Muslim Man On FBI Watch List Attacks People In Ohio Restaurant With Machete – Is Shot And Killed By Police

Man Attacks People In Ohio Restaurant With Machete, Police Take Him Out With Taxpayer Relief Shot… Update: Suspect Was Muslim Man On FBI Watch List – Weasel Zippers

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We need machete control.

Via Columbus Dispatch:
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Columbus police have shot and killed a man after they say he went into a Mediterranean restaurant on the Northeast Side this evening and attacked several patrons with a machete.

According to a dispatcher, police were called just after 6 p.m. to the Nazareth Restaurant, 5239 N. Hamilton Road. The dispatcher said that six people were transported to area hospitals from the restaurant, though their names and the extent of their injuries aren’t known at this time.

The suspect then reportedly fled and was stopped by police about 5 miles away, off Stelzer Road and just south of Montclair Drive.

He was shot by police, the dispatcher said, and died at OhioHealth Grant Medical Center at 6:24 p.m.

Further information and the name of the suspect aren’t available at this time.

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HT: Breaking 911

UPDATE: Religion of Peace

Via PJM:
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CBS News has identified the suspect as Mohamed Barry, however neither 10TV nor Columbus Police have confirmed the suspect’s name. CBS News also reports Barry has a Somali background and may have traveled to Dubai in 2012.

Law enforcement tells them the incident appears to be the type of “lone wolf terrorist attacks they’re trying to stop.”

The FBI is assisting in the investigation.

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Your Daley Gator Feel-Good Story O’ The Day

Lakeland Home Invasion Suspect Shot, Killed By Homeowner – WTVT

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A man was shot and killed when deputies say he unlawfully entered a home and fired at two people inside.

The Polk County Sheriff’s Office said it happened at a home on Chestnut Hills Drive around 6:30 a.m. New Year’s Day.

Chevez Antwann Fiason, 24, was shot and killed by the homeowner during the incident. No one else was injured in the incident.

Fiason was said to have a violent arrest history and was released from state prison in March 2015.

“Forcing your way into an occupied residence is a bold and foolish decision – if you are foolish enough to break into someone’s home, you can expect to be shot in Polk County,” Sheriff Grady Judd said.

The incident in under investigation, but no arrests had been made.

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One Muslim Terrorist Killed, Another Surrounded After Gun Battle With Police In Paris Suburb Of Saint-Denis

Woman In A Suicide Belt Is Killed By Police After Heavy Gunfire Breaks Out In Paris Suburb As Mastermind Of Friday’s Attacks Is Surrounded In Flat – Daily Mail

A female terror suspect wearing a suicide vest is believed to have blown herself up as police were involved in a gunfight with up to six other suspected Paris terrorists including the mastermind behind Friday’s massacres.

SWAT teams and special forces have surrounded an apartment in the Parisian suburb of Saint-Denis – close to the Stade de France – in a siege that started at 4.30am this morning.

French media are reporting the architect of the plan that killed 129 people, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, 27, is alive and inside the flat – until now it was thought he was in Syria orchestrating the attack from ISIS capital Raqqa.

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A woman jihadi is said to have fired her AK-47 at police before blowing herself up as an assault squad stormed the apartment block. A rooftop sniper is believed to have shot dead another terror suspect through a window and another is reportedly dead.

Two people may been taken alive and arrested. An innocent person on the street may have been killed.

The chief suspect Salah Abdeslam, 26, who was last seen by police trying to enter Belgium in the hours after the attacks involving nine gunmen, may also be inside.

Machine gun fire and at least seven loud explosions, caused by the suicide bomber and possibly hand grenades, have been heard as the siege continues.
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Police vans, fire trucks and three rushed to the scene in Saint-Denis, north of Paris. The site is a mile from the Stade de France stadium, which was targeted by three suicide bombers during Friday’s attacks.

Baptiste Marie, a 26-year-old journalist who lives near the scene of the stand-off, said: ‘It started with an explosion. Then there was second big explosion. Then two more explosions. There was an hour of gunfire’.

Riot police were clearing the streets early Wednesday, pointing guns at curious residents to move them off the roads.

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Mr Marie said the officers seemed nervous – ‘you could see it in their eyes, ‘ he said.

Resident Amin Guizani, 21, said: ‘There were grenades. It was going, stopping. Kalashnikovs. Starting again’.

Residents have been told to stay in their homes and away from windows and some have been moved to a temporary shelter in the town hall. Police have confirmed that several officers have been hurt.

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French media initially reported the raid is part of an ongoing operation to catch the ninth suspect involved in Friday night’s terror attacks in the French capital, who is thought to be on the run.

There are also unconfirmed reports of at least one fatality, although it is not clear if it is a terrorist or a police officer.

A police official says there have been exchanges of gunfire and special SWAT teams are on the scene, which has been blocked off by dozens of police cars and vans.

Ambulances can be seen and sirens heard in French television footage from the scene.

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BFMTV and iTele both showed amateur video of the shootings and cited witnesses in the area saying they had heard sporadic gunfire since around 4.30am

The suburb of St Denis is where the Stade de France, one of the targets of Friday’s attacks, is located. On Friday three suicide bombers blew themselves up during a friendly football match.

French authorities have said they are searching for at least two people involved in last Friday’s attacks, which killed at least 129 people and seven terrorists.

In all at least 129 people died in Friday’s attacks, which have been claimed by the Islamist militant group ISIS. Seven militants died in the assault. Two are known to be on the run.

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Unconfirmed reports suggest at three people have been taken into custody, although it appears the siege is ongoing.

The suburb’s mayor, Didier Paillard, said transport to St-Denis has been cancelled and schools in the suburb will not open today.

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Obama Dreamer Who Raped And Killed 64-Year-Old Woman Had Been Arrested Four Times But Never Deported

Illegal Alien Who Raped And Killed 64-Yr Old California Woman Had Been Arrested But Not Deported Four Times – Right Scoop

While Dems and some Republicans continue to tell us there is no problem with illegal alien crime, there is more and more attention on the daily stories that Americans are suffering and dying because Obama won’t enforce the laws on the books.

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Here’s another illegal alien crime horror:

A man who allegedly attacked a 64-year-old California woman and brutally raped her is an illegal alien from Mexico who has been arrested four times in the past two years.

The victim, Marilyn Pharis, died eight days after the attack, which occurred July 24 while she was asleep in her Santa Maria home. An autopsy is being conducted to help determine if Pharis died as a direct result of the heinous crime.

Victor Aureliano Martinez Ramirez, 29, was arrested shortly after the attack while he was inside another home nearby.

He is charged with attempted murder, first-degree burglary with person present, assault with intent to commit rape, sexual penetration by foreign object and resisting a peace officer, according to the Santa Maria Times. His bond is set at $1 million.

According to KEYT, Ramirez has been arrested four times over the past two years for narcotics violations. Santa Maria police chief Ralph Martin said Tuesday that Immigration and Customs Enforcement verified that he was in the U.S. illegally. The Santa Maria Times reports that his most recent arrest came in May 2014 and that he is still on probation stemming from that case.

It is unclear why Ramirez was still in the U.S. or whether he has been deported or has a removal order pending against him.

This is exactly why Trump is so popular – he’s one of the few, along with Ted Cruz, who actually dares to talk about this problem and wants to do something about it.

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Massachusetts Grandmother Killed In Her Sleep By Obama Dreamers

Killed In Her Sleep: Illegal Immigrants Suspected In Mass. Grandma’s Death Faced Deportation – Fox News

A Massachusetts woman killed as she slept in her bed by a bullet fired through her ceiling would be alive today, if the men accused of shooting her had been deported, according to anti-illegal immigration activists.

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Mirta Rivera, 41, a nurse and grandmother from Lawrence, was shot July 4 from an upstairs apartment where two illegal immigrants lived despite being under federal deportation orders, according to the Boston Herald. Dominican Republic nationals Wilton Lara-Calmona and Jose M. Lara-Mejia both had long histories of sneaking into the U.S.

The case, as well as a pending murder case in neighboring Connecticut involving an illegal immigrant accused in the stabbing death of a woman, comes after the July 1 murder of Kathryn Steinle in San Francisco helped propel illegal immigrant crime into a hot-button national issue.

“This has been happening all over the country for several years,” said Dan Cadman, a fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies and a retired federal immigration official. “I hope the American public is stirred up and angry about it.

“But I hope they realize there are so many more victims,” he added. “There are families all over the country that are grieving because they lost their mother, father, brother, sister, child or spouse needlessly.”

Lara-Calmona, 38, was deported in April 2012 and arrested for re-entering the country last November, the Herald reported. Lara-Mejia, 35, was nabbed crossing the border in August 2013 and ordered deported in April 2014, but apparently ignored the ruling.

The suspects and a third roommate, Christopher Paganmoux, were charged with trafficking heroin and cocaine after police investigating the shooting found drugs in their home. But the bullet hole in Lara-Mejia’s second-floor bedroom, which penetrated the ceiling above Rivera’s bed, and a Sears and Roebuck .270 bolt-action rifle that matched the bullet found in Rivera’s mattress, are expected to lead to murder charges.

In Norwich, Conn., Jean Jacques, 40, a Haitian illegal immigrant who got out of prison in January after serving 17 years for attempted murder, has been charged with stabbing Casey Chadwick, 25, to death and stuffing her in a closet last month. Jacques’ prison file was marked “Detainer: Immigration,” according to the Norwich Bulletin.

But the case seems to have sparked the same sort of finger-pointing between local, state and federal officials as was seen in the aftermath of the Steinle murder. In that case, ICE officials said they had requested that San Francisco hold Steinle’s alleged killer, Francisco Sanchez, until they could pick him up and evict him from the country. San Francisco refused, with its sheriff later saying it was only a “request,” and that he was not allowed to comply with it.

Connecticut officials say Jacques was released in January to the custody of the U.S. Department of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), but was never deported. While ICE spokesman Shawn Neudauer told the newspaper he was barred by law from discussing Jacques’ case, Connecticut last year became the first state to enact legislation that prohibited law enforcement agencies from holding people simply because federal authorities asked that they be held for deportation.

The measure was touted as a way to strengthen immigrant families and it does not extend to convicted felons such as Jacques or people with a “final order” of deportation.

Because local and state governments rarely pass comprehensive codes detailing their level of non-cooperation with the federal government on illegal immigration, and because the federal government itself has refused to enforce its own immigration laws, it is difficult to say where the blame lies, said one expert.

“We have two-tiered sanctuary policies,” said Bob Dane, spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR). “You have it at the local level, where cities refuse to cooperate, but you also have it at the national level. The Obama administration won’t enforce the laws federally, and the local communities won’t locally.

“You could make the case that America is now a sanctuary country,” Dane said.

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*VIDEO* The Donald Holds Press Conference With Families Of Americans Killed By Illegal Aliens


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7.8 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Nepal – Over 1,300 People Killed

More Than 1,300 People Dead In Monster Nepal Quake: Homes, Offices And Historic Buildings Flattened As 7.8 Earthquake Rocks Capital – Daily Mail

Britain has deployed a team of humanitarian experts to Nepal after a devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake ripped across the region, killing more than 1,300 people in four countries.

The eight-strong team will provide urgent humanitarian support for people affected by the disaster, International Development Secretary Justine Greening announced tonight.

Disaster response specialists, including experts in search and rescue, will travel to Nepal overnight where they will assess the scale of the damage caused by the quake, which destroyed homes, businesses and temples in the capital of Kathmandu.

The earthquake also triggered a massive avalanche on Mount Everest killing eight people and injuring at least 30 climbers. There are also a number of climbers still missing, including a number of Britons.

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Another Briton feared missing is Laura Wood, 23, from Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. She is described by a friend as a ‘glowing lovely beautiful young girl often dressed in hippy type clothing’.

Miss Wood, who has a strong northern accent, has been trekking in the Himalayas without any means of making contact.

Officials today confirmed that at least 1,341 people have died as rescue teams continue to search for survivors who are feared to be trapped under rubble. The death toll is expected to rise.

Effects of the quake were felt hundreds of miles away in neighbouring countries with 36 killed in India, 12 in Tibet and 4 in Bangladesh. Two Chinese citizens died at the Nepal-China border.

Australian Ballantyne Forder, 20, who was working in a number of orphanages around the country, is also feared to be among those killed.

A spokeswoman for Intrepid Travel – which arranges treks in Nepal and around the Everest region – confirmed they had groups with British travellers in the area and said they are still attempting to contact those tours.

The earthquake has also triggered a massive avalanche on Mount Everest killing 18 and injuring at least 30. Several groups of climbers were also said to be trapped at base camp which was severely damaged.

Panicked residents had rushed into the streets as the tremor erupted with the impact felt hundreds of miles away in big swathes of northern India and even in Bangladesh.

Video footage showed people digging through the rubble of the bricks from the collapsed tower, looking for survivors.

Nepal’s capital Kathmandu – with a population of over one million – was one of the worst-hit areas in Nepal, with the quake’s epicentre just 50 miles north of the city. As the tremors intensified, people were seen in scenes of mayhem running from their homes and places of work in panic.

Dozens of people were gathered in the car park of Kathmandu’s Norvic International Hospital, where thin mattresses had been spread on the ground for patients rushed outside, some patients wearing hospital pyjamas, while doctors and nurses were treating people.

The United States Geological Survey said the quake struck 81 kilometres (50 miles) northwest of Kathmandu at 06.11 GMT, with walls crumbling and families racing outside of their homes. The 7.8 magnitude tremor was the worst to hit the poor South Asian nation in over 80 years.

Television footage showed a huge swathe of houses had collapsed in while roads had been split in two by the force of the impact.

India was first to respond to Nepal’s appeal for help by sending in military aircraft with medical equipment and relief teams.

Britain has deployed a team of humanitarian experts to Nepal to provide urgent support for people affected by the quake, International Development Secretary Justine Greening announced tonight.

Ms Greening said: ‘My thoughts are with the people of Nepal, in particular all those who have lost loved ones.

‘The absolute priority must be to reach people who are trapped and injured, and provide shelter and protection to those who have lost their homes.

‘Nepal needs our urgent humanitarian assistance. That is why we have rapidly deployed a team of humanitarian experts who will immediately begin work assessing the damage and helping the Nepalese authorities respond to this devastating earthquake.’

It came after Prime Minister David Cameron pledged that the UK would do all it can to help in the aftermath on the Nepal earthquake.

On Twitter he said: ‘Shocking news about the earthquake in Nepal – the UK will do all we can to help those caught up in it.’

Foreign Secretary, Philip Hammond, added his condolences and said the British Embassy was providing help to any UK nationals caught up in the disaster.

‘My thoughts are with the people of Nepal and everyone affected by the terrible loss of life and widespread damage caused by the earthquake,’ he said.

‘We are in close contact with the Nepalese government. The British Embassy in Nepal is offering our assistance to the authorities and is providing consular assistance to British Nationals.’

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Labour leader Ed Miliband also expressed his sympathy for all those involved, tweeting: ‘The awful scenes in Nepal are heartbreaking. My thoughts go out to the people affected, and to those caring for survivors.’

Vim Tamang, a resident of Manglung village near the epicentre, said: ‘Our village has been almost wiped out. Most of the houses are either buried by landslide or damaged by shaking.’All the villagers have gathered in the open area. We don’t know what to do. We are feeling helpless.’

A terrified Kathmandu resident said: ‘Everything started shaking. Everything fell down. The walls around the main road have collapsed. The national stadiums gates have collapsed,’ Kathmandu resident Anupa Shrestha said.

Indian tourist Devyani Pant was in a Kathmandu coffee shop with friends when ‘suddenly the tables started trembling and paintings on the wall fell on the ground.

‘I screamed and rushed outside,’ she told Reuters by telephone from the capital, where at least 300 people died.

‘We are now collecting bodies and rushing the injured to the ambulance. We are being forced to pile several bodies one above the other to fit them in.’

Pushpa Das, a labourer, ran from the house when the first quake struck but could not escape a collapsing wall that injured his arm.

‘It was very scary. The earth was moving… I am waiting for treatment but the (hospital) staff is overwhelmed,’ he said.

‘The walls of houses have collapsed around me onto the road. All the families are outside in their yards huddled together. The tremors are still going on,’ an AFP reporter added.

Government emergency workers are reportedly already on the scene in the most damaged areas while Save the Children teams on the ground are coordinating an emergency response.

Oxfam is also lending its support to the rescue effort with teams in Nepal already assessing the humanitarian need and a team of technical experts preparing to fly from the UK with supplies to provide clean water, sanitation and emergency food supplies.

And Christian Aid has made an initial £50,000 available to help victims.

Tanya Barron, CEO of Plan International UK, who is in eastern Nepal on a scheduled visit, said she was on the top floor of a building when it started to ‘shake violently’.

She added: ‘It was very scary. Our colleagues advised us that the quake felt much stronger than usual.

‘We are safe and now we are working with our colleagues to respond. There are crowds of people on the streets here and the hospitals are already overwhelmed. Our immediate priorities are to assist the emergency services with search and rescue and to establish shelter.’

A spokeswoman for Intrepid Travel, which arranges treks in Nepal and around the Everest region, said Britons were among their passengers in the area, but would not confirm how many.

Chloe Berman said: ‘We are currently working with our local operations team to contact our groups in the area, and confirm that all passengers, leaders and local ground staff are safe and accounted for.

‘Communications in the region is currently limited. There has been significant damage to infrastructure. Most phone lines are down and mobile coverage is limited.’

Several buildings collapsed in the centre of the capital, the ancient Old Kathmandu, including centuries-old temples and towers, said resident Prachanda Sual.

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Among them was the Dharahara Tower, one of the city’s landmarks built by Nepal’s royal rulers in the 1800s and a Unesco-recognised historical monument.

There were reports of that a body was removed from the tower and a second lay further up the road after it was reduced to rubble. Teams have rescued many more from the ruins. It was not immediately clear how many people were in the multi-storey tower when it collapsed.

‘Our focus is on rescue in the core areas of Kathmandu where the population is concentrated,’ Dinesh Acharya, metropolitan police spokesman, said.

‘Many houses and buildings have collapsed. We don’t know if there have been fatalities yet.’

Old Kathmandu city is a warren of tightly-packed, narrow lanes with poorly-constructed homes piled on top of each other which were vulnerable to collapse.

Residents reported seeing trails of destruction – collapsed walls, broken windows and fallen telephone poles – as they drove through the capital, along with streets filled with terrified people.

‘It’s too early to make any assessment but the damage isn’t as bad as it could have been,’ said Liz Satow, the Nepal director for the air group World Vision who drove from Kathmandu to the nearby town of Lalitpur and added that while there was considerable damage, most buildings were still intact.

A state broadcaster for China that said at least two Chinese tourists had also died at the Nepal-China border.

The powerful earthquake also created an avalanche which swept the face of Mt. Everest killing eight and injuring at least 30 climbers attempting the world’s highest peak – with April the most popular month to attempt the summit

It struck between the Khumbu Icefall, a rugged area of collapsed ice and snow, and the base camp, said Ang Tshering of the Nepal Mountaineering Association.

The disaster has sparked fears for climbers on the world’s highest peak a year after another avalanche caused the deadliest incident on the mountain.

Carsten Lillelund Pedersen, a Dane who is climbing the Everest with a Belgian climber Jelle Veyt, said on his Facebook page that they were at Khumbu Icefall at altitude 16,500ft when the earthquake hit.

He wrote on Facebook that they have started to receive the injured, including one person with the most severe injuries who sustained many fractures.

Romanian climber Alex Gavan said on Twitter that there had been a ‘huge avalanche’ and ‘many, many’ people were up on the mountain.

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‘Running for life from my tent,’ Gavan said. ‘Everest base camp huge earthquake then huge avalanche.’

Another climber, Daniel Mazur, said Everest base camp had been ‘severely damaged’ and his team was trapped.

‘Please pray for everyone,’ he said on his Twitter page.

An avalanche in April 2014 just above the base camp on Mount Everest killed 16 Nepali guides. April is one of the most popular times to climb Everest before rain and clouds cloak the mountain at the end of next month.

Some 230,000 people – nearly half of Nepal’s yearly foreign visitors – come to trek the Himalayas, with 810 attempting to scale Mt. Everest in 2013.

Initially measured at 7.5 magnitude, the quake was later adjusted to 7.9, with a depth of 15 kilometres, the USGS said. The US Geological Survey then lowered it to 7.8.

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It hit 68 kilometres east of the tourist town of Pokhara. Witnesses and media reports said the quake tremors lasted between 30 seconds and two minutes.

The quake’s epicentre was 50 miles north-west of Kathmandu and it had a depth of only seven miles, which is considered shallow in geological terms.

The shallower the quake, the more destructive power it carries, and witnesses said the trembling and swaying of the earth went on for several minutes.

National radio warned people to stay outdoors and maintain calm because more aftershocks were feared.

A 6.6-magnitude aftershock hit about an hour after the initial quake. But smaller aftershocks continued to arrive every few minutes and residents reported of the ground feeling unstable.

People gathered outside Kathmandu’s Norvic International Hospital where doctors and nurses had hooked up some patients to IV drops in the car park or were giving people oxygen.

A Swedish woman, Jenny Adhikari, who lives in Nepal, told the Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet that she was riding a bus in the town of Melamchi when the earth began to move.

‘A huge stone crashed only about 20 metres from the bus,’ she was quoted as saying.

‘All the houses around me have tumbled down. I think there are lot of people who have died,’ she told the newspaper by telephone. Melamchi is about 30 miles north-east of Kathmandu.

The earthquake also shook several cities across northern India and was felt as far away as Lahore in Pakistan and Lhasa in Tibet, 340 miles east of Kathmandu and India’s capital of New Delhi. The Indian cities of Lucknow in the north and Patna in the east also reported strong tremors.

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi called a meeting of top government officials to review the damage and disaster preparedness in parts of India that felt strong tremors.

‘We are in the process of finding more information and are working to reach out to those affected, both at home and in Nepal,’ he said in a tweet.

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The Indian states of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Sikkim, which share a border with Nepal, have reported building damage. There have also been reports of damage in the north-eastern state of Assam.

The earthquake was also felt across large areas of Bangladesh, triggering panic in the capital Dhaka as people rushed out onto the streets.

In the garment manufacturing hub of Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka, at least 50 workers were injured after the quake set off stampede in a garment factory, according to private Jamuna television.

Laxman Singh Rathore, director-general of the Indian Meteorological Department said: ‘The intensity was felt in entire north India. More intense shocks were felt in eastern UP (Uttar Pradesh) and Bihar, equally strong in sub-Himalayan West Bengal, Sikkim,’ he said.

Rathore that a second tremor of a 6.6 magnitude had been recorded around 20 minutes later and centred around the same region.

‘Since it is a big earthquake, there are aftershocks and people should stay cautious,’ he said.

‘The damage potential of any earthquake above seven magnitude is high. The duration of the earthquake tremors was different at different places. It was around 50-55 seconds long in Delhi.’

A 6.9-magnitude quake hit northeastern India in 2011, rocking neighbouring Nepal and killing 110 people.

Nepal suffered its worst recorded earthquake in 1934, which measured eight and all but destroyed the cities of Kathmandu, Bhaktapur and Patan.

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