Tea Party Challenger Dave Brat Beats RINO House Majority Leader Eric Cantor In Virginia GOP Primary

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor Loses GOP Primary To Tea-Party Challenger – Dallas Morning News

.

.
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor was defeated Tuesday by a little-known economics professor in Virginia’s Republican primary, a stunning upset and major victory for the tea party.

Cantor is the second-most powerful member of the U.S. House and was seen by some as a possible successor to the House speaker.

His loss to Dave Brat, a political novice with little money marks a huge victory for the tea party movement, which supported Cantor just a few years ago.

Brat had been a thorn in Cantor’s side on the campaign, casting the congressman as a Washington insider who isn’t conservative enough. Last month, a feisty crowd of Brat supporters booed Cantor in front of his family at a local party convention.

His message apparently scored well with voters in the 7th District.

“There needs to be a change,” said Joe Mullins, who voted in Chesterfield County Tuesday. The engineering company employee said he has friends who tried to arrange town hall meetings with Cantor, who declined their invitations.

Tiffs between the GOP’s establishment and tea party factions have flared in Virginia since tea party favorite Ken Cuccinelli lost last year’s gubernatorial race. Cantor supporters have met with stiff resistance in trying to wrest control of the state party away from tea party enthusiasts, including in the Cantor’s home district.

Brat teaches at Randolph-Macon College, a small liberal arts school north of Richmond. He raised just more than $200,000 for his campaign, according to the most recent campaign finance reports.

Beltway-based groups also spent heavily in the race. The American Chemistry Council, whose members include many blue chip companies, spent more than $300,000 on TV ads promoting Cantor. It’s the group’s only independent expenditure so far this election year. Political arms of the American College of Radiology, the National Rifle Association and the National Association of Realtors had five-figure independent spending to promote Cantor.

Brat offset the cash disadvantage with endorsements from conservative activists like radio host Laura Ingraham, and with help from local tea party activists angry at Cantor.

Much of the campaign centered on immigration, where critics on both sides have recently taken aim at Cantor.

Brat has accused the House majority leader of being a top cheerleader for “amnesty” for immigrants in the U.S. illegally. Cantor has responded forcefully by boasting in mailers of blocking Senate plans “to give illegal aliens amnesty.”

It was a change in tone for Cantor, who has repeatedly voiced support for giving citizenship to certain immigrants brought illegally to the country as children. Cantor and House GOP leaders have advocated a step-by-step approach rather than the comprehensive bill backed by the Senate. They’ve made no move to bring legislation to a vote and appear increasingly unlikely to act this year.

Cantor, a former state legislator, was elected to Congress in 2000. He became majority leader in 2011.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

.

Why are ignorant buffoons allowed to write columns for the Washington Post?

I ask this question only because I happened upon a historically inaccurate piece, written by John Kelly, who is, by trade, a columnist for the Washington Post. His latest piece expresses shock, shock I say, that Generals Jackson and Lee are honored as Christian soldiers at the National Cathedral

On Wednesday, mourners will gather at Washington National Cathedral to celebrate the legacy of Nelson Mandela, a man who fought for racial equality. I’m guessing most of them will have no idea they’re sitting in a place that has shrines to two people who fought against it.

I certainly know I was surprised when I learned recently that two memorial niches — complete with stained-glass windows and laudatory inscriptions — honor Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson.

Well, I am unsure where the notion that Jackson and Lee were “against” racial equality. At least any more than Saint Lincoln did. His thoughts on the inferiority of the Black race are well documented. Not that Lincoln was alone in those thoughts in the mid 19th Century. But more to the point about Jackson and Lee and their views on race. Jackson ran a school in Lexington, Virginia educating Blacks, Historian Richard William’s book on this school is a must read for those who, like Kelly, are historically clueless. Here is a link to a stories about Jackson and Lee that Kelly should also read especially this part

One Sunday in June of 1865, just after the war ended, St. Paul’s Episcopal, was packed with folks leaning on each other and God for understanding about what their future held. But they could never have imagined what would happen during the service.

When the pastor began to serve communion, a well-dressed black man came forward first.

It would be an understatement to say that the event caused a few awkward moments among the white congregants. They remained seated, except one man who went forward and knelt near him.

That man was General Robert E. Lee

The general’s actions come as no surprise to noted Civil War historian James Robertson, who says Lee was a man of duty and faith.

“His duty was to his native state, both in war and in peace,” Robertson, a history professor at Virginia Tech, said. “His faith was very deep-seated. And I think Lee was simply exhibiting both. He knew that the South had been crushed, defeated, humiliated. He knew he had a duty to himself, to his God to help reconstruct his beloved Virginia as much as he could.”

The rest of the congregation followed Lee’s example and took communion as well.

Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend?

But it’s a stained glass window that represents one of the greatest ironies of the Civil War. The window honors another prominent Confederate general: Stonewall Jackson.

The window is not in a museum. It’s proudly displayed in the predominantly black Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke, Va.

The church’s founding pastor Rev. Lylburn Downing designed the window in 1906 to honor Jackson for leading his parents to faith in Christ when they were slave children.

Prior to the Civil War, Jackson was a professor at the Virginia Military Institute, and a deacon at the Lexington Presbyterian Church.

In 1855, the man who would become one of the Civil War’s most famous generals, began a Sunday school class for black children, slave and free.

Downing’s father and mother were among his many students.

“As he saw it, slavery was something that God ordained upon black people in America for God’s own reasons,” Robertson said. “And he had no right to challenge God’s will. That was blasphemy. And so, while he hated slavery, he was opposed to slavery, Jackson had to obey his Heavenly Father and accept the system. And he accepted it through doing the Golden Rule, do unto others as he would wish they do unto him.”

Professor Miller believes Jackson’s justification of slavery on biblical grounds was wrong.

“Yet in the midst of all of that, I think that people can do good stuff, maybe for all the wrong reasons, but motivated by sincere hearts,” he said.

That sincerity is confirmed by the fact that Jackson was willing to break Virginia law by teaching the class. Even after the war began, Jackson sent money back to the church to keep the class going.

Richard Williams has documented Jackson’s ministry in a book called, Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend.

He says the Sunday school class had a generational impact.

” a number of scholars, as Jackson referred to his students, that went on to become ministers,” Williams said. “There were four churches established, three in Lexington and then this one. Two of those churches in Lexington are still vibrant ministries today.”

And when a statue at Jackson’s gravesite in Lexington was erected in 1891, it was one of Jackson’s scholars-turned-pastor who made the first contribution.

How do the members of Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church feel about a stained glass window honoring a Confederate general?

Freeland Pendleton, who’s been a member of the church most of his life, says he has no problem with it.

“The reason I was okay with it because he had the courage to teach us, teach blacks to read and write,” Pendleton said. “Whether he was fighting for slavery, or whatever, he did do a good thing.”

You can go read the rest of Kelly’s column, it is sad, very sad, that someone would choose to write a column on subject’s he knows little about.

Just remember that Liberals say they HATE big money in politics

Yes, they hate them some big political money, sure

Tom Steyer is Virginia’s $8 million man.

The California billionaire spent nearly that much from his personal fortune to make an example of Republican Ken Cuccinelli for his arch-conservative views on the environment. The sum is more than three times the investment that’s been previously reported, and it nearly matched what the Republican Governors Association, the largest GOP outside spender, put into the Virginia governor’s race. It is more money, on a per-vote basis, than the famously prolific conservative donors Sheldon and Miriam Adelson spent in the 2012 presidential election.

Remember the Democratic Party is the party of the “working man” and the GOP is the party of the rich man. Just another Leftist lie that suckers fall for. Stacy McCain lays the blame on the Environmental Industrial Complex

 

Yes, Virginia, The GOP Establishment Did Stick A Shiv In Ken Cuccinelli (Matthew Vadum)

Yes, Virginia, The GOP Establishment Did Stick A Shiv In Ken Cuccinelli – Matthew Vadum

Reagan conservative Ken Cuccinelli lost his bid for the Virginia governorship because the patrician, turf-protecting Republican Party establishment in his state wanted him to lose.

It’s really that simple.

.

Cuccinelli campaign strategist Chris La Civita suggested on election night Tuesday that the federal government’s partial shutdown last month may have hurt his candidate in parts of Virginia where many federal employees and contractors live.

He also suggested that Cuccinelli could have won if he had received more money from national GOP sources, which he said dried up as of Oct. 1.

“There are a lot of questions people are going to be asking and that is, was leaving Cuccinelli alone in the first week of October, a smart move?” La Civita said. “We were on our own. Just look at the volume [of ads].”

Cuccinelli lost by a mere 2.5 percentage points in a state that until somewhat recently had been solidly Republican. Even with Cuccinelli’s various tactical mistakes (and there were many), it is still very difficult to believe that the GOP machine couldn’t have gotten another fifty-odd thousand voters to the polls to support him if it really wanted to.

Predictably, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who won re-election comfortably on Tuesday, refused to lift a finger to help his vulnerable fellow Republican in Virginia. Even with mountains of cash, Christie had no electoral coattails, which is not exactly a resume-builder for a presidential candidate.

This is, of course, the same politician who betrayed GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney on at least two occasions. Christie spent his high-profile speech at the Republican National Convention last year talking about himself instead of Romney. He also won President Obama lots of votes by cozying up to him during the Tropical Storm Sandy saga. But his personal popularity didn’t do a thing for the rest of the New Jersey GOP slate this week.

What happened to Cuccinelli wasn’t some back-room conspiracy shrouded in smoke and euphemisms; it was a conscious, overt effort to do serious damage to a Tea Party standard-bearer.

Virginia Republicans tend to value hierarchy and tradition. Cuccinelli the upstart was punished for his impertinence. Instead of waiting his turn, as the aristocratic gatekeepers of the Virginia GOP demand, Cuccinelli asked his party elders to value merit and good policy proposals over seniority and rank. The powers that be within the Virginia Republican establishment responded by smearing the archetypal conservative as an extremist and trying to squash him.

Remember that the establishment came out hard four years ago for the now-tainted RINOish governor Bob McDonnell, but this year largely left the cash-strapped Cuccinelli to his own devices against the fabulously wealthy Terry McAuliffe, the Democrats’ Daddy Warbucks.

According to the Virginia Public Access Project, key GOP fundraising organs lavished funds in the 2009 election cycle on the ethically slippery McDonnell. The Republican Party of Virginia and the Republican National Committee gave McDonnell $2,704,348 and $2,253,500, respectively.

In the 2013 election cycle, the two big political committees were stingy, according to available data. As of Oct. 23, the Republican Party of Virginia had given Cuccinelli $843,085, and the RNC had coughed up a paltry $85,098 for the gubernatorial candidate. (The Republican Governors’ Association was not stingy. RGA gave $1,994,312 to McDonnell, who leaves office in disgrace in January, and a healthy $8,066,772 to Cuccinelli.)

But the Republican National Committee is putting the word out that it did everything it could to help Cuccinelli.

The RNC claims that it spent $3 million on the so-called ground game to help Cuccinelli and the rest of the Republican ticket “while building the party’s presence in Virginia.” The non-Cuccinelli-specific effort included testing a “new precinct-based voter contact model.” The RNC gushed that its “Virginia-based staff included four dedicated to Asian-Pacific American engagement, two for African American engagement, and one for Hispanic engagement.”

Radio talk show host Mark Levin says the RNC is trying to “punk” conservatives by trying to “to persuade you that the RNC has been vigorously fighting for Cuccinelli’s campaign in Virginia. They think you’re so stupid that you’ll buy this self-serving BS.”

Even if we generously give the RNC the benefit of the doubt and assume it did everything it could to boost Cuccinelli’s chances, there is no question that there was heavy institutional resistance among GOP apparatchiks to the mainstream conservative contender’s bid.

Cuccinelli’s worst enemies were just as likely to be found among Republicans as Democrats. There was no shortage of prominent, important Republicans crossing the aisle to endorse Democrat McAuliffe.

Boyd Marcus, former chief of staff for House Majority Leader Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.), joined the McAuliffe campaign after the gubernatorial candidacy of his pick, sore loser Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling, flamed out. Bolling himself petulantly refused to endorse Cuccinelli and worked hard against him, demoralizing the grassroots and depressing turnout by badmouthing the nominee on conservative talk radio every chance he got.

Other Republicans who endorsed McAuliffe include Dwight Schar, former RNC finance chairman; Judy Ford Wason, a GOP strategist who worked for McDonnell; former state senate president pro tempore John Chichester; state senator Russ Potts; and former House of Delegates members Vince Callahan, Katherine Waddell, and Jim Dillard.

Karl Rove, the corporatist Wile E. Coyote of the political consulting world who nearly lost George W. Bush the presidency not once, but twice, did nothing to help Cuccinelli. That’s because the generally useless strategerist and other establishment figures have declared war on the Tea Party.

And virtually no one defended GOP lieutenant governor candidate E.W. Jackson when his Democratic opponent, Ralph Northam, viciously slimed him for his mainstream Christian beliefs. It is a core tenet of Christianity that original sin is responsible for a host of maladies in the world and, unsurprisingly, Jackson, head pastor of a Christian church in Chesapeake, believes in that doctrine.

But Northam ran a disgusting TV ad that amounted to an attack on the very precepts of Christianity itself. Building on Jackson’s otherwise unremarkable belief in original sin, Sarelle Holiday, mother of a disabled child, absurdly accused Jackson of considering her son “a punishment.” Northam, who is white, is such a class act that he even refused to shake the hand of Jackson, who is black, during a joint public appearance in Hampton Roads.

Even before the polls had closed Tuesday, GOP operatives were already armed with excuses to explain away Cuccinelli’s approaching loss. The D.C. echo chamber reverberated with accusations that Cuccinelli was a woman-hating religious kook and an irresponsible loudmouth.

One said a “fire-breathing conservative turned populist unable to defend his positions on birth control” and women’s issues was doomed to lose. The RNC, in his view, was right to save its money for “races they can actually win.” Of course, a race decided by a mere 2.5 percentage points is pretty well winnable by definition.

With Cuccinelli’s totally avoidable loss, Terry McAuliffe, whose lifelong profession is Clinton operative, will be in position to secure Virginia for his puppet-mistress, Alinskyite neo-Marxist Hillary Clinton, in the 2016 presidential election.

McAuliffe is now a safe bet to take over the Democratic Governors Association and the National Governors Association. Both perches will give him even more access to high-dollar donors than he has now.

Cuccinelli’s humiliation at the polls gives plenty of ammo to left-wingers. The media is already saying Tuesday’s election results show that voters have repudiated the Tea Party.

This is abject nonsense. Cuccinelli was able to almost close a huge gap in the polls with McAuliffe only by campaigning hard in the final days on the monstrosity that is ObamaCare and linking the hated wealth- and health-redistribution program to his opponent.

Also on Tuesday in Mobile, Alabama, a relative nobody, a Tea Party guy named Dean Young, with no money and no big fancy political machine behind him, scored an impressive 47 percent of the vote in a GOP primary runoff against Bradley Byrne, the well-funded choice of big business, who will almost certainly win the general election in the ultra-safe Republican congressional seat.

Of course, the fact that a Tea Party activist came out of nowhere to almost score an upset against a pillar of the Republican Party establishment is nowhere to be found in the New York Times article about the election.

The narrative is always more important than the truth.

Click HERE For Rest Of Story

.

Did the GOP NOT want to win in Virginia?

Rush has his take and I would agree that this is a race Cuccinelli SHOULD have won, had the GOP establishment done their damn jobs. But, the GOP apparently prefers to throw away elections in an effort to silence or discredit the Tea Party. Remember this the next time a RINO tells you that we must win elections” to get anywhere.

Sorry, but two thugs being killed while committing a violent felony IS justice!

I am so damn tired of the bastardization of the word “justice”!

The families of the two masked armed robbers killed in Reading, PA by a concealed carrier are now complaining that they want justice.

Family members of the two masked men shot to death after allegedly robbing a store in Reading spoke out Tuesday.

“It’s not fair,” said Virginia Medina, mother of 24-year-old William Medina, who police said robbed Krick’s Korner store alongside 18-year-old Robert De Carr on Monday.

The two men were shot and killed by a private citizen while leaving the store, and family members want to see charges pressed.

“[William] had no right to lose his life over something that man could have called the police for,” said Medina. “He took the law into his own hands and walked away scot-free.”

“How about if people just start running around here, policing the city on their own? How much worse is it going to get?” said Peter Ratel, Medina’s cousin.

The family members said they are hurt by comments suggesting the alleged robbers were “thugs.

Let us see. They were armed, used their weapons to threaten and rob a store owner, then, they pulled those same guns on a man trying to do the right thing  and he killed them in self-defense.

It was just after 2:00 p.m. Monday when shots rang out outside Krick’s Korner Market on the 1600 block of North 9th Street.

Adams says cameras were rolling as the men, donning masks and armed with guns, entered the store and terrorized employees, pointing their weapons and making demands.

A concerned citizen witnessed the robbery happening from outside the store and waited there for the suspects.

The armed men took cash, cigarettes and lottery tickets before exiting the store. Outside they were confronted by the concerned citizen who told them not to move and that he was calling police.

Adams said a struggle ensued and the suspects took out their weapons. The citizen, however, was also armed and fired at the suspects.

The suspects were both shot in the chest and died at the scene.

Police took the armed citizen in for questioning, but after reviewing video of the incident and speaking with a number of witnesses, authorities released the man.

Adams said the shooter was very cooperative. The man had a license to carry, and since he was threatened at gunpoint, no charges are expected to be filed.

Sounds like they were thugs to me. Sorry, that their families lost loved ones, but they have no moral right to desire punishment for a man who simply defended himself. That is not “justice” that is INjustice!

 

No, the Virginia election was not a rejection of the Tea Party, it was a failure of the establishment GOP

The media, and of course Democrats will point to the defeat of Ken Cuccinelli in the Virginia governors election and say that this is a huge, massive, epic, and crippling defeat for the Tea Party, and Conservatism. And when they say that, they will be either lying or engaging in a bit of propaganda. If any entity failed in that race, it was the GOP leadership, which allowed Democrats to outspend them 10-1, and a finger of blame might also point at Chris Christie. Christie, with his reelection assured was asked, repeatedly, to come campaign for Kuccinelli. He declined, how is that for team work? Thanks Governor, really

By the way, it seems that Kuccinelli won among the middle class voters in Virginia, while McAuliffe won among the poor, and wealthy. I guess the duel Democratic strategies of make the rich feel guilty, and promise the poor you will give them everything worked. Odd, because those who will be hardest hit by McAuliffe’s Left wing policies will be those poor that were so busy voting with their hands out that they could not understand that the promises of leftism NEVER materialize.