Authorities Ignored Woman’s Rape Allegations Against Obama Dreamer Who Later Raped Her Again

Authorities Ignored Woman’s Rape Allegations Against Illegal Immigrant Who Later Raped Her Again – Daily Caller


Authorities didn’t act on a woman’s rape allegations against a Honduran man in the U.S. illegally until after he came back months later to kidnap and rape her again in front of their 2-year-old child.

Jose Amaya-Vasquez, a Honduran man that has entered the U.S. three times illegally, was scheduled to appear in court Monday after allegedly kidnapping and raping his ex-girlfriend during a four-day drive in May from Kansas City, Mo., to Camden, N.J.

The woman first called police after she claimed she was raped by Amaya-Vasquez Feb. 14 in her home in Kansas City. But an arrest warrant for that incident wasn’t issued until after Amaya-Vasquez was captured in Camden May 26.

According to a probable cause statement obtained by The Daily Caller News Foundation, authorities interviewed the victim months earlier after he picked up a knife and put it to her throat, and said, “we’re going to have sex or you’ll never see your kids again.”

Despite the language, the arrest warrant wasn’t filed until May 26 and Amaya-Vasquez remained in the U.S. illegally for another three months when it was finally acted on following his arrest.

Separate court documents that were filed last week in New Jersey go into detail about Amaya-Vasquez’s criminal history but don’t bring up the alleged rape in February.

The man originally entered the U.S. in 2005 and wasn’t caught by police until last year when he was immediately deported. He again entered the country from the Mexican border two months later and was sentenced to 30 days in jail and received a 20-year ban from the U.S.

It is unclear when Amaya-Vasquez entered the U.S. the third time.



Stocks End Down Again – Worst 3-Day Point Decline In History Of Dow Jones

DOW, S&P Close Lower In Biggest Reversal Since Oct. 08 – CNBC

U.S. stocks closed lower, after a failed attempt to rally from the Dow’s worst 3-day point decline in history, as investor confidence waned amid continued concerns about China and global growth.

The Dow Jones industrial average and the S&P 500 closed about 1.3 percent lower after rallying nearly 3 percent earlier, their biggest reversal to the downside since Oct. 29, 2008. The S&P 500 remained in correction territory after falling there on Monday. The index also posted its first six-day losing streak since July 2012.

“That crash (Monday) was so big and so long since we had one (investors) don’t want a repeat of 2008 so they bail out,” said Lance Roberts, general partner at STA Wealth Management.

The Dow fell 205 points and S&P 500 closed below 1,900 after falling into negative territory in the last half hour of trade. The Nasdaq Composite failed to hold slight gains and closed 0.44 percent lower.

The Dow traveled another 1,600 points during Tuesday’s trading session, adding to the 4,900 points the index traveled in down and up moves on Monday.

DJIA intraday moves


“Whatever triggered the consternation in the last few trading sessions is likely to be replayed again,” said Mark Luschini, chief investment strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott. He said a negative close “would be a set up to grind sideways to work out this process, if this rally and enthusiasm can’t last I think it’s an indicator (of that consternation).”

The major averages began paring gains in late morning trade after the European close.

“This is typical after a wild swing we had yesterday,” said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capital. “It’s just going to take some time for confidence to rebuild in the market.”

Earlier, the Dow gained as much as 441.5 points and the Nasdaq outperformed, up more than 3.5 percent. Morning leaders such as Netflix and Chinese stocks such as and Baidu still closed more than 4 percent higher. Alibaba gained 4.2 percent.

However, Apple clung to gains of just 0.6 percent after earlier surging more than 7 percent.

In the open, no S&P 500 stocks in the index hit new 52-week highs or lows, after about 200 names hit new 52-week lows Monday.

Morning gains fell short of recouping Monday’s more-than-3.5 percent plunge and the Dow remained on pace for its biggest monthly percentage loss since February 2009 and the Nasdaq since 2008. The S&P 500 was on track for its largest percentage loss since May 2010.

“It’s not as great as a bounce that many were anticipating,” said Kevin Mahn, chief investment officer at Hennion and Walsh. “I think obviously the market sold off far more than it should have.”

“We kind of dipped into that correction territory but we’re not going to stay there,” he said, noting the S&P 500 should trade more in pullback territory between 5 to 10 percent than in correction mode, between 10 to 20 percent lower.

Some of the things “bothering markets yesterday were China and collapsing commodity prices and both of those have given us some relief and when I look at China I don’t look at the Shanghai market. I look at the Hong Kong market,” James Meyer, chief investment officer at Tower Bridge Advisors, said of the morning rally.

The Hang Seng closed up 0.72 percent, while the Nikkei plunged 4 percent and the Shanghai Composite extended recent losses to fall below the psychologically key 3,000 mark, down 7.6 percent. However, European stocks surged, with the DAX up nearly 5 percent.

Crude oil futures settled up $1.07, or 2.80 percent, at $39.31 a barrel. Brent traded more than 1 percent higher to above $43 a barrel.

For the rally to be real “we have to end strong and follow-through tomorrow,” Meyer said.

In early trade Tuesday, Dow futures spiked above 600 points, implying an open of more than 450 points.

U.S. stock index futures extended gains after the Chinese central bank announced plans early in the morning ET to cut its one year lending rate to 4.6 percent, which the People’s Bank of China said was provide long-term liquidity and help support the economy.

“I’m looking for every reason to be a buyer,” said Nick Raich, CEO of The Earnings Scout, who remains bearish on equities. “We’re not upgrading our view at this point until we see topline growth… until then it’s going to be hard to sustain a rally.”

For Tuesday’s open, the New York Stock Exchange invoked Rule 48 for the second day in a row, Dow Jones reported.

The exchange used the rule before Monday’s open after futures for several major averages hit limit down. The last time the rule was used was during the financial crisis.

Stocks plummeted on Monday, with the S&P 500 joining the other major averages in correction territory. Nine of the 10 sectors are in correction territory, with consumer staples less than 1 percent away.

The Dow had its biggest intraday swing ever, falling as much as 1,089 points in the open on Monday. U.S. stocks closed more than 3.5 percent lower, off session lows in high volume trade as fears of slowing growth in China pressured global markets.

Cumulative trade volume was 13.94 billion shares as of 4:00 p.m. ET, the highest volume day since Aug. 10, 2011. Composite trade volume on the New York Stock Exchange was 6.57 billion shares, the heaviest since Oct. 27, 2011.

High-frequency trading accounted for 49 percent of Monday’s total trade volume of 14.2 billion shares, according to TABB Group. Average daily trade volume month-to-date is 7.5 billion shares, with high-frequency trading accounting for 49 percent. During the peak levels of high-frequency trading in 2009, about 61 percent of 9.8 billion of average daily shares traded were executed by high-frequency traders.

Trade volume was tepid throughout most of Tuesday’s session before accelerating into the close as the major averages sold off.

Housing data out Tuesday missed expectations slightly but continued to indicate strength in the market. New home sales figures for July came in at an annual rate at 507,000. The Case-Shiller home price indices for June showing home prices rose less than expected.

In other economic news, the Conference Board’s consumer confidence indicator for August rose to 101.5, beating expectations.

“So far it doesn’t appear that we’ve had any disease from the foreign markets (in the economy),” Luschini said.

The U.S. dollar traded about 1 percent higher against major world currencies, with the euro lower near $1.15 and the yen trimming losses against the greenback near 118 yen.

Treasury yields jumped from lows touched Monday, with the 10-year Treasury yield at 2.09 percent, off highs of near 2.14 percent, and the 2-year note yield at 0.60 percent after trading near 0.64 percent.

The Treasury Department auctioned $26 billion of two-year notes at a high yield of 0.663 percent, lower than the previous July auction. Demand was below average and the lowest since October.

In earnings, Best Buy, Toll Brothers and Sanderson Farms reported before the market open.

Best Buy surged 12.57 percent. The electronic retailer beat estimates by 15 cents with adjusted quarterly profit of 49 cents per share, with revenue also beating forecasts. Same-store sales rose 2.7 percent, compared to the Thomson Reuters forecast of a 1.0 percent increase.

Toll Brothers plunged nearly 8 percent after reporting a decline in profits year-over-year. The luxury homebuilder did report a 12 percent rise in third-quarter orders.

Sanderson Farms closed 0.09 percent lower after the poultry producer posted earnings that fell substantially shy of the $2.90 consensus estimate with quarterly profit of $2.27, while revenue was also below forecasts. The company said a key factor in the quarter’s results was continued pricing pressure.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 204.91 points, or 1.29 percent, at 15,666.44, with Merck plunging 5.2 percent as the greatest laggard and Apple and Walt Disney the only advancers.

The Dow transports also reversed intraday gains to close down 1.7 percent, solidly in correction territory.

The S&P 500 closed down 25.59 points, or 1.35 percent, at 1,867.62, with utilities plunging more than 3 percent to lead all 10 sectors lower.

The Nasdaq closed down 19.76 points. or 0.44 percent, at 4,506.49. The iShares Nasdaq Biotechnology ETF (IBB) closed up 0.17 percent, losing intraday gains of more than 3 percent.

The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX), widely considered the best gauge of fear in the market, traded near 37 after spiking above 50 on Monday, its highest level since February 2009.

About nine stocks declined for every seven advancers on the New York Stock Exchange, with an exchange volume of nearly 1.3 billion and a composite volume of nearly 5.2 billion in the close.

Gold settled down $15.30 at $1,138.30 an ounce.



Obama Crime Syndicate Update: Regime Violates Executive Amnesty Injunction… AGAIN!

‘OOPS!’ Feds Violate Executive Amnesty Injunction… Again! – Breitbart


The government has once again violated a federal court’s injunction prohibiting the implementation of President Obama’s executive amnesty plan. The action comes right before high-ranking federal government officials, including the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), have been ordered to appear in an August hearing to show why they should not be held in contempt for prior failures to comply with the injunction.

The litigation began in December 2014 when the state of Texas and 25 other states filed a federal lawsuit to halt President Obama’s amnesty plan.

A federal judge in Brownsville, Judge Andrew Hanen, issued an injunction in early February temporarily stopping the implementation of the executive amnesty plan.

In April, Judge Hanen issued a scathing rebuke directed at government lawyers and the DHS for misrepresentations made in the case, ordered the government to produce related documents, and warned the government against destroying any of this evidence, as reported by Breitbart Texas.

On July 7th, Judge Hanen ordered top Obama administration officials to personally appear in his court.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, and all other federal defendants, were ordered to attend a hearing on August 19th at 10 a.m. to show why the judge should not hold them in contempt of court.

Other defendant top officials ordered to appear include: R. Gil Kerlikowske, commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection; Leon Rodriguez, director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services; Sarah R Saldana, director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement; and Ronald D. Vitiello, deputy chief of U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Customs and Border of Protection.

The judge said he would cancel the hearing if a report ordered filed on July 31st satisfied him that the situation had been remedied. “Otherwise, the Court intends to utilize all available powers to compel compliance.”

The government’s latest report, and supplemental report, were filed just a few weeks before the July 31st compliance date.

Lawyers for the federal government have been working on the reports, called an “advisory,” to update the judge.

When compiling the report, the government found yet another failure by the federal government to follow the federal judge’s orders. The government has had to scurry in an attempt to avoid further wrath by the judge.

A government contractor mailed approximately 500 cards extending work and stay authorizations.

The executive amnesty plan would expand from two to three years, work authorizations and stays in the U.S.

The cards had been mailed prior to the injunction but were returned because of a problem with the addresses. The contractor updated the addresses and then mailed them out again – this time after the court’s injunction.

The government assures the Court that it is taking immediate actions to address the new violations.

The government says they have attempted to remedy this new problem by sending letters to these individuals demanding that they return the cards.

In his July order, Judge Hanen warned the government if violations which had been committed as of that time had not been corrected, and corrected by the end of the month, “the only logical conclusion is that the Government needs a stronger motivation to comply with lawful orders.”

He continued, “Neither side should interpret this Court’s personal preference to not sanction lawyers or parties as an indication that it will merely acquiesce to a party’s unlawful conduct.”

The judge noted in his July 7th order that there had been “approximately 2,000 individuals that were given various benefits in violation of this Court’s order after the injunction was issued.”

He wrote, “The Court was first apprised by the Government of the violations of its injunction on May 7, 2015. It admitted that it violated this Court’s injunction on at least 2,000 occasions – violations which have not been fixed.”

The judge warned U.S. Department of Justice lawyers and federal officials that “no reasonable person could possibly consider a direct violation of an injunction a side issue.”

He also wrote, “the Court is shocked and surprised at the cavalier attitude the Government has taken with regards to its ‘efforts’ to rectify this situation.”

He noted that the situation had not been corrected six weeks after the government admitted it had violated the orders on May 7th and promised it would mend the situation.

In ordering federal officials to the August 19th hearing in Brownsville, he also ordered that “the Government shall bring all relevant witnesses on this topic as the Court will not continue this matter to a later date.”

At that time, the Court stated that the administration “has not remediated its own violative behavior,” despite the passage of two months. The judge wrote, “That is unacceptable and, as far as the Government’s attorneys are concerned, completely unprofessional.”

Judge Hanen warned, “To be clear, this Court expects the Government to be in full compliance with this Court’s injunction. Compliance as to just those aliens living in the Plaintiff States is not full compliance.”

It is unknown how the Court will take yet another violation of its orders.



Half A Billion Dollars Worth Of American Weapons Fall Into The Hands Of Islamo-Nazis… Again

$500,000,000 Worth Of American Weapons Fall Into The Hands Of Al Qaeda (Again) – Red Statements


A half a billion in US weaponry has fallen into the hands of Islamic extremists in Yemen since the fall of that country’s government. The amount could be considerably higher as the Pentagon and the CIA have covert operations in the country. The number could go much much higher. This is becoming a habit under Obama. In Libya, we had a blockade set up but “somehow” ships got through the greatest Navy on earth and Islamic extremists got themselves half a billion (A coincidence?) dollars worth of weapons.

Those weapons were used in Benghazi, where this administration removed all the security just before the attack. The bad guys got even more weapons meant to go to radical Muslim extremists in Syria. Those weapons went with them to Algeria where they were used in a terror attack there.

Then, while Benjamin Netanyahu was here and Obama was unable to meet him, Obama took a little trip to visit the Emir of Qatar. The Emir is a big time sponsor of terrorism, supporting Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood. They also sponsor this little group in Syria called the Nusra Front. Coincidentally, Obama had sent entire warehouses of weapons to an insurgency group called Harakat Hazm. At about the same time as Obama’s visit to the Emir, Harakat Hazm decided to disband and hand over the warehouses full of US munitions to the Nusra Front.





The Nusra Front has now decided to leave their affiliation with Al Qaeda behind and they intend to become competition for ISIS since they now outgun them.

I’m no military man but I’m not the dumbest person in the world (Mostly because I have a younger sister) but it seems to me if I wanted to provide weapons to a weak government, I would take precautions to make sure they don’t fall into the wrong hands. But hey, that’s just me.

And we are to believe that all of these weapon seizures are coincidences. Frankly, I have my doubts.



President Asshat Attempts Internet Power Grab… Again

Obama’s Internet Power Grab – Canada Free Press

In a completely unsurprising development, one of the two Republican Commissioners on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has made it clear the Obama administration’s effort to regulate the Internet is nothing more than another government power grab.


“President Obama’s plan marks a monumental shift toward government control of the Internet,” said a statement released by commissioner Ajit Pai. “It gives the FCC the power to micromanage virtually every aspect of how the Internet works. The plan explicitly opens the door to billions of dollars in new taxes on broadband… These new taxes will mean higher prices for consumers and more hidden fees that they have to pay.”

Pai continued:

The plan saddles small, independent businesses and entrepreneurs with heavy-handed regulations that will push them out of the market. As a result, Americans will have fewer broadband choices. This is no accident. Title II was designed to regulate a monopoly. If we impose that model on a vibrant broadband marketplace, a highly regulated monopoly is what we’ll get.

Pai’s statement was a response to an op-ed column in Wired magazine by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. He believes “a modernized version” of Title II of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, used to break up AT&T into four distinct Bell companies, should be applied to Internet Service Providers (ISPs). Title II originally came into being under the Communications Act of 1934. Part of it prevented phone companies from engaging in “unjust or unreasonable discrimination” when it came to providing service for their customers. “Using this authority, I am submitting to my colleagues the strongest open internet protections ever proposed by the FCC,” Wheeler wrote last Wednesday. “These enforceable, bright-line rules will ban paid prioritization, and the blocking and throttling of lawful content and services.”

Wheeler, Obama and the rest of their Democratic Party allies want to reclassify broadband as a telecommunications service and regulate ISPs like utility companies, or “common carriers,” rather than “information services” that fall outside FCC regulatory power. The ostensible purpose of the change is to implement “net neutrality” rules. Net neutrality is about preventing ISPs from blocking, slowing down, or diminishing the quality of applications and websites, from charging them higher prices for providing prioritized access, aka “fast lanes,” or giving preferential treatment to their affiliates.

Wheeler has drafted a 332-page plan to address the issue. He denies that it imposes new fees or price regulations. It will go to a vote on Feb. 26, and it expected to pass by a margin of 3-2 when the agency’s two Democrats side with the Chairman. Yet there is a telling indication that Wheeler is being less than forthcoming: just as the Democrats did with ObamaCare, the FCC won’t release the actual text of the plan until after they vote on it.

That doesn’t sit well with Pai. “I believe the public has a right to know what its government is doing, particularly when it comes to something as important as Internet regulation,” he said. “I have studied the 332-page plan in detail, and it is worse than I had imagined.”

He further explained that the part of Title II whereby the FCC is granting itself the authority to determine whether a variety of practices are “just and reasonable,” does give the agency the power to raise prices. “The claim that President Obama’s plan to regulate the Internet does not include rate regulation is flat-out false,” Pai declared. “Indeed, the only limit on the FCC’s discretion to regulate rates is its own determination of whether rates are ‘just and reasonable,’ which isn’t much of a restriction at all.”

Republicans are also incensed. Committees in the House and Senate initiated investigations to determine if the White House improperly influenced the FCC proposal. On Monday, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI), Chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, sent a letter to Wheeler asking him to explain his decision and produce documentation regarding communications and meetings between the White House and FCC officials. Johnson informed Wheeler he was concerned about “apparent pressure exerted on you and your agency by the White House.”

Johnson further noted the plan is “not only a monumental shift from Chairman Wheeler’s original net-neutrality proposal but also a large deviation from the light regulatory touch applied to broadband services since the Clinton administration,” Johnson said in releasing the letter. “The decision is wrong, and the process raises serious questions about the president’s inappropriate influence over what is supposed to be an independent agency that derives its authority from Congress and not the White House,” he added.

Last Friday, Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT), Chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, expressed similar reservations, and also requested “all documents and communications” between the FCC and the White House.

And although the president appoints the FCC Chairman as Obama did with Wheeler in 2013, the agency is in fact supposed to remain independent. Wheeler, however was a major fundraiser for the president. Furthermore, Johnson and Chaffetz cited a Feb. 4 Wall Street Journal article reporting that, back in November, the White House’s top economic advisor gave a “heads up” to Wheeler about Obama’s intention to regulate the Internet like a public utility, an idea the president himself announced four days later. “The prod from Mr. Obama came after an unusual, secretive effort inside the White House, led by two aides who built a case for the principle known as net neutrality through dozens of meetings with online activists, Web startups and traditional telecommunications companies,” the Journal stated. Johnson asked Wheeler if the FCC was aware of that secretive effort.

Gigi Sohn, the FCC’s special counsel for external affairs, tried to downplay the connection. “I think what the president’s statement did was, rather than force the chairman’s hand, was give him cover to do something he already was thinking about doing,” Sohn said in an appearance on C-Span’s “The Communicators” series.

Forcing anyone’s hand at this point is highly problematic. If the FCC passes its proposal, there is little doubt ISPs and broadband carriers would initiate litigation to prevent it from going into effect. The FCC’s track record in court is not promising. In 2007 the agency responded to a complaint that Comcast was restricting customers’ ability to access certain peer-to-peer networks by issuing an order claiming the cable giant violated federal policy. Three years later, the D.C. Circuit Court vacated the order, finding that while the FCC is permitted to take action reasonably ancillary to its statutory mandate, the FCC could point to no such authority in this particular case.

Later in 2010 the FCC adopted the “Open Internet Order,” broadly imposing net neutrality rules, but stopping short of imposing the Title II reclassification of ISPs they are currently seeking. They cited section 706 of the Telecommunication Act of 1996 whereby the FCC “shall encourage the deployment on a reasonable and timely basis of advanced telecommunications capability to all Americans” as the basis for their statutory authority.

In 2011 Verizon sued the FCC and once again, in January 2014 the DC Circuit Court struck down parts of the Open Internet Order. They vacated the FCC’s anti-discrimination and anti-blocking policies, but maintained the requirement that carriers notify their customers regarding what traffic can be blocked and/or run faster.

Hence the FCC’s current effort to impose Title II common carrier regulations, one Pai doesn’t believe will go anywhere. “Courts have twice thrown out the FCC’s attempts at Internet regulation,” he explained. “There’s no reason to think that the third time will be the charm. Even a cursory look at the plan reveals glaring legal flaws that are sure to mire the agency in the muck of litigation for a long, long time.”

Given the Obama administration’s appetite for unassailable power, that is a good thing. Moreover, the Internet has done quite fine without the heavy hand of a federal government that, far more often than not, seeks to “solve” a problem where none really exists. Moreover, lost in this argument is the reality that private enterprise has invested billions of dollars in bringing an invention to people so all-encompassing, they now consider Internet access a “right,” even though it is nothing of the sor and even though Internet providers have adhered to a number of regulations already providing virtually unlimited access to this technology. Yet in their effort to impose greater controls, the Obama administration has embraced one of the American left’s most vexing beliefs: The pernicious notion incentive and coercion are interchangeable terms.



Fox News Stomps Competition Into The Dirt… Again

Boom: Megyn Kelly And Fox News Have Just Buried Their Competition In The Trash Heap – Western Journalism


It was a little more than a year ago – in October 2013 – when Fox News boss Roger Ailes made what many at the time thought was a bold and risky programming move.

Ailes changed FNC’s primetime lineup, a schedule of shows that had been mostly unchanged for the prior 11 years. And quite an 11-year run it had been because in that time, Fox News remained a solid No. 1 in the cable news category in both total viewers and the core adult 25-54 demo.

The biggest change the channel made some thirteen months ago was the primetime addition of a brand new program in the 9pm hour. Where “Hannity” once held forth, Megyn Kelly brought in “The Kelly File,” whose soaring success since its launch has been simply stellar.

Megyn Kelly had risen to fame as an anchor on FNC’s dayside news coverage. A lawyer with a quick wit, a sharp mind, a tenacious interviewing style, and an unforgiving refusal to accept bloviating – plus the ability to hold her own with the likes of Bill O’Reilly – Kelly soon caught on and climbed high.

Now, her climb has reached a notable peak. For the first time ever, reports ratings tracker, “The Kelly File” was the No. 1 show on cable news in the coveted 25-54 demo.

Megyn Kelly is becoming what many in the biz call a “category killer.”

The last time a host other than Bill O’Reilly has won the demo was in Oct. 2012, when the 10pmET hour, which included presidential debates, was No. 1. Fox News has now been the No. 1 cable news channel for 155 consecutive months in total viewers.

As for the standout performance of the Fox News Channel overall, FNC in the month of November was the second most-watched cable channel, topped only by ESPN.

FNC delivered its highest rated month since May 2013 in total viewers and April 2013 in the A25-54 demo, when the Boston Marathon bombing occurred.

Below is a chart that graphically illustrates the outstanding ranking of Fox News in all of cable…and the absolute dominance of the channel in the cable news category.

You”ll note that CNN and MSNBC are nowhere to be seen seen, as MSNBC placed 26th in primetime and 27th in total day; CNN placed 25th in primetime and 20th in total day.




*VIDEO* President Asshat Caught Being A Lying Sack O’ Crap… Again