What the Left, and sadly, some Conservatives just do not grasp

Many people think they understand the South, but many simply do not. The Left loathes the South, and always will. Many Northeastern Republicans look down their noses at the South. Some folks just sadly believe the idiotic stereotypes. Me? Well I grew up here, and have lived my whole life here. And, in fact, generations of my family have been here spread across Dixie for hundreds of years. I grew up worshiping my grandfather, who was born in Georgia, and was a hard worker, generous, and every bit a Southerner. He had many friends, of all races, and he treated others with respect, and kindness. From him, my grandmother and my parents, I learned that people were people. I learned how to treat people from them. And, I learned, by their example, how skin color really was not important. That people should be seen and judged by their actions, not their skin. 

I heard my grandfather tell of the worst whipping he ever got. It was for sassing an elderly Black lady. I also saw the genuine pain and heartbreak in my grandfathers’ best buddy, Simon, who was Black, when he heard my grandfather had passed away, I saw that same sadness in other faces of various races at the news. 

Growing up as a Southerner I watched people come together, regardless of race, or religion, because that is what you did when people lost a family member, or had some tragedy in their life. You offered help, made them food, sat with them, whatever, just because.

I came across this piece by a United States veteran, a Southerner today, and a reminded of how special, it is to be Southern, and how wrong many are about us.

By Courtney Daniels, a Birmingham native, former U.S. Marine and veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom

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In 2001, the Taliban shamelessly dynamited the Bamiyan Buddhas, two of the largest such carvings of the ancient world. Built in the 6th century by monks who made their homes along the Silk Road, the Buddahs stood for millenia until fundamentalists removed them from the face of the Earth. Such ignorance still abounds. Over the past few months, the onslaught of the Islamic State has wrought the systematic destruction of cultural artifacts from Palmyra to Nineva, all because they were deemed “offensive” by a minority that if it had its way, would ensure the entire world would adhere to a dark and revisionist existence.

A couple of days ago, in the wake of a childish debate over a memorial flag flown near a Confederate statue, a Southern monument was ignorantly desecrated with an attempt at the “Black Lives Matter” slogan. The spray-painted phrase was misspelled. The inanimate statue, a solemn reminder of the South’s fallen sons, didn’t take away any citizen’s pursuit of happiness, it didn’t interfere with the social and racial disparities that some claim as a detriment to advancement — it simply stood there, silent and bold, marking the bravery and errors of yesterday’s determinations. 

From the gun debate to the flag debate (which are both somehow tied to this most recent, senseless shooting tragedy) it seems that liberal thought continues to show its fear of inanimate objects. Such a way of thinking never holds PEOPLE accountable.  Instead it points fingers in every other direction. 

The removal of a historical banner won’t stop racists from exercising bigotry. As a matter of fact, racists will be racists despite regulations and constant “feel good” legislation, no flag needed. The ignorance of the disgruntled protestors is evident in their refusal to acknowledge that the flag widely recognized as the “Confederate Flag” was never actually adopted as the flag of the Confederacy. They’ll also never admit or realize that not only was slavery not the motivating factor for the ensuing civil war, but that slavery was an American institution, not a Confederate one. 

The Confederacy, in its prime, never mounted the atrocities of the Trail of Tears or the Black Hills conspiracy. But it seems that all because a few cowards in bedsheets once hijacked the gorgeous colors of a banner so rich in history to terrorize and intimidate other Americans, we condemn the Southern cloth to oblivion as a misnamed symbol of hate. It doesn’t matter that slaves outside of the declared boundaries remained enslaved in the North. Neither does it matter that many Southerners gave up plots of their property to house and provide compensable labor for black workers. It doesn’t matter that Lincoln, who is often regarded as the liberator of enslaved blacks cared less for the welfare of slaves than for the sovereignty of an entire country. 

Where I come from, deep in the Heart of Dixie, I see that flag every single day with its bold red field and star-studded cross of St. Andrews in royal blue. I hold a certain respect for it that others fueled by emotion and misinformation wouldn’t understand. I revere it as a son of the South in a way that would confuse those on the outside looking in, who by the way are not entitled to commentary on which flag waves in our humid Southern breeze. I spot it on not so subtle scavenger hunts gracing a random shirt at the gas station, the hat of the guy behind the counter at my local bait and tackle shop, and the bed of a passing pickup with the accompanying decal “Southern Pride.” I smile because I know that if in need, that guy would give me that same shirt off his back. I smile because I live in a region that has a certain defiance that only a select few inherit.

As a black man who grew up in the South, I’ll admit I didn’t always see the issue with this same clarity. I blindly followed the sentimentalism of my parents and educators who passed judgement from a seat of victimization, failing to challenge evidence to the contrary. My opinion on the Battle Flag was swayed as a 13-year-old reading a contributor’s opinion in the Birmingham News, circa 2001. A white man with Confederate heritage, he acknowledged that he had never considered the flag flying on his front lawn to have held such a negative connotation in the minds of so many blacks. I remember from reading the column, he had a certain politeness that urged him to take his flag down and hang it indoors out of respect for those who didn’t like it. I respected his consideration and it prompted me to do my own homework on what role the Civil War and the flag in question played in my ancestor’s past and my own future. I realized then that I had foolishly labeled every white person sporting the flag as a racist, with no facts to back my claim and without placing myself in their shoes or knowing them personally. 

In short, I’ve come to terms with it being a wrongfully vilified piece of Southern culture, as important to our collective heritage as RC Cola and Moon Pies. 

In so many ways, the South is the conscience of the entire nation. In the 21st century with Americans abandoning all decency and forgetting to walk tall, the South still manages to maintain a certain air of moral obligation that has been all but lost in northern enclaves like Philadelphia where Americans scowl at one another, heavily divided by racial suspicion and bigotry, or cities like New York where neighborhoods a century after the Great Migration of blacks are still heavily defined by skin tone and distrust. In the South, we mingle. We play. We do like Willie Mays and “say hey” no matter the color of the person sitting on the porch. I walk into my local grocery with my daughter and like the tick of the clock, I know I can count on an endearing “Hey baby doll, you need some help?” from the attendant whose skin heavily contrasts mine. Her “y’all come on back now” is the most welcoming invitation I could ever hear. 

It’s clear that as a nation, we are embarking on a new, revised, politically correct avenue of apology. The future is a dim one, void of backbone and fistfights. No more, “each according to the dictates of his own conscience.”

“If it offends my neighbor, make it illegal, dynamite it, wipe it from the face of the Earth” rages the contentious fascist. It’s becoming clear that what those progressives want is a new, bleak, unrecognizable South, its accomplishments and errors equally stricken from the annals of history. They wish its monuments to be no more, the names of its generals removed from every institution, it’s antebellum flair retold as a horror story as if Sherman’s destruction wasn’t enough of a disgrace.

 I am from the great state of Alabama and live between the rivers of Tennessee. I am a proud American and maybe in ways, an even louder Southerner. Can’t help it. I relate because I’m a rebel in so many ways and I’m very proud of where I’m from. I can read an accent from either Carolina and know that I’m in good company. I can present my pistol permit to a Texas Ranger and trust that it will be honored four hundred miles in the other direction. I know that I can stop for small talk in any Waffle House in Georgia, and strike up a meaningful conversation with the Walmart shopper behind me in line in Mississippi. I don’t need to know those people, they already know me. I am related to them and they are related to me. 

If you don’t know us but have an opinion about how we should live our lives or if you can’t dissect the FACTS of a situation without making it a divisive issue, as Southerners, we only have one thing to say to your folly: “Bless your heart.”

So well said sir, so well said. If only some people would listen, they might just learn something!

Rush Limbaugh gets history wrong, Blogger corrects him

Bravo Stogie!

Rush Limbaugh really showed his ignorance of American history and the Civil War today.  He voiced some feel-good myths that are easily refuted, and should be.

Here are his statements and my correction:

1.  The Founding Fathers only allowed slavery at the formation of the United States to appease the Southern states and encourage them to join the union.  The Northern states opposed slavery and hated it and wanted to get rid of it.

Horse feathers.  MOST of the Founding Fathers were slave owners or slave traders, including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and Patrick Henry.

Twelve of the thirteen original colonies were slave states.  There was no significant opposition to slavery by the Northern states.  In fact, the Northern states were enthusiastically getting rich through slave trading.  For every slave they sold to the South, they sold 20 more to Cuba, Brazil and the West Indies.  Massachusetts, that great bastion of abolitionism, enslaved the Pequot Indians and sold them into slavery outside the continent.  Rhode Island built and maintained an impressive fleet of ships designed and used specifically for slave trading.  Northern textile mills used Southern cotton, planted and harvested by slaves, without any moral objections whatsoever.

Slaves were used in the North just as long as they were needed, and were then sold to the South once immigrants (like the Irish) were plentiful enough to replace slavery.

2.  Fifty thousand soldiers died in the Civil War to abolish slavery.  Not even close, Rush.  Over 600,000 soldiers died in the Civil War (estimates put the number at around 640,000).  At least 300,000 were Union soldiers. They did not fight to free the slaves, they fought to force the South back into a political union that they no longer wanted, for the usual reasons:  to maintain the ability to tax and control property.  For more details, see the scholarly essay by a university professor who actually knows what he is talking about:  Why the Civil War Was Not About Slavery, by Donald Livingston, Emory University.  The “fighting to free the slaves” myth was created after the war to give a false veneer of righteousness to Northern aggression.

So Rush, as someone who listens to you regularly, I must advise you to SHUT UP with regard to the Civil War and the Southern states, since you are wrong on the facts, and since you are alienating many Americans who are Confederate descendants, many of whom are conservatives.

It is possibly the best testament to how twisted our education indoctrination system is that brilliant patriots like Rush still misunderstand why the War Between the States happened.

If this offends you, I have a suggestion, read your history

Everyone who knows this blog knows there are some things some things I will never stop defending. America, and our founding principles, the right to self-defense, Individualism, the right to life, and my Confederate ancestors who fought only when forced to in self-defense by an over reaching Lincoln administration that cared more about centralizing power in the federal union than our Constitution. I understand that some of my most admired Conservatives today would disagree with me, that is fine. I have nothing but respect for them, but, I, after studying the War of Northern Aggression for many years, I can come to no other conclusion than to say the blow struck against state sovereignty was one of the worst ever dealt our republic. And one we are still suffering from today.

The Left has always used every opportunity to hijack causes to destroy the right of self-governance, and The Lincoln administration was no different. As one historian put it there was an overriding difference between Confederate president Jefferson Davis, and President Lincoln. Davis was willing to destroy the union to save the Constitution, Lincoln was willing to destroy the Constitution to save the union. Now, I understand people will ask what would the Constitution be without the union?. I would counter by asking what our union is without our Constitution? I would ask y’all to ponder that question, to imagine it. But, look around, we already know what a post-Constitutional America looks like. Think about that. Really think about it. Then think about this. Many members of Team Lincoln believed in Higher Law, that is they believed that the Constitution was NOT the ultimate law of the land. Again, think about that!

So, I post this to hopefully make you think, and study our history. And, with nothing but love, respect and the deepest admiration for every true Conservative who I fight alongside every day to make this nation what our Founders intended, I post the following images. Three are of my Great-Great Grandfathers who fought for the Confederacy. Lt. William A. Allen, Co. G 56th Georgia Infantry, who lost an eye at Vicksburg and came back to fight some more, and Pvt. Martin C. Mewborn, Co. I 63rd Georgia Infantry, wounded fighting Sherman at Kennesaw Mountain. The third is Pvt. Allen Dean McWhorter of the 4th South Carolina Cavalry who went blind in a Union prison camp at Point Lookout. The fourth image is my way of honoring the Confederate soldiers who fought in the War Between the States.

AD McWhorter MC Mewborn r89 WA Allen

And the Left’s War on Southerners rolls on

Here they go again, trying to take down a memorial to Confederate soldiers

The Charleston County Council is waiting to hear from the South Carolina Attorney General’s Office before deciding whether to withhold funding from the Citadel. 

The decision is based on a Confederate flag hanging in the school chapel.

Councilman Henry Darby says concerned constituents urged him to do something when they noticed the flag. He originally threatened to withhold $1 million dollars in funding.

The Citadel says the state’s Heritage Act protects the flag.

“I would tend to think they would find that given previous decisions, this would come under this Heritage Protection Act and it would be protected,” said former State Attorney General Charlie Condon.

The Citadel says the flag is a memorial for Citadel cadets who died in the Civil War.

I really cannot think of a more cowardly or despicable act than to attack a memorial to fallen soldiers, in this case cadets from the Citadel that serve in the War Between the States. We Southerners who are proud of our ancestors do not ask much, except to stop getting kicked in the teeth, and to have history honored and preserved.

40 Confederate soldiers to receive proper burial

May they rest in peace, finally

Their remains sat, unmarked, in shallow graves at the Old City Cemetery in Lynchburg, Va., for decades. Now, two centuries after the Civil War, the bodies of 40 Confederate soldiers discovered over the past two months will receive a proper memorial. 

“It’s been very meaningful to us to find these spots, identify these soldiers and bring closure to families,” said Ted Delaney, the cemetery’s assistant director, who, along with a team of archaeologists, uncovered the exact resting place of some 40 Confederate soldiers as well as the plots where Union soldiers were once buried and later exhumed.

Delaney told FoxNews.com that, beginning in April, the team dug a 45-by-10-foot trench within “Yankee Square” at the cemetery where they found a mix of red and orange squares, which they determined were Confederate soldiers’ graves. He said 35 to 40 graves were found during this latest search and that 50 were uncovered in the same area last year.

Delaney said he is now tasked with identifying each soldier’s grave and giving it the tribute it deserves. 

“Our goal is to put a marker at each grave space to identify the soldier and note when he died and his military unit,” said Delaney, who is optimistic about the project because, “the undertaker’s notes are so detailed and complete.” 

He said that when all is done, about 80 Confederate soldiers will be properly identified. He noted that the remains of Union soldiers were exhumed and removed from the plot of land in 1866.

“This has been an incredible process of discovery,” he said. “It’s always been very frustrating for those descendents who come to us because they can’t find their ancestor’s grave. Now we can bring some of them closure.” 

As a final tribute, here is a word that clearly defines why they fought

Here we go again, more Leftist bullies

Seven ill-educated and misguided students at Washington 7 Lee University are offended by Robert E. Lee and are demanding “Tolerance” or something

Some Washington & Lee University law students want the university to live by its honor code and stop glorifying its namesake by acknowledging the dishonorable side of both Robert E. Lee and W&L.

Seven multiracial students, calling themselves The Committee, have demanded that W&L remove the flags of the Confederacy from the campus and Lee Chapel, acknowledge and apologize for participating in chattel slavery, recognize Martin Luther King Day on the undergraduate campus and ban neo-Confederates from marching across campus to the chapel on Lee-Jackson Day.

If their demands are not met by Sept. 1, they will engage in civil disobedience.

University President Kenneth Ruscio on Wednesday issued a letter to the W&L community that said “we take these students’ concerns seriously. The issues they have raised are important, and we intend to address them.”

Ruscio said W&L invites a prominent speaker during MLK Legacy Week; the undergraduate faculty decides whether classes are held on MLK day; the eight battle flags in Lee Chapel, representing armies of the Confederate States of America, are educational and historical, and the university does not observe Lee-Jackson Day.

His message did not indicate whether W&L would meet any of the students’ demands, but that he invited them to meet with the University Committee on Inclusiveness and Campus Climate that has been holding focus groups on these same issues.

The students said that they emailed the committee four days ago and had yet to hear a response.

The university should tell these seven cry babies to learn something about Lee. If they did they would likely be ashamed of themselves. He was an honorable man, who fought for his home, and who considered slavery an abomination, and did his best to heal the country after the war. He was also a proponent of freeing the slaves during the war, and a man who deserves to have his memory taught in total, and not through the prism of Leftist fantasy.