erasing history come from some, historically challenged, and emotionally fragile sort who is deathly afraid of offending someone. Funny these folks are not worried about offending me, or many other Southerners. They do not concern themselves with offending those that do living history presentations, or those that value history being preserved. these folks tend to be Liberal, but sadly, some “Conservatives” go down the path of hyper-sensitivity as well. They seem mostly concerned with not appearing too extreme. they are willing to sacrifice the Confederate portion of American history. Guess it never dawned on these geniuses that by bowing to those attacking Confederate heritage, history, and symbols that they are helping the radical Left to attack our Founders, and our American heritage.

Sure, we can condemn Lee, Davis, the Confederate Flags, there are hundreds of different flags that were carried  by different regiments, and songs like Dixie in the name of “sensitivity”. But, any “sin” you can  accuse those symbols of also apply to Old Glory, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and The Star Spangled Banner. Don’t think so? Listen to the constant attacks on America by the Left. Slavery, White Supremacy, injustice, exclusion, and so on. Of course, history, such as it is taught, has indoctrinated millions to embrace Lincoln as a great Emancipator, and the South as nothing but a bunch of white Supremacists fighting for slavery. You have to ignore the many things Lincoln said about Blacks as being inherently inferior to Whites, and his wish to expel all Blacks from the country after their freedom was won, many Abolitionists also shared that vision on an all-White nation too, but don’t let history get in your way. Forget that much of the opposition to expanding slavery was based not on setting men free but on NOT allowing a new challenge in the labor pool.

You can forget that the States of Tennessee, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Virginia only seceded after Lincoln asked them to supply troops to help subjugate the Confederacy. You can forget that the ordinances of secession from these state do not mention slavery. You can forget that many Americans saw secession as a right, and that most states, upon ratifying the Constitution, declared that they remained sovereign states. You can forget that the “other” issue the issue of tariffs that deeply divided the nation. You can forget that because reducing the war to the “good” North vs the “evil” South is far easier than examining the issues and causes. Intellectual laziness is way easier! And, just to be clear, I know many people have studied this war in a very thorough way, and some of them conclude that slavery was the main cause. While I disagree with them, I respect their integrity and their devotion to history.

You can forget that many Southern generals favored enlisting Blacks in the Southern armies in exchange for granting them freedom. You can overlook that such a desire to win the war clearly showed far more than slavery was driving these men. You can forget that Stonewall Jackson ran a Sunday School in Lexington Virginia that educated blacks. You can forget that after the war Robert E. Lee, who called slavery an abomination, was attending church at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church when a Black man rose to take communion Edward C Smith tells the story

One Sunday at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, a well-dressed, lone black man, whom no one in the community—white or black—had ever seen before, had attended the service, sitting unnoticed in the last pew.

Just before communion was to be distributed, he rose and proudly walked down the center aisle through the middle of the church where all could see him and approached the communion rail, where he knelt. The priest and the congregation were completely aghast and in total shock.

No one knew what to do…except General Lee. He went to the communion rail and knelt beside the black man and they received communion together—and then a steady flow of other church members followed the example he had set.

After the service was over, the black man was never to be seen in Richmond again. It was as if he had been sent down from a higher place purposefully for that particular occasion.

Today, and deservingly so, Lee is honored throughout the country. Only Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln exceed him in monuments and memorials.

Unfortunately there are many Southerners who claim to cherish Lee and revere the flag for which he so nobly fought but still harbor rabidly racist sentiments towards blacks and their long-delayed social progress. Such people do not honor Lee, instead they disgrace him.

Lee absolutely never felt what these modern Southerners continue to feel—and certainly he would not want them, of all people, serving as the self-annointed guardians of his memory. His lasting legacy, in his own words, is, “Before and during the War Between the States I was a Virginian. After the war I became an American.”

To be an American, at least for Lee, meant to embrace the new social order that the war had established and that the Constitution had codified through the addition of three new amendments which abolished slavery (13th) in 1865, made blacks citizens (14th) in 1868, and awarded black males the right to vote (15th) in 1870.

While you are at it, you can forget that Jefferson Davis, saw it as the duty of Whites to educate Blacks so they could one day compete with and be part of the nation. Yes you often hear that education of slaves was illegal in the South. What you do not hear is how many southerners ignored those laws. Yes, often it was for  religious reasons, they cared about the eternal souls of slaves. And yes, it is an odd thing for us to fathom such a time. Slavery was evil, but, the South neither started that evil, nor did many Southerners embrace it. And yes, some slave owners were Black themselves.

You can also forget that Lincoln, in 1848 said this

Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up, and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable – a most sacred right – a right, which we hope and believe, is to liberate the world. 
Abraham Lincoln

Perhaps Lincoln forgot that in 1861?

Yes, you can over simplify the debate America had over slavery by forgetting that some of the disagreements were based on the fact that at the time slavery was constitutional. For example, you can forget that many Southern leaders are accused of being “for the expansion of slavery” into the territories. They were in favor, but that is not the entire story. The fact is that Jefferson Davis saw slavery as constitutional, and as territories were federal property, and not yet states, he felt that banning slavery there violated the constitution. He also held deeply that once those territories became states, it was perfectly within their right to either allow of prohibit slavery. Once you look at the entire story, you get a different view of Davis, and the many Southerners who agreed with him. And no, I am not going into the typical scripted “I am not defending slavery” spiel here. If you are too stupid to get what I am saying then to Hell with you frankly. The point is that Davis was a man who held the Constitution sacred. He believed as most Southerners did, that there was but one way to change the Constitution, and that was to amend it! While I am at it, let me remind you that there were many “Republicans” at the time that believed in what they called higher law. To them higher law superseded the Constitution, I suppose it was their version of the Constitution being a “living, breathing” document.

As a Southerner, and a proud one, I am appalled that at one time slavery existed here. I am also of Jim Crow Laws, The same can be said of my pride in being American. Slavery was an awful stain on a great nation, but to be fair to men like Davis, and Lincoln, we ought to judge them based on the values of THEIR time, not ours. History is many things, and sometimes it is very ugly, and the portion of American history that deals with slavery is extremely ugly. hat does not mean that we ought to ignore it, nor should we pretend as many on the Left do, that it still exists.

You can forget whatever you like I suppose. But, once you start forgetting history because it is easy, or convenient, you have started down a path of ignorance that will only lead you to repeat much of the same history you have tried to bury.

What type of low life desecrates a war memorial?

 

Stories like this hit close to home for me

The Confederate Memorial Park near Point Lookout was vandalized last week with a spray-painted swastika on the base of a statue of a Confederate prisoner of war. A noose was placed around the statue’s neck and there was also a racial epithet spray-painted on another section of the memorial.

“I’m highly upset about it,” said Michael Daras, who lives nearby. His son, John, noticed the swastika on Thursday, but did not notice the noose until Friday when he visited the site.

“It shouldn’t be desecrated that way,” Michael Daras said, who was born in England and raised in Washington, D.C.

The memorial park was dedicated on Sept. 6, 2008, and cost more than $250,000 along with $100,000 worth of materials, said Jim Dunbar, chairman of the Confederate Memorial Park.

Awful, absolutely awful. Like I said this hits close to home, I had an ancestor, a Great-Great-Grandfather Allan Dean McWhorter, of the 4th South Carolina Cavalry was held at Point Lookout, and went blind while there. Oddly enough, another Great-Great-Grandfather  Lt.William A. Allen, of the 56th Georgia lost an eye at Vicksburg. The problem, however, is that such desecrations are all too common, as Richard G. Williams points out

 

In recent years, we’ve seen an increase in the number of articles and blog posts comparing Confederate soldiers to Nazis. It is an intellectually dishonest comparison with ideological and political motivations. Those promoting such an interpretation should be pleased with this bit of news. Evidently they’re having some success in getting their message out:
The Confederate Memorial Park near Point Lookout was vandalized last week with a spray-painted swastika on the base of a statue of a Confederate prisoner of war. A noose was placed around the statue’s neck and there was also a racial epithet spray-painted on another section of the memorial. (Story here.)

Beyond the obvious desecration of this memorial, I have a personal connection as my great-great Grandfather, Morris (aka “Maurice”) Coffey, was a prisoner at Point Lookout. This is disgusting. Fortunately, many are on to this twisting of history for the sole purpose of dishonoring Confederate soldiers:

Even the venerable Robert E. Lee has taken some vicious hits, as dishonest or misinformed advocates among political interest groups and in academia attempt to twist yesterday’s America into a fantasy that might better serve the political issues of today. The greatest disservice on this count has been the attempt by these revisionist politicians and academics to defame the entire Confederate Army in a move that can only be termed the Nazification of the Confederacy. Often cloaked in the argument over the public display of the Confederate battle flag, the syllogism goes something like this: Slavery is evil. The soldiers of the Confederacy fought for a system that wished to preserve it. Therefore they were evil as well, and any attempt to honor their service is a veiled effort to glorify the cause of slavery. ~ From Born Fighting by Virginia Senator James Webb (Page 208, emphasis mine).


Thus, any attempt to “glorify slavery” should be fought and one would be justified in desecrating monuments honoring Confederate soldiers. So, yes, academia is partly responsible as their Nazi comparisons and constant Confederate bashing encourages this type of thing. 

So sad, so very sad

 

Happy birthday to two of my heroes

Two great men, two great military leaders, and two men who formed a legendary military partnership

Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson

 

Lee was one of the great generals of history, winning greatvictories against long odds, he led the Army of Northern Virginia to victory after victory against the Army of the Potomac, which outnumbered Lee’s, sometimes nearly three to one. The Army of Potomac veterans gave a great compliment to their nemesis, desribing them as “terrible in battle”.

As US Grant set out to combat Lee in April of 1864, he became frustrated by all the talk amongst his officers about how great Lee was. One day he snapped that he was tired of hearing about what Bobby Lee is going to do to his army. He then mocked his officers saying that they talked as if Lee was going to turn both their flanks, and land in their rear at the same time. Days later, at the Battle of the Wilderness, in their first meeting, Lee turned both of Grant’s flanks, and nearly broke the center of Grant’s army as well.

Jackson was Lee’s “right arm” Taking Lee’s strategies and delivering crushing blows, rapid marches, and helping the Army of Northern Virginia to great victories.

This last picture shows Lee and Jackson at their last meeting, before Jackson’s flank attack on Joseph Hooker’s army on May 2, 1863. Lee and Jackson gained their brightest, and last victory on the Battle of Chancellorsville, as Lee, with 51,000 men, routed Hooker’s Army of the Potomac, numbering 134,000 men. Jackson would be wounded the night of the 2nd, losing his left arm, but dying of pneumonia May 10th.

MLK Day, an opposing view

Frankly, I have no issue with the holiday, but maybe I should? Bob Belvedere raises some interesting points

Frederick Douglass

Image via Wikipedia


 

-I was not a supporter of making Martin Luther King Jr’s birthday a national holiday.  I am still not.  If his career had ended the day after his I Have A Dream Speech [August 1963], I probably would have had no problem with having him being the one black honored with a holiday, but Rev. King went on to embrace Socialism and that disqualifies him from being so honored with an American Holiday.  Socialism is the exact opposite of everything America stands for and to esteem any person holding such views is a betrayal of The Founding.

Much better to have paid homage to Frederick Douglass, another brave man like Rev. King, but who embraced solidly American values and never wavered in his belief in the goodness of The United States Of America.  My favorite quote of his:

A man’s rights rest in three boxes. The ballot box, jury box and the cartridge box.

That statement could have come from The Duke or one of The Founding Fathers or from any Patriot.

Some more from Mr. Douglass:

…The American people have always been anxious to know what they shall do with us… I have had but one answer from the beginning. Do nothing with us! Your doing with us has already played the mischief with us. Do nothing with us! If the apples will not remain on the tree of their own strength, if they are worm-eaten at the core, if they are early ripe and disposed to fall, let them fall! … And if the negro cannot stand on his own legs, let him fall also. All I ask is, give him a chance to stand on his own legs! Let him alone! … your interference is doing him positive injury.

And…

No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck.

Read it all, very interesting and very thought provoking. Bob understands that for writing this that he will be called, well, you know

but, hey, what do I know: I’m a raaaaacist.

Yes, Bob, you will be thus labeled by the political correctors, but, wear it as a badge of honor sir! I too will be labeled for celebrating Confederate Heroes Day here in Texas on January 19th, which is Robert E Lee’s birthday. Stonewall Jackson was born Jan. 24th

I had dozens of ancestors who fought the Yankees, and I cherish their sacrifices and their memories. Those who say that these men fought to defend slavery are wrong. They deserve their holiday, and our remembrances! Anyone who wants to criticize me, or call me names for honoring my heritage can kiss my ass frankly.

Here are two videos from Gods and Generals, a fantastic, and historically sound movie about The Army of Norther Virginia, and about Stonewall Jackson, played by Stephen Lange

Old Virginia Blog: Diversity In The Confederacy

History that many want to hide. Lots more here

Honoring two great men

Those men, who became a great military team, were Stinewall Jackson, and Robert E. Lee. Very good article on them by Chuck Baldwin

Without question, Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson were two of the greatest military leaders of all time. Even more, many military historians regard the Lee and Jackson tandem as perhaps the greatest battlefield duo in the history of warfare. If Jackson had survived the battle of Chancellorsville, it is very possible that the South would have prevailed at Gettysburg and perhaps would even have won the War Between the States.

In fact, it was Lord Roberts, commander-in-chief of the British armies in the early twentieth century, who said, “In my opinion, Stonewall Jackson was one of the greatest natural military geniuses the world ever saw. I will go even further than that–as a campaigner in the field, he never had a superior. In some respects, I doubt whether he ever had an equal.”

While the strategies and circumstances of the War of Northern Aggression can (and will) be debated by professionals and laymen alike, one fact is undeniable: Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. Jackson were two of the finest Christian gentlemen this country has ever produced. Both their character and their conduct were beyond reproach.

Unlike his northern counterpart, Ulysses S. Grant, General Lee never sanctioned or condoned slavery. Upon inheriting slaves from his deceased father-in-law, Lee freed them. And according to historians, Jackson enjoyed a familial relationship with those few slaves that were in his home. In addition, unlike Abraham Lincoln and U.S. Grant, there is no record of either Lee or Jackson ever speaking disparagingly of the black race.

As those who are familiar with history know, General Grant and his wife held personal slaves before and during the War Between the States, and, contrary to popular opinion, even Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation did not free the slaves of the North. They were not freed until the Thirteenth Amendment was passed after the conclusion of the war. Grant’s excuse for not freeing his slaves was that “good help is so hard to come by these days.”

Furthermore, it is well established that Jackson regularly conducted a Sunday School class for black children. This was a ministry he took very seriously. As a result, he was dearly loved and appreciated by the children and their parents.

In addition, both Jackson and Lee emphatically supported the abolition of slavery. In fact, Lee called slavery “a moral and political evil.” He also said “the best men in the South” opposed it and welcomed its demise. Jackson said he wished to see “the shackles struck from every slave.”

Very good piece, read it all.

I have not witnessed a beating of this magnitude since….

Since my old dog Bo, a mix of English bulldog and Pit bull, think of the Mack Truck logo, and that would be Bo, locked his jaws onto another dog’s, er, well, let’s just say that Bo likely prevented that other dog from ever pro-creating. Anyway, since that beating that Bo, who was killed, sadly chasing a fire truck, he HATED sirens, delivered, I have not seen anyone receive such a thrashing. Until today that is.

Today, little Andy Sullivan, decided it would be a good idea to get on the wrong side R.S. McCain. I think Andy ought to remember the sage advice of the late singer Jim Croce who sang “You don’t pull the mask on the old Lone Ranger, and you don’t mes around with Jim”. Well, in your case Andy, R.S. McCain IS Jim.

By the way, lest anyone misunderstand about the late, great Bo, he was a swet dog, UNTIL another male dog came in his yard and messed with Bo’s people. In this case the dog in question, we will call him Andy Sullivan, acted in an unfriendly manner towards my little sister, BAD IDEA! Bo, was the ultimate Alpha-Male, a gentleman, unless you provoked him, then it was on!

Also, since I am comparing McCain’s thumping of Sullivan to other routs, I suggest you Google “Chancellorsvile”. There, Union general “Fightin” Joe Hooker, decided it would be a good idea to announce his intentions to destroy Lee’s Army of Nothern Virginia. It went very well for Hooker, until the fighting started. Instead of “ingloriously fleeing” as Hooker predicted, Lee attacked, and preceeded to deliver a beating of historical proportions.

Sullivan, though, should not feel too bad as he picks his teeth off the floor. R.S. McCain has smacked lots of Liberal hacks around, like Robert E. Lee out-generaled  lots of  Union commanders. McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker, Grant, yes, he thouroughly out-generaled Grant, but lost what Lincoln called “the arithmetic”.

So, Andy, just learn from your beating, and stop picking fights with your betters.