Another Win For Walker – Wisconsin Voter ID Law Stands As USSC Rejects Appeal

Wisconsin Voter-ID Law Stands As Supreme Court Rejects Appeal – Bloomberg

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The U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for Wisconsin to implement a voter-identification law that opponents say is one of the strictest in the nation.

Rejecting without comment an appeal by civil rights groups, the justices Monday gave a victory to Republicans, including Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, who have championed voter-ID laws around the country. Wisconsin is one of 30 states with ID laws and one of 17 that enacted measures since the Supreme Court upheld an Indiana statute in 2008.

Civil rights groups say ID requirements disproportionately affect minority and low-income voters while doing little if anything to protect against fraud. The organizations pressing the Wisconsin appeal said 300,000 registered voters in that state lack a qualifying ID.

“The right to vote is the foundational element of American democracy,” the groups argued. “Increasingly restrictive voter ID laws like Wisconsin’s Act 23 unjustifiably burden the voting rights of millions of registered voters, particularly African-Americans and Latinos.”

Wisconsin officials led by Walker, a potential presidential candidate, defended the law. They argued that it will impose a minimal burden on voters while providing more assurance of a fraud-free election.

‘Overwhelming Majority’

“In Wisconsin, as elsewhere, the overwhelming majority of voters already have qualifying ID,” Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel argued. “For those who lack ID, obtaining one and bringing it to the polling place is generally no more of a burden than the process of voting itself.”

In a statement Monday, Schimel said the voter-ID law won’t take effect for an April 7 election for judicial offices because absentee ballots already have been sent to voters.

“The voter-ID law will be in place for future elections,” he said.

In October the Supreme Court blocked the Wisconsin law from applying to the Nov. 4 election. A lower court had revived the law weeks earlier, and civil rights groups told the high court at the time that hasty implementation would mean widespread confusion.

Lower courts have largely backed voter-ID laws. In a notable exception, a federal trial judge said Texas’s statute was the product of intentional discrimination. That case is now before a federal appeals court and could make its way to the Supreme Court before the 2016 election.

2014 Election

Unlike with Wisconsin, the Supreme Court let the Texas law take effect for the 2014 election.

In the latest Wisconsin appeal, groups led by the League of United Latin American Citizens argued that the 2011 state law violated the U.S. constitutional guarantee of equal protection and the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Wisconsin’s law lets voters use any of eight forms of identification, including in-state driver’s licenses, state-issued photo IDs for non-drivers and military IDs. The state also accepts some student identification cards, though not those from the University of Wisconsin campuses.

A federal trial judge invalidated the measure, saying it would deter many residents from voting. The judge also said the state hadn’t pointed to any recent instances of voter impersonation in Wisconsin.

A three-judge federal appeals panel in Chicago reversed that decision, pointing to new rules the state issued to help people obtain the documentation they need to get IDs. Officials took that step after the Wisconsin Supreme Court, in a separate case, said people must be able to get IDs without having to pay a fee for documents.

‘Fig Leaf’

The panel’s ruling drew a rebuke from Judge Richard Posner, who argued unsuccessfully for reconsideration by a larger group of judges. Posner said voter-impersonation fraud was “a mere fig leaf for efforts to disenfranchise voters.”

The Supreme Court in 2008 upheld Indiana’s voter-ID law on a 6-3 vote. Writing the court’s lead opinion, Justice John Paul Stevens said voter fraud was a real risk that “could affect the outcome of a close election.”

Stevens said the record in the Indiana case “does not provide any concrete evidence of the burden imposed on voters who currently lack photo identification.”

The Wisconsin civil rights groups say the trial in their case produced that type of evidence. State officials say the two laws are indistinguishable after the changes required by the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

The case is Frank v. Walker, 14-803.

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*VIDEO* Ted Cruz Speech At Liberty University (03/23/15)


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*VIDEO* Mark Levin Slams Moonbat CNN Host For Insinuating That Bibi Netanyahu Is A Racist


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Romney Says Screw It

With Romney Out, Jeb Bush Gets A Boost – Big Government

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With 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s announcement that he will not pursue the 2016 presidential nomination, the conservative grassroots may be celebrating. They thought of Romney as a political squish, a flip-flopper, the creator of Romneycare, and the blunderer of “the 47 percent.”

They shouldn’t celebrate too soon. The person happiest to see Romney go is a political squish, a key supporter of Common Core, a fan of amnesty for illegal immigrants, and a basher of the base. Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush must be grinning ear-to-ear this morning.

The latest poll from Fox News shows Romney clocking in at 21 percent, with Mike Huckabee and Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) tied at 11 percent; Jeb Bush runs fourth at 10 percent. Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, who wowed crowds in Iowa over the weekend, draws 8 percent, while Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), an establishment favorite with Tea Party ties, draws just 5 percent. Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) and former Texas Governor Rick Perry both draw 4 percent, with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal clocking in at a negligible 2 percent.

Without Romney, Jeb Bush jumps to 15 percent, with Rand Paul and Mike Huckabee trailing at 13 percent. Jeb’s also got all the money. Bush likely jumped into the race earlier than expected – he announced in December 2014 – in order to preclude Romney from running. By sucking up all the coastal donors, Bush prevented Romney from gaining momentum among those who matter most: the establishment types who backed him to the hilt in 2012. Just eight days ago, Romney met with Bush in Utah to discuss the presidential race. Just over a week later, Romney is out, and coastal donors’ choice has now come down to Jeb Bush and the largely-discredited Chris Christie, who now trails badly in polls.

The conservative base, meanwhile, splits a thousand ways. Walker has momentum for the moment, but Cruz has a significant ground operation in Iowa. Paul has his father’s base and a strong libertarian appeal in New Hampshire. Huckabee won Iowa in 2008 and could pose a threat in South Carolina as well.

And Jeb? All he has to do is run competitive in New Hampshire – where Bush currently leads slightly – hope that Iowa and South Carolina go to a largely underfunded candidate like Mike Huckabee (or better yet, split), and then win Florida in a walk. This is former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s firewall strategy from 2008, except that Jeb won’t abandon New Hampshire.

Mitt Romney did the right thing by stepping out of the race; he’s an old face, and he had his shot in 2012. By getting out, he opens the door to other candidates. Unfortunately, the candidate he may have most boosted is the man who most resembles him politically, to the consternation of conservatives across the country.

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Pulling A Scott Walker – Newly Elected Republican Governor Of Illinois Declares War On Government Unions

Illinois’ New Republican Governor Just Declared War On Government Unions – Daily Caller

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Illinois’ newly elected Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner attacked labor unions during a speech Tuesday, saying they are responsible for many problems that plague his state.

Throughout his speech, Rauner took aim at “government union bosses,” calling them corrupt for contributing to Democratic candidates in return for favorable deals.

“The taxpayer’s on the outside,” Rauner said during his speech in Decatur, according to Northern Public Radio.

“It’s a conflict of interest. It’s a closed loop. This is what’s going on,” Rauner continued. “It’s driving up our bureaucracy and jobs are leaving.”

“The unions that contract with the state: I think it’s the No. 1 conflict of interest in our state today,” Rauner declared.

Rauner pointed towards Prevailing Wage Laws and Project Labor Agreements as some of the few examples of how labor unions drive up costs through unfair laws.

According to The Illinois Policy Institute, the state is struggling in jobs and education, two areas vital to economic growth and stability.

“Illinois’ low standing for total job growth is unusual given that Illinois has the largest population in the Midwest and the fifth largest nationally,” the Institute noted in a report for 2014. “It takes a particularly toxic combination of bad policy and corrupt dealings to hinder such a large and talented workforce from keeping up with the likes of Kentucky and Connecticut.”

“Illinois tracks last of all states for private-sector job creation in 2014, one of only four states to be negative for jobs on the year,” the report added.

The governor also addressed right-to-work legislation. Though he is hesitant to support it as a state law, Rauner does say local leaders should decide for themselves if they want such legislation. Under a right-to-work law, workers cannot be forced into a union as a condition of employment.

“I’m not advocating Illinois becoming a right-to-work state, but I do advocate local governments being allowed to decide whether they’re right-to-work zones,” Rauner said according to The Associated Press.

Some union leaders are already attacking Rauner for deceiving voters during the election last year: While running for governor, Rauner said he was not anti-union.

“It’s taken him less than two weeks to show his true colors,” Sean Stott of the Laborer’s International Union told Northern Public Radio.

Scott says the governor’s plans will drive down wages and lead to a loss of jobs, and not just for union members.

Illinois AFL-CIO President Michael Carrigan, called the governor’s speech, “failed right-wing economic policy.”

“The Bruce Rauner that managed to mask his true feelings about working families for most of last year showed his true agenda today,” Carrigan told Insurance News Net in a statement. “Much like his past proposal to cut the minimum wage, he is now going after workers on all fronts by supporting right to work, attacking unemployment insurance and workers compensation, as well as prevailing wage and project labor agreements that benefit both workers and the taxpayers.”

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