Leftist Astroturf Update: Ferguson Protesters Protest Not Getting Their Checks For Protesting

Ferguson Protesters Protest Not Getting Their Checks For Protesting – Weasel Zippers

On May 14, protesters, upset with not being paid their promised checks for protesting, protested outside MORE, Missourians Organizing For Reform and Empowerment, an ACORN organization which had received funding through George Soros to fund the protests.

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They even started a hashtag, #cutthechecks, to demand their money:

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Some folks had apparently been paid like Deray McKesson, and others hadn’t, causing further discord.

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This protester indicates those who protested for more money were paid $2700 to stop making a fuss, but it would then impact the ability to protest over the summer in #Ferguson:

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Update: More Proof Of Paid Protesters: Ad Asking For Protesters To Travel To Protest, List Of Payouts To #Ferguson Protest Organizers

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Amtrak Crash: Train Hit Curve Going Twice The Legal Speed Limit – 7 Dead, 200 Injured

Amtrak Crash: Train Appears To Have Hit Curve Going Over 100 MPH – Wall Street Journal

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An Amtrak train involved in a fatal crash here appears to have been traveling at more than 100 miles an hour as it entered a sharp curve where it derailed Tuesday night, killing at least seven people, according to two people with knowledge of the investigation.

The speed limit in that section of track drops to 50 miles an hour, according to the Federal Railroad Administration.

Investigators are focusing on the possibility that excessive speed was a factor in the derailment, one of these people said. The locomotive and all seven passenger cars of the train went off the tracks at a tight curve at Frankford Junction, north of Philadelphia city center. Multiple cars overturned, severely injuring some passengers and pinning others. At least seven people were killed, and more than 200 were injured, including eight who were in critical condition.

Amtrak officials notified some employees on a Wednesday conference call that excessive speed was believed to have contributed to the crash, said one of these people, who was briefed on the contents of the call.

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A spokeswoman for the National Transportation Safety Board, which is probing the accident, said speed was among the many factors it would be investigating in the crash.

The northbound train was carrying 238 passengers and five crew members when it derailed about 9:30 p.m. Tuesday on its way to New York.

Investigators on Wednesday searched through the wreckage, as officials worked to account for all passengers who were on the northbound train on its way to New York.

Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter said Wednesday officials have yet to match a manifest from Amtrak against lists of people admitted to hospitals. More than 200 people went to area hospitals, according to Samantha Phillips, director of Emergency Management for the city. Many have since been released.

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Among the victims were Associated Press employee Jim Gaines, a 48-year-old father of two from Plainsboro, N.J., and a midshipman at the U.S. Naval Academy. New York state Assemblyman Phillip Goldfeder identified the midshipman as Justin Zemser from Queens, N.Y. Mr. Zemser was on leave from the academy in Annapolis, Md., and heading home when the accident occurred.

Reported missing was Rachel Jacobs, 39 years old, a CEO for Philadelphia technology company ApprenNet who lives in New York with her husband and toddler son, according to a co-worker.

Mr. Nutter said a “black box” data recorder aboard the train had been recovered and is being analyzed at an Amtrak facility in Delaware. He said it was too soon to speculate on the cause of the accident.

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“We are heartbroken at what has happened here,” Mr. Nutter said at a news conference. “We have not experienced anything like this in modern times.”

Robert Sumwalt, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board, the lead agency investigating the accident, said investigators would study a variety of factors, including the condition of the track, train signals, the mechanical condition of the train and human performance.

Mr. Nutter said the train’s engineer, who wasn’t identified, was treated after the accident and gave a statement to Philadelphia police.

A White House spokesman said President Barack Obama called Mr. Nutter and Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf to express his condolences and praise the work of first responders. “Michelle and I were shocked and deeply saddened to hear of the derailment,” Mr. Obama said in a written statement. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families and friends of those we lost last night, and to the many passengers who today begin their long road to recovery.”

The train originated in Washington and was due in New York about 10:30 p.m. But shortly after leaving Philadelphia’s 30th Street Station, the train began to jerk and rock, passengers said. They described a frightening scene that arrived with little warning as the train left the rails.

Andrew Brenner, 29, a public-relations expert who lives in Washington, D.C., said he was relaxing and texting in the last car with his shoes off. He said he noticed that the train seemed to be taking a curve rather fast, but it didn’t cause much alarm. Then, the train jolted and swayed. Within moments, Mr. Brenner said he and other passengers were tossed around cars as seats were ripped from the train floor.

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“I got thrown like a penny,” said Mr. Brenner, who said he weighs 250 pounds. “That is how violent this was.”

After the crash, Mr. Brenner said he was taken along with other passengers by bus to a hospital, where X-rays showed damage to his vertebrae.

Brooklyn, N.Y., resident Beth Davidz, 35, said she remembered only a hard turn and a jerk. “Then it was just blackness. I was bouncing up and down in blackness,” she said.

Although she tried not to look at the wreckage as she left the train, she noticed the first and second cars looked badly damaged. “I didn’t see anyone getting out,” said Ms. Davidz, a project director with a Philadelphia-based startup.

More than 120 firefighters and 200 police responded to the chaotic scene that included several badly mangled railcars, officials said.

One car was flipped nearly onto its roof, another was close to toppled, and three were on their sides, the Federal Railroad Administration said. The engine and two cars stayed upright.

Rescue workers used hydraulic tools to help some trapped passengers escape from the wreckage, Mr. Nutter said.

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Train service was canceled Wednesday between Philadelphia and New York, but New Jersey Transit plans to honor Amtrak tickets between New York and Trenton, N.J., Amtrak said. Mayor Nutter said Tuesday night he expected service between Philadelphia and New York could be shut down for the rest of the week.

Modified Amtrak service is planned between Washington and Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Philadelphia, and New York and Boston.

Temple University Hospital, which has a trauma center, said it had received 54 patients from the crash. Hospital spokesman Jeremy Walter said, Wednesday morning that one passenger died overnight and 25 remained at the hospital, including eight in critical condition. The injuries included broken bones and other limb injuries, he said.

Many patients taken to hospitals with lacerations and bruises had been released by Wednesday morning. Of 26 people treated at Aria Health’s Frankford hospital near the crash site, 21 people were released, a spokeswoman for Aria Health said Wednesday.

Two patients had been transferred to the University of Pennsylvania Hospital and three went to Aria Health’s Torresdale hospital. At Torresdale, 24 of 30 people admitted directly to the hospital had been released, the spokeswoman said, while a total of nine people remained hospitalized Wednesday morning.

Many of the patients at the Frankford campus walked in on their own and had lacerations, she said. She didn’t have details about the Torresdale patients.

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Hahnemann University Hospital received two patients, and Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia said it received 10 patients.

The FRA said it was sending at least eight investigators to the scene, including acting Administrator Sarah Feinberg. The NTSB said it had a team on site Wednesday morning, and U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Fox said Transportation Department officials were heading to the scene.

The crash occurred in the Port Richmond section of the city, a mix of residential and industrial buildings along the Delaware River. Mr. Nutter said the accident resulted in a four-alarm response from area fire stations. He described the accident as a Level 3 mass-casualty incident based on the number of people involved.

The last crash of this magnitude along the heavily-traveled Northeast Corridor occurred in 1987 near Baltimore. Sixteen people were killed when a Conrail train ignored signals and collided with an Amtrak train. The accident sparked several safety reforms.

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*VIDEO* Steven Crowder: Of Course We Should Draw Muhammad


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Freddie Gray Protests Spread Like Cancer To New York

Over 120 Arrested As Freddie Gray Protests Spill Over To NYC – New York Post

The anxiety and unrest that has crippled Baltimore spilled over into the Big Apple Wednesday as more than 120 people were arrested across Manhattan in scuffles with cops during protests over the death of Freddie Gray, sources said.

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Hundreds of demonstrators, who first gathered at Union Square for what was supposed to be a peaceful rally, erupted into a free-for-all in the streets at about 7:30 p.m. as groups splintered off to create havoc around town.

“What do we want? Justice! If we don’t get it? Shut it down!” protesters chanted as officers started to detain people and corral them in police vans.

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The demonstration was billed as a show of support for protesters in Baltimore, where a nightly curfew was imposed this week following riots sparked by Gray’s death from injuries suffered while in police custody.

From Union Square, protesters marched along East 17th Street toward Fifth Avenue before being stopped by police.

An NYPD helicopter hovered overhead and a police loudspeaker warned protesters that they would be arrested if they marched in the street.

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As some protesters resisted arrest, cops carried them by their limbs and shackled them.

Other protesters trying to breach barricades were shoved back by cops.

Then rowdy agitators began to push back at cops and some even started throwing punches along 17th Street and Fifth Avenue, where dozens of ­arrests were made.

The protest then split off into factions. Some marched toward the Holland Tunnel, where outbound traffic was briefly halted. Others took to the West Side Highway and marched up to Times Square.

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“Black lives matter. No justice, no peace,” protesters chanted as they marched through Times Square.

Meanwhile, in beleaguered Baltimore, the second night of a state-imposed curfew went mostly without incident as concerned members of the community formed groups and urged citizens to head home and not partake in violence.

In Washington, DC, protesters stood in front of the White House with signs bearing slogans in support of Gray and Michael Brown, who was shot dead by police in Ferguson, Mo., last year.

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Protests returned to Ferguson as well – one day after looting, fires and gunfire in Baltimore protests over Gray.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake defended her handling of the situation in her city, denying a report that she had told police commanders to “stand down” and let protesters vent their rage.

Rawlings-Blake, 45, a Democrat, said state officials were involved in decision-making from the beginning – and she mocked Republican Gov. Larry Hogan’s claims that he didn’t receive return phone calls from her as the riots unfolded Monday afternoon after the funeral for Gray.

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“When he has people right there in the [emergency operations] center with us, the notion that he didn’t get a call back from me directly… that’s absurd,” the mayor said as tensions showed signs of easing in the city.

A senior law enforcement source told Fox News that Rawlings-Blake had ordered her officers to stand down as the rioters torched buildings and cars and looted stores.

Asked if Rawlings-Blake had been responsible for the order, the source said, “You’re goddamn right [she] was.”

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Later, when asked by Fox News if there had been a “hold-back” order to police, Rawlings-Blake said, “No… you have to understand, it’s not ‘holding back.’ It’s ­responding appropriately.”

Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Rawlings-Blake, said, “What we’ve always tried to say is, this is a very fluid situation. We will use these tools [curfews] as long as they’re needed.

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“But the second it comes that we feel they’re not needed anymore, we won’t keep the curfews in place and we won’t keep the National Guard here.”

New US Attorney General Loretta Lynch, meanwhile, condemned the rioting, calling it “senseless acts of violence.”

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Maryland National Guard FINALLY Brought In To Stop Obama Supporters From Destroying Baltimore

Baltimore Streets Fill With National Guard Troops – WorldNetDaily

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National Guard troops filled the streets of Baltimore in the early morning Tuesday hours, bringing a semblance of calm to a city that was overrun with protesters who had set their sights on police, injuring 15 so far in the melees.

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Fox News reported some of the injuries were due to bottles hurled at police, but all are expected to fully recover.

“We went to bed last night and the entire city smelled like smoke,” said Peter Doocy, from Fox News on Tuesday morning. “We woke up this morning and it’s pretty much the same thing.”

Media pictures showed buildings torched and smoking, firefighters on the scene working to put out lingering flames and glass scattered throughout the streets from broken business windows. At least 50 businesses and buildings, including a church, have been damaged by protesters.

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Southern Baptist church’s newly built senior center

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Convenience store and residence at East Biddle Street and Montford Avenue

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CVS pharmacy on Pennsylvania Avenue

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Much of last night’s rioting was due to teenagers roaming the streets, Fox News reported. Schools were closed and classes on Tuesday were cancelled.

Meanwhile, 1,500 members of the National Guard are patrolling the streets in tactical vehicles, and hundreds of police officers from outside the city are expected to arrive in the coming hours, Fox News reported.

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The scene outside City Hall, where much of the rioting on Monday had occurred, was actually calm and quiet Tuesday morning, due largely to the massive National Guard and police presence that’s been called to the city.

So far, about two dozen people have been arrested, though their charges aren’t known.

The city’s been suffering through hours of violence and thuggery, with media pictures of the scene showing car fires and swarms of angry individuals throwing rocks and breaking business windows. The protests started shortly after the funeral of Freddie Gray, the young black man who died from massive spinal injuries shortly after being taken into police custody.

A curfew that was supposed to have gone into place Monday night is now set for Tuesday evening at 10 o’clock. Much ofthe city’s violence is being blamed on poor leadership, with the mayor, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, fielding particularly harsh fire for comments she made seeiming to suggest the protesters had a real cause and police officers were setting aside space for them to vent.

She’s since backtracked on those comments, and blamed the press for taking her out of context.

This is what she said over the weekend: “While we tried to make sure that [protesters] were protected from the cars and the other things that were going on, we also gave those who wished to destroy space to do that as well.”

Late Monday, facing widespread criticism from her remarks, she said: “I made it very clear that we balanced a very fine line between giving peaceful protesters space to protest. What I said is, in doing so, people can hijack that and use that space for bad. I did not say that we were accepting of it, I did not say we were passive to it. I was just explaining how property damage can happen during a peaceful protest. IT is very unfortunate that members of your industry [media] decided to mischaracterize my words and try to use it as a way to say that we are inciting violence, there is no such thing.”

Meanwhile, members of the media on the scene say the majority of the protesters were residents of the community, and they were destroying buildings, businesses and properties in their own back yards.

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Baltimore Erupts Into Chaos As Likely Obama Supporters Decide To Riot Over Freddie Gray Death (Pictures)

Baltimore Erupts Into Chaos: Protesters Clash With Police, Smash Windows, And Attack Baseball Fans – Intellihub

What started as a series of peaceful rallies held to protest the circumstances surrounding the death of Freddie Gray turned into chaos when groups of protesters turned violent, attacking police and harassing stunned baseball fans outside Camden Yards.

Thousands of protesters took to the streets of downtown Baltimore in what was originally a peaceful rally at city hall to protest the death of Gray, who died last Sunday from spinal injuries and whose death has added fuel to the racial fire just months after Ferguson.

“The mood shifted dramatically when several scores of protesters moved on to the Camden Yards baseball stadium, an hour before the scheduled start of a Baltimore Orioles-Boston Red Sox game,” reported the Associated Press.

“Clashes have broken out in Baltimore’s Camden Yards as demonstrators began throwing bottles at police and smashing cars. Thousands of marchers took to the streets to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a black man who died after being detained by police.”

Over 1,500 protesters gathered near the spot that Gray was arrested at on April 12th and eventually moved to city hall where they replaced the American flag with a black and white flag in apparent protest of the country itself.

“The Baltimore PD were out in force and had been keeping a watchful eye over the protesters. Some of the demonstrators had urged law enforcement officers to “stand down,” while they were also holding placards and shouting, “hands up, don’t shoot” at the cops. Chants of “Freddie, Freddie” could also be heard from the sizable number of demonstrators,” reported RT.

Fans at the Baltimore Orioles baseball game taking place at Camden Yards as the protests raged outside were temporarily forced to stay inside the stadium after an announcement came over the loudspeaker that informed them that for safety reasons the Mayor of Baltimore was “asking” everyone to stay inside and not attempt to leave.

Before the game even started fans at or near the bars outside of the stadium found themselves in the crosshairs of the protesters.

Breitbart reporter Matthew Boyle was in attendance and his report on the mayhem and violence targeted at random baseball fans by a small segment of the protesters is horrific. Fans were attacked with beer bottles, cans, and other projectiles for no apparent reason.

All of a sudden – literally as my brother and I walked out of Bullpen – everything went haywire. What were peaceful marchers holding up signs turned into violent rioters. Innocent fans standing by were confronted by the rioters, who physically and verbally threateningly engaged many of them – and then the protesters got even more violent.

All of a sudden, beer bottles and cans, and other projectiles were lobbed by the protesters into the crowds of fans. To get those projectiles, the protesters stole them forcibly from the bartenders and vendors set up outside each of those three bars. One beer can whizzed by my brother’s face, missing him by about six inches, and more flew all over the crowded area.

The crowd of protesters then stopped a blue station wagon carrying a white family as they tried to drive past Pickles, Bullpen and Sliders along a narrow one-way stretch between the bars and the main road. As a horde of them smashed their open and closed fists on the hood of the car – while impeding them by standing in front of them – the driver backed up on the one way pass in a desperate attempt to get out of dodge. Then, stopped on the other side with nowhere to go, protesters ripped open the passenger door of the car and began reaching around inside the vehicle. As hundreds of people looked on, including several police officers who didn’t engage the violent protesters, the white woman in the front seat – middle-aged and a little heavyset with dark hair – was visibly terrified. The group of black men who ripped open the car door suddenly realized they were separated from the larger group of protesters and abandoned their quest to seemingly either carjack the station wagon or rob the people inside in front of hundreds, driving out of the one-way street back onto the main road and presumably out of dodge.

As projectiles continued flying everywhere from each part of the crowd – like a war-zone – another black man then charged into the crowd of Red Sox and Orioles fans standing outside Pickles Pub and tore the metal barricades apart throwing them into the now-crowded one-way pass where the assaulted station wagon was a moment ago.

My brother, at this point, was screaming at the group of five or so police officers. “Why aren’t you doing anything? They’re hurting people! They’re hurting people! They’re violent!” he yelled at them as they continued ignoring him and not engaging or attempting to stop the violence. (emphasis mine)

The alternative media was out in full force, with multiple independent news outlets and individuals documenting the protests, bypassing the corrupt mainstream media and bringing power to the people through live on the scene video reporting.

Talk show host and independent journalist Pete Santilli livestreamed the protests throughout the day, releasing numerous raw, uncut videos that provide a much deeper look into the days events than a two minute news clip ever could.

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