One Muslim Terrorist Killed, Another Surrounded After Gun Battle With Police In Paris Suburb Of Saint-Denis

Woman In A Suicide Belt Is Killed By Police After Heavy Gunfire Breaks Out In Paris Suburb As Mastermind Of Friday’s Attacks Is Surrounded In Flat – Daily Mail

A female terror suspect wearing a suicide vest is believed to have blown herself up as police were involved in a gunfight with up to six other suspected Paris terrorists including the mastermind behind Friday’s massacres.

SWAT teams and special forces have surrounded an apartment in the Parisian suburb of Saint-Denis – close to the Stade de France – in a siege that started at 4.30am this morning.

French media are reporting the architect of the plan that killed 129 people, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, 27, is alive and inside the flat – until now it was thought he was in Syria orchestrating the attack from ISIS capital Raqqa.


A woman jihadi is said to have fired her AK-47 at police before blowing herself up as an assault squad stormed the apartment block. A rooftop sniper is believed to have shot dead another terror suspect through a window and another is reportedly dead.

Two people may been taken alive and arrested. An innocent person on the street may have been killed.

The chief suspect Salah Abdeslam, 26, who was last seen by police trying to enter Belgium in the hours after the attacks involving nine gunmen, may also be inside.

Machine gun fire and at least seven loud explosions, caused by the suicide bomber and possibly hand grenades, have been heard as the siege continues.

Police vans, fire trucks and three rushed to the scene in Saint-Denis, north of Paris. The site is a mile from the Stade de France stadium, which was targeted by three suicide bombers during Friday’s attacks.

Baptiste Marie, a 26-year-old journalist who lives near the scene of the stand-off, said: ‘It started with an explosion. Then there was second big explosion. Then two more explosions. There was an hour of gunfire’.

Riot police were clearing the streets early Wednesday, pointing guns at curious residents to move them off the roads.


Mr Marie said the officers seemed nervous – ‘you could see it in their eyes, ‘ he said.

Resident Amin Guizani, 21, said: ‘There were grenades. It was going, stopping. Kalashnikovs. Starting again’.

Residents have been told to stay in their homes and away from windows and some have been moved to a temporary shelter in the town hall. Police have confirmed that several officers have been hurt.


French media initially reported the raid is part of an ongoing operation to catch the ninth suspect involved in Friday night’s terror attacks in the French capital, who is thought to be on the run.

There are also unconfirmed reports of at least one fatality, although it is not clear if it is a terrorist or a police officer.

A police official says there have been exchanges of gunfire and special SWAT teams are on the scene, which has been blocked off by dozens of police cars and vans.

Ambulances can be seen and sirens heard in French television footage from the scene.


BFMTV and iTele both showed amateur video of the shootings and cited witnesses in the area saying they had heard sporadic gunfire since around 4.30am

The suburb of St Denis is where the Stade de France, one of the targets of Friday’s attacks, is located. On Friday three suicide bombers blew themselves up during a friendly football match.

French authorities have said they are searching for at least two people involved in last Friday’s attacks, which killed at least 129 people and seven terrorists.

In all at least 129 people died in Friday’s attacks, which have been claimed by the Islamist militant group ISIS. Seven militants died in the assault. Two are known to be on the run.


Unconfirmed reports suggest at three people have been taken into custody, although it appears the siege is ongoing.

The suburb’s mayor, Didier Paillard, said transport to St-Denis has been cancelled and schools in the suburb will not open today.



Obama Dreamer Who Raped And Killed 64-Year-Old Woman Had Been Arrested Four Times But Never Deported

Illegal Alien Who Raped And Killed 64-Yr Old California Woman Had Been Arrested But Not Deported Four Times – Right Scoop

While Dems and some Republicans continue to tell us there is no problem with illegal alien crime, there is more and more attention on the daily stories that Americans are suffering and dying because Obama won’t enforce the laws on the books.


Here’s another illegal alien crime horror:

A man who allegedly attacked a 64-year-old California woman and brutally raped her is an illegal alien from Mexico who has been arrested four times in the past two years.

The victim, Marilyn Pharis, died eight days after the attack, which occurred July 24 while she was asleep in her Santa Maria home. An autopsy is being conducted to help determine if Pharis died as a direct result of the heinous crime.

Victor Aureliano Martinez Ramirez, 29, was arrested shortly after the attack while he was inside another home nearby.

He is charged with attempted murder, first-degree burglary with person present, assault with intent to commit rape, sexual penetration by foreign object and resisting a peace officer, according to the Santa Maria Times. His bond is set at $1 million.

According to KEYT, Ramirez has been arrested four times over the past two years for narcotics violations. Santa Maria police chief Ralph Martin said Tuesday that Immigration and Customs Enforcement verified that he was in the U.S. illegally. The Santa Maria Times reports that his most recent arrest came in May 2014 and that he is still on probation stemming from that case.

It is unclear why Ramirez was still in the U.S. or whether he has been deported or has a removal order pending against him.

This is exactly why Trump is so popular – he’s one of the few, along with Ted Cruz, who actually dares to talk about this problem and wants to do something about it.



Massachusetts Grandmother Killed In Her Sleep By Obama Dreamers

Killed In Her Sleep: Illegal Immigrants Suspected In Mass. Grandma’s Death Faced Deportation – Fox News

A Massachusetts woman killed as she slept in her bed by a bullet fired through her ceiling would be alive today, if the men accused of shooting her had been deported, according to anti-illegal immigration activists.


Mirta Rivera, 41, a nurse and grandmother from Lawrence, was shot July 4 from an upstairs apartment where two illegal immigrants lived despite being under federal deportation orders, according to the Boston Herald. Dominican Republic nationals Wilton Lara-Calmona and Jose M. Lara-Mejia both had long histories of sneaking into the U.S.

The case, as well as a pending murder case in neighboring Connecticut involving an illegal immigrant accused in the stabbing death of a woman, comes after the July 1 murder of Kathryn Steinle in San Francisco helped propel illegal immigrant crime into a hot-button national issue.

“This has been happening all over the country for several years,” said Dan Cadman, a fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies and a retired federal immigration official. “I hope the American public is stirred up and angry about it.

“But I hope they realize there are so many more victims,” he added. “There are families all over the country that are grieving because they lost their mother, father, brother, sister, child or spouse needlessly.”

Lara-Calmona, 38, was deported in April 2012 and arrested for re-entering the country last November, the Herald reported. Lara-Mejia, 35, was nabbed crossing the border in August 2013 and ordered deported in April 2014, but apparently ignored the ruling.

The suspects and a third roommate, Christopher Paganmoux, were charged with trafficking heroin and cocaine after police investigating the shooting found drugs in their home. But the bullet hole in Lara-Mejia’s second-floor bedroom, which penetrated the ceiling above Rivera’s bed, and a Sears and Roebuck .270 bolt-action rifle that matched the bullet found in Rivera’s mattress, are expected to lead to murder charges.

In Norwich, Conn., Jean Jacques, 40, a Haitian illegal immigrant who got out of prison in January after serving 17 years for attempted murder, has been charged with stabbing Casey Chadwick, 25, to death and stuffing her in a closet last month. Jacques’ prison file was marked “Detainer: Immigration,” according to the Norwich Bulletin.

But the case seems to have sparked the same sort of finger-pointing between local, state and federal officials as was seen in the aftermath of the Steinle murder. In that case, ICE officials said they had requested that San Francisco hold Steinle’s alleged killer, Francisco Sanchez, until they could pick him up and evict him from the country. San Francisco refused, with its sheriff later saying it was only a “request,” and that he was not allowed to comply with it.

Connecticut officials say Jacques was released in January to the custody of the U.S. Department of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), but was never deported. While ICE spokesman Shawn Neudauer told the newspaper he was barred by law from discussing Jacques’ case, Connecticut last year became the first state to enact legislation that prohibited law enforcement agencies from holding people simply because federal authorities asked that they be held for deportation.

The measure was touted as a way to strengthen immigrant families and it does not extend to convicted felons such as Jacques or people with a “final order” of deportation.

Because local and state governments rarely pass comprehensive codes detailing their level of non-cooperation with the federal government on illegal immigration, and because the federal government itself has refused to enforce its own immigration laws, it is difficult to say where the blame lies, said one expert.

“We have two-tiered sanctuary policies,” said Bob Dane, spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR). “You have it at the local level, where cities refuse to cooperate, but you also have it at the national level. The Obama administration won’t enforce the laws federally, and the local communities won’t locally.

“You could make the case that America is now a sanctuary country,” Dane said.



*VIDEO* The Donald Holds Press Conference With Families Of Americans Killed By Illegal Aliens



7.8 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Nepal – Over 1,300 People Killed

More Than 1,300 People Dead In Monster Nepal Quake: Homes, Offices And Historic Buildings Flattened As 7.8 Earthquake Rocks Capital – Daily Mail

Britain has deployed a team of humanitarian experts to Nepal after a devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake ripped across the region, killing more than 1,300 people in four countries.

The eight-strong team will provide urgent humanitarian support for people affected by the disaster, International Development Secretary Justine Greening announced tonight.

Disaster response specialists, including experts in search and rescue, will travel to Nepal overnight where they will assess the scale of the damage caused by the quake, which destroyed homes, businesses and temples in the capital of Kathmandu.

The earthquake also triggered a massive avalanche on Mount Everest killing eight people and injuring at least 30 climbers. There are also a number of climbers still missing, including a number of Britons.






Another Briton feared missing is Laura Wood, 23, from Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. She is described by a friend as a ‘glowing lovely beautiful young girl often dressed in hippy type clothing’.

Miss Wood, who has a strong northern accent, has been trekking in the Himalayas without any means of making contact.

Officials today confirmed that at least 1,341 people have died as rescue teams continue to search for survivors who are feared to be trapped under rubble. The death toll is expected to rise.

Effects of the quake were felt hundreds of miles away in neighbouring countries with 36 killed in India, 12 in Tibet and 4 in Bangladesh. Two Chinese citizens died at the Nepal-China border.

Australian Ballantyne Forder, 20, who was working in a number of orphanages around the country, is also feared to be among those killed.

A spokeswoman for Intrepid Travel – which arranges treks in Nepal and around the Everest region – confirmed they had groups with British travellers in the area and said they are still attempting to contact those tours.

The earthquake has also triggered a massive avalanche on Mount Everest killing 18 and injuring at least 30. Several groups of climbers were also said to be trapped at base camp which was severely damaged.

Panicked residents had rushed into the streets as the tremor erupted with the impact felt hundreds of miles away in big swathes of northern India and even in Bangladesh.

Video footage showed people digging through the rubble of the bricks from the collapsed tower, looking for survivors.

Nepal’s capital Kathmandu – with a population of over one million – was one of the worst-hit areas in Nepal, with the quake’s epicentre just 50 miles north of the city. As the tremors intensified, people were seen in scenes of mayhem running from their homes and places of work in panic.

Dozens of people were gathered in the car park of Kathmandu’s Norvic International Hospital, where thin mattresses had been spread on the ground for patients rushed outside, some patients wearing hospital pyjamas, while doctors and nurses were treating people.

The United States Geological Survey said the quake struck 81 kilometres (50 miles) northwest of Kathmandu at 06.11 GMT, with walls crumbling and families racing outside of their homes. The 7.8 magnitude tremor was the worst to hit the poor South Asian nation in over 80 years.

Television footage showed a huge swathe of houses had collapsed in while roads had been split in two by the force of the impact.

India was first to respond to Nepal’s appeal for help by sending in military aircraft with medical equipment and relief teams.

Britain has deployed a team of humanitarian experts to Nepal to provide urgent support for people affected by the quake, International Development Secretary Justine Greening announced tonight.

Ms Greening said: ‘My thoughts are with the people of Nepal, in particular all those who have lost loved ones.

‘The absolute priority must be to reach people who are trapped and injured, and provide shelter and protection to those who have lost their homes.

‘Nepal needs our urgent humanitarian assistance. That is why we have rapidly deployed a team of humanitarian experts who will immediately begin work assessing the damage and helping the Nepalese authorities respond to this devastating earthquake.’

It came after Prime Minister David Cameron pledged that the UK would do all it can to help in the aftermath on the Nepal earthquake.

On Twitter he said: ‘Shocking news about the earthquake in Nepal – the UK will do all we can to help those caught up in it.’

Foreign Secretary, Philip Hammond, added his condolences and said the British Embassy was providing help to any UK nationals caught up in the disaster.

‘My thoughts are with the people of Nepal and everyone affected by the terrible loss of life and widespread damage caused by the earthquake,’ he said.

‘We are in close contact with the Nepalese government. The British Embassy in Nepal is offering our assistance to the authorities and is providing consular assistance to British Nationals.’






Labour leader Ed Miliband also expressed his sympathy for all those involved, tweeting: ‘The awful scenes in Nepal are heartbreaking. My thoughts go out to the people affected, and to those caring for survivors.’

Vim Tamang, a resident of Manglung village near the epicentre, said: ‘Our village has been almost wiped out. Most of the houses are either buried by landslide or damaged by shaking.’All the villagers have gathered in the open area. We don’t know what to do. We are feeling helpless.’

A terrified Kathmandu resident said: ‘Everything started shaking. Everything fell down. The walls around the main road have collapsed. The national stadiums gates have collapsed,’ Kathmandu resident Anupa Shrestha said.

Indian tourist Devyani Pant was in a Kathmandu coffee shop with friends when ‘suddenly the tables started trembling and paintings on the wall fell on the ground.

‘I screamed and rushed outside,’ she told Reuters by telephone from the capital, where at least 300 people died.

‘We are now collecting bodies and rushing the injured to the ambulance. We are being forced to pile several bodies one above the other to fit them in.’

Pushpa Das, a labourer, ran from the house when the first quake struck but could not escape a collapsing wall that injured his arm.

‘It was very scary. The earth was moving… I am waiting for treatment but the (hospital) staff is overwhelmed,’ he said.

‘The walls of houses have collapsed around me onto the road. All the families are outside in their yards huddled together. The tremors are still going on,’ an AFP reporter added.

Government emergency workers are reportedly already on the scene in the most damaged areas while Save the Children teams on the ground are coordinating an emergency response.

Oxfam is also lending its support to the rescue effort with teams in Nepal already assessing the humanitarian need and a team of technical experts preparing to fly from the UK with supplies to provide clean water, sanitation and emergency food supplies.

And Christian Aid has made an initial £50,000 available to help victims.

Tanya Barron, CEO of Plan International UK, who is in eastern Nepal on a scheduled visit, said she was on the top floor of a building when it started to ‘shake violently’.

She added: ‘It was very scary. Our colleagues advised us that the quake felt much stronger than usual.

‘We are safe and now we are working with our colleagues to respond. There are crowds of people on the streets here and the hospitals are already overwhelmed. Our immediate priorities are to assist the emergency services with search and rescue and to establish shelter.’

A spokeswoman for Intrepid Travel, which arranges treks in Nepal and around the Everest region, said Britons were among their passengers in the area, but would not confirm how many.

Chloe Berman said: ‘We are currently working with our local operations team to contact our groups in the area, and confirm that all passengers, leaders and local ground staff are safe and accounted for.

‘Communications in the region is currently limited. There has been significant damage to infrastructure. Most phone lines are down and mobile coverage is limited.’

Several buildings collapsed in the centre of the capital, the ancient Old Kathmandu, including centuries-old temples and towers, said resident Prachanda Sual.












Among them was the Dharahara Tower, one of the city’s landmarks built by Nepal’s royal rulers in the 1800s and a Unesco-recognised historical monument.

There were reports of that a body was removed from the tower and a second lay further up the road after it was reduced to rubble. Teams have rescued many more from the ruins. It was not immediately clear how many people were in the multi-storey tower when it collapsed.

‘Our focus is on rescue in the core areas of Kathmandu where the population is concentrated,’ Dinesh Acharya, metropolitan police spokesman, said.

‘Many houses and buildings have collapsed. We don’t know if there have been fatalities yet.’

Old Kathmandu city is a warren of tightly-packed, narrow lanes with poorly-constructed homes piled on top of each other which were vulnerable to collapse.

Residents reported seeing trails of destruction – collapsed walls, broken windows and fallen telephone poles – as they drove through the capital, along with streets filled with terrified people.

‘It’s too early to make any assessment but the damage isn’t as bad as it could have been,’ said Liz Satow, the Nepal director for the air group World Vision who drove from Kathmandu to the nearby town of Lalitpur and added that while there was considerable damage, most buildings were still intact.

A state broadcaster for China that said at least two Chinese tourists had also died at the Nepal-China border.

The powerful earthquake also created an avalanche which swept the face of Mt. Everest killing eight and injuring at least 30 climbers attempting the world’s highest peak – with April the most popular month to attempt the summit

It struck between the Khumbu Icefall, a rugged area of collapsed ice and snow, and the base camp, said Ang Tshering of the Nepal Mountaineering Association.

The disaster has sparked fears for climbers on the world’s highest peak a year after another avalanche caused the deadliest incident on the mountain.

Carsten Lillelund Pedersen, a Dane who is climbing the Everest with a Belgian climber Jelle Veyt, said on his Facebook page that they were at Khumbu Icefall at altitude 16,500ft when the earthquake hit.

He wrote on Facebook that they have started to receive the injured, including one person with the most severe injuries who sustained many fractures.

Romanian climber Alex Gavan said on Twitter that there had been a ‘huge avalanche’ and ‘many, many’ people were up on the mountain.








‘Running for life from my tent,’ Gavan said. ‘Everest base camp huge earthquake then huge avalanche.’

Another climber, Daniel Mazur, said Everest base camp had been ‘severely damaged’ and his team was trapped.

‘Please pray for everyone,’ he said on his Twitter page.

An avalanche in April 2014 just above the base camp on Mount Everest killed 16 Nepali guides. April is one of the most popular times to climb Everest before rain and clouds cloak the mountain at the end of next month.

Some 230,000 people – nearly half of Nepal’s yearly foreign visitors – come to trek the Himalayas, with 810 attempting to scale Mt. Everest in 2013.

Initially measured at 7.5 magnitude, the quake was later adjusted to 7.9, with a depth of 15 kilometres, the USGS said. The US Geological Survey then lowered it to 7.8.






It hit 68 kilometres east of the tourist town of Pokhara. Witnesses and media reports said the quake tremors lasted between 30 seconds and two minutes.

The quake’s epicentre was 50 miles north-west of Kathmandu and it had a depth of only seven miles, which is considered shallow in geological terms.

The shallower the quake, the more destructive power it carries, and witnesses said the trembling and swaying of the earth went on for several minutes.

National radio warned people to stay outdoors and maintain calm because more aftershocks were feared.

A 6.6-magnitude aftershock hit about an hour after the initial quake. But smaller aftershocks continued to arrive every few minutes and residents reported of the ground feeling unstable.

People gathered outside Kathmandu’s Norvic International Hospital where doctors and nurses had hooked up some patients to IV drops in the car park or were giving people oxygen.

A Swedish woman, Jenny Adhikari, who lives in Nepal, told the Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet that she was riding a bus in the town of Melamchi when the earth began to move.

‘A huge stone crashed only about 20 metres from the bus,’ she was quoted as saying.

‘All the houses around me have tumbled down. I think there are lot of people who have died,’ she told the newspaper by telephone. Melamchi is about 30 miles north-east of Kathmandu.

The earthquake also shook several cities across northern India and was felt as far away as Lahore in Pakistan and Lhasa in Tibet, 340 miles east of Kathmandu and India’s capital of New Delhi. The Indian cities of Lucknow in the north and Patna in the east also reported strong tremors.

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi called a meeting of top government officials to review the damage and disaster preparedness in parts of India that felt strong tremors.

‘We are in the process of finding more information and are working to reach out to those affected, both at home and in Nepal,’ he said in a tweet.







The Indian states of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Sikkim, which share a border with Nepal, have reported building damage. There have also been reports of damage in the north-eastern state of Assam.

The earthquake was also felt across large areas of Bangladesh, triggering panic in the capital Dhaka as people rushed out onto the streets.

In the garment manufacturing hub of Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka, at least 50 workers were injured after the quake set off stampede in a garment factory, according to private Jamuna television.

Laxman Singh Rathore, director-general of the Indian Meteorological Department said: ‘The intensity was felt in entire north India. More intense shocks were felt in eastern UP (Uttar Pradesh) and Bihar, equally strong in sub-Himalayan West Bengal, Sikkim,’ he said.

Rathore that a second tremor of a 6.6 magnitude had been recorded around 20 minutes later and centred around the same region.

‘Since it is a big earthquake, there are aftershocks and people should stay cautious,’ he said.

‘The damage potential of any earthquake above seven magnitude is high. The duration of the earthquake tremors was different at different places. It was around 50-55 seconds long in Delhi.’

A 6.9-magnitude quake hit northeastern India in 2011, rocking neighbouring Nepal and killing 110 people.

Nepal suffered its worst recorded earthquake in 1934, which measured eight and all but destroyed the cities of Kathmandu, Bhaktapur and Patan.







*VIDEO* Navy SEAL Who Killed Osama Bin Laden Explains Why Obama Regime Lackey Marie Harf Is A Babbling Imbecile



Masked Ex-Cop Killed While Trying To Set Fire To Anti-Corruption Blogger’s Hot Dog Cart

Arkansas Ex-Cop Killed While Trying To Set Anti-Corruption Blogger’s Hot Dog Cart On Fire – Bizarre World News

A former police officer died while trying to set ablaze a food cart belonging to a blogger who exposed crooked cops and other corrupt city officials. reported Friday that former Little Rock Police Officer Todd Payne died when blogger Ean Bordeaux (pictured above) tackled him as Payne tried to flee the scene of the attempted arson.


Bordeaux is the proprietor of the Corruption Sucks blog, a webpage dedicated to exposing corruption in the Little Rock local government and in the state government of Arkansas. At about 4:30 a.m. on Friday, he awoke to find the hot dog cart he operates for a living in flames.

“I looked outside and my hot dog cart’s on fire,” he told KARK. The cart operated on propane tanks, which, Bordeaux said, “could have blown up the house.”

He called 911, then ran outside in a bathrobe to put out the blaze. That was when he noticed a heavyset man in a mask running away.

Bordeaux was too busy trying to put out the flames then, he said, but about 15 minutes later, the man in the mask came back. The blogger watched from inside his house as the masked man tried to restart the fire.

Running outside again, Bordeaux said, he tackled the man as he tried to flee, hoping to hold him until police arrived.

Payne hit the pavement face-first, however, and died from his injuries. Bordeaux said his only desire had been to immobilize the perpetrator and hand him over to authorities.

He quickly realized, however, that the dead man was former LRPD officer Todd “Creepy Todd” Payne, who was fired from the force in 2010 for multiple violations, including a DUI crash in which Payne attempted to leave the scene, incidences of witness intimidation, lying to superiors and dereliction of duty.

Bordeaux had written extensively about Payne at Corruption Sucks, and believes that the former cop was attempting to strike back at him for exposing his crimes.

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Racist Eugenicists Update: More Black Babies Killed By Abortion In New York Than Born

NYC: More Black Babies Killed By Abortion Than Born – CNS

In 2012, there were more black babies killed by abortion (31,328) in New York City than were born there (24,758), and the black children killed comprised 42.4% of the total number of abortions in the Big Apple, according to a report by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.


The report is entitled, Summary of Vital Statistics 2012 The City of New York, Pregnancy Outcomes, and was prepared by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Vital Statistics. (See Pregnancy Outcomes NYC Health 2012.pdf)

Table 1 of the report presents the total number of live births, spontaneous terminations (miscarriages), and induced terminations (abortions) for women in different age brackets between 15 and 49 years of age. The table also breaks that data down by race – Hispanic, Asian and Pacific Islander, Non-Hispanic White, Non-Hispanic Black – and also by borough of residence: Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island.

The numbers show that in 2012, there were 31,328 induced terminations (abortions) among non-Hispanic black women in New York City. That same year, there were 24,758 live births for non-Hispanic black women in New York City. There were 6,570 more abortions than live births of black children.

In total, there were 73,815 abortions, which means the 31,328 black babies aborted comprised 42.4% of the total abortions.

For Hispanic women, there were 22,917 abortions in New York City in 2012, which is 31% of the total abortions.

Black and Hispanic abortions combined, 54,245 babies, is 73% of the total abortions in the Big Apple in 2012.

The number of non-Hispanic white abortions was 9,704, and the number of Asian and Pacific Islander abortions was 4,493.

The total number of live births in New York City in 2012 for women ages 15-49 was 123,231. That is a rate of 14.8 live births per 1,000 women, which is the lowest rate since 1979, according to the report. In addition, the live birth rate (per 1,000 women) has declined 3.9% since 2003, when it was a 15.4 rate, states the report. (See Pregnancy Outcomes NYC Health 2012.pdf)

In addition, while there were 73,815 abortions in New York City in 2012, the rate of abortions per 1,000 women is down 8.6% since 2011, according to the report.

Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have not published their abortion statistics for 2011 or 2012 yet, they do have data for 2010. (See Table 12.) In the CDC’s numbers, there were 38,574 black babies killed by abortion in New York City in 2010; Hispanic babies aborted, 27,112; white babies killed by abortion, 9,220; and “other” aborted, 5,368. The total abortions in New York City in 2010 “reported by known race/ethnicity” were 80,274, according to the CDC.

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Top Obama Afghan Officials Can’t Say How Many Americans Have Been Killed In Afghanistan This Year

Top Obama Afghan Officials Asked How Many Americans Have Been Killed This Year In Afghanistan… Not A Single One Can Answer The Question – Weasel Zippers

Nor could they say how much the U.S. is spending in Afghanistan, even far-left Congressman Gerry Connolly called their inability to answer these questions “stunning.”


Via WSJ:

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R., Calif.) had a simple question Wednesday for three of the Obama administration’s top Afghanistan specialists: How many American troops have been killed in Afghanistan this year?

None of the witnesses at the House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on Afghanistan had an answer.

How much is the U.S. spending in Afghanistan? Mr. Rohrabacher asked.

No one could say.

“We’re supposed to believe that you fellas have a plan that’s going to end up in a positive way in Afghanistan?” Mr. Rohrabacher asked. “Holy cow!”

Mr. Rohrabacher’s incredulous questioning came during a two-hour hearing on U.S. policy in Afghanistan that revealed increasing congressional frustration with U.S. policy as the administration tries to rescue its plan to keep thousands of troops in Afghanistan through the end of this decade, if not beyond.

Rep. Gerry Connolly (D., Va.) called the witnesses’ inability to rattle off the facts “a stunning development.”

“How can you come to a congressional oversight hearing on this subject and not know” the answers? He asked. “Like that wouldn’t be a question the tip of one’s tongue.”

Keep reading

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Typhoon Haiyan Feared To Have Killed 10,000 Filipinos; Vietnam And China Prepare For The Worst (Pictures/Video)

Typhoon Haiyan Feared To Have Killed Ten Thousand Filipinos As Vietnam And China Now Prepare For The Worst – Daily Mail

The death toll from one of the most powerful storms on record could reach 10,000 according to officials.

So far Typhoon Haiyan is said to have killed 1,200 people in the Philippines and left many more injured, but the figure could rise dramatically after the full devastation of the ferocious storm was realised.

According to the Red Cross, 1,000 have been left dead in the devastated city of Tacloban on the island of Leyte with a further 200 casualties in Samar Province.

Regional police chief Elmer Soria said he was briefed by Leyte provincial Govenor Dominic Petilla late last night and told there were about 10,000 deaths on the island, mostly by drowning and from collapsed buildings.

About four million people are believed to have been affected by the category five storm, according to the country’s national disaster agency. This figure includes 800,000 who had to be evacuated before the storm struck.



Winds of up to 235mph and gusts of 170mph left a trail of destruction – triggering major landslides, knocking out power and communications and causing catastrophic widespread damage. Hundreds of homes have been flattened and scores of streets flooded.

The storm is now moving towards mainland Asian and is expected to reach Vietnam coastal areas on Sunday morning while humanitarian experts estimate the number of casualties will rise considerably.

Weather forecasts have also predicted more bad weather could be on the way to the Philippines at the beginning of next week, with high winds expected to arrive on Monday.

The Foreign Office in the Philippines’ capital Manila has had no reports of British casualties but it is feared thousands have been left stranded as a result.

About 15,000 British nationals are said to live on the islands and every year 65,000 visit tourist hotspots like northern Cebu Province and Boracay Island, both of which have been savaged by the storm.

Vietnamese authorities have begun evacuating 100,000 people as they prepare to face the full force of the ferocious weather. ‘The evacuation is being conducted with urgency,’ disaster official Nguyen Thi Yen Linh said from central Danang City, where some 76,000 were being moved to safety.

Around 300,000 others have been taken to shelters in the provinces of Quang Ngai, Quang Nam and Thua Thien Hue. Schools were closed and two deputy prime ministers were sent to the region to direct preparations.

The army has been brought in to provide emergency relief with some 170,000 soldiers assisting people after the typhoon hits.

Haiyan is likely to be a category two or three storm when it hits the Vietnamese coast, but the Red Cross has warned some 6.5 million people in in the country could be affected.

It is expected to reach Da Nang province tomorrow morning before moving up the country’s west coast and eventually making its way to the capital, Hanoi.




Weather experts predict the country will experience sea surges, strong winds and up to two feet of rain, triggering massive floods.

Chinese authorities have also issued a level three emergency response throughout the country, ordering fisherman to shelter their boats to prevent any damage.

It will be the 30th typhoon to hit China this year with the central and southern parts of Hainan and Sansha city expected to be hit by downpours in the next 24 hours.

Officials in neighbouring Laos and Cambodia are also taking precautions in an attempt to soften the impact of the ferocious storm.

Humanitarian experts say they expect the number of casualties to be ‘massive’. A Red Cross spokesman said: ‘We now fear that thousands will have lost their lives.’

The UK has sent a team of three experts to the country today to assess the extent of the damage, after which the Government will decide upon its response, a spokesman for the Department for International Development (Dfid) said.

International Development Secretary Justine Greening has also pledged £6 million worth of emergency aid.

She said: ‘My thoughts are with the people of the Philippines, in particular those who have lost loved ones. UK support is now under way.

‘Many thousands of people in remote, hard-to-reach communities have lost their homes and everything they own. They are living in the open and completely exposed to the elements.

‘The absolute priority must be to reach them with shelter and protection as soon as possible.

‘UK support will provide urgently needed access to clean water, shelter, household items and blankets,

‘We are also sending additional humanitarian experts from the UK to work with the DfID team and international agencies, including ensuring partners are prioritising the protection of vulnerable girls and women.’

The category-5 super typhoon Haiyan – Chinese for ‘sea bird’ – smashed into the eastern islands of the Philippines with winds nearly 150mph stronger than the St Jude storm which struck the UK in late October.

Roofs were ripped from houses, ferocious 20ft waves washed away coastal villages, power lines came down and trees were uprooted.



Capt. John Andrews, deputy director general of the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines, said he had received ‘reliable information’ by radio that more than 100 bodies were lying in the streets of Tacloban on hardest-hit Leyte Island.

Regional military commander Lt. Gen. Roy Deveraturda said that the casualty figure ‘probably will increase’ after viewing aerial photographs of the widespread devastation caused by the typhoon.

Cabinet Secretary Rene Almendras, a senior aide to President Benigno Aquino III, said that the number of casualties could not be immediately determined, but that the figure was ‘probably in that range’ given by Andrews. Government troops were helping recover bodies, he said.

Interior Secretary Mar Roxas said it was too early to know how many people had died in the storm.

In the aftermath, Filipinos have taken to social media in an attempt to find missing loved ones by posting photos on Twitter.



In Tacloban, a city of more than 200,000 believed to be one of the worst hit cities, corrugated iron sheets were ripped from roofs before crashing into buildings, according to video footage taken by a resident.

Flash floods also turned Tacloban’s streets into rivers, while a pictures from an ABS-CBN television reporter showed six bamboo houses washed away along a beach more than 200 kilometres to the south.

Civil aviation authorities in Tacloban, about 360 miles southeast of Manila, reported the seaside airport terminal was ‘ruined’ by storm surges.

U.S. Marine Col. Mike Wylie, who surveyed the damage in Tacloban prior to possible American assistance, said that the damage to the runway was significant. However, military planes were still able to land with relief aid.



Vice mayor Jim Pe of Coron town on Busuanga, the last island battered by the typhoon before it blew away to the South China Sea, said most of the houses and buildings there had been destroyed or damaged.

Five people drowned in the storm surge and three others are missing. He said: ‘It was like a 747 flying just above my roof.’ adding that his family and some of his neighbours whose houses were destroyed took shelter in his basement.

ABS-CBN also showed fierce winds whipping buildings and vehicles as storm surges swamped Tacloban with debris-laden floodwaters.

In the aftermath, people were seen weeping while retrieving bodies of loved ones inside buildings and on a street that was littered with fallen trees, roofing material and other building parts torn off in the typhoon’s fury.

All that was left of one large building whose walls were smashed in were the skeletal remains of its rafters.

ABS-CBN television anchor Ted Failon, who was able to report only briefly Friday from Tacloban, said the storm surge was ‘like the tsunami in Japan’.

‘The sea engulfed Tacloban,’ he said, explaining that a major part of the city is surrounded on three sides by the waters between Leyte and Samar islands.



Before he left Tacloban today, Failon said he saw people like a ‘pack of rats’ looting a department store taking whatever they could lay their hands on including refrigerators and TV sets. TV footage showed a group of men smiling as they walked away with a large ice cream freezer and other goods.

Relief workers today said they are having difficulties delivering food and other supplies, with roads blocked by landslides and fallen trees.

The Philippines is made up of more than 7,000 islands, so delivering aid can take up to two or tree days.

Red Cross chief Gwendolyn Pang said they struggled to deliver aid in the adverse conditions.

She said: ‘We’ve had reports of uprooted trees, very strong winds and houses made of light materials being damaged

‘We have put rescue teams and equipment at different places, but at the moment we can’t really do much because of the heavy rain and strong winds. There is no power’.

Mrs Pang added the death toll, which is said to have exceeded 1,000, was just an ‘estimate’.

Interior Secretary Mar Roxas said the enormous rescue operation was still ongoing.

He added: ‘We expect a very high number of fatalities as well as injured. All systems, all vestiges of modern living – communications, power, water – all are down. Media is down, so there is no way to communicate with the people in a mass sort of way.’

Ben Webster, disaster response manager for the Red Cross, added: ‘Preparedness is strengthening over the years as agencies become more proficient at preparing for disasters, technology is improving so we can forecast a bit more reliably, so it is getting better in terms of preparation.

‘But there are still hundreds of thousands of families likely to have been impacted, and even if the loss of life isn’t as high as it usually is, these are still people who need homes and livelihoods which will have been impacted by this huge storm.



‘The British Red Cross launched an appeal yesterday which the public can support. We have already released £100,000 yesterday which will support relief items, 10,000 tarpaulins were sent from Kuala Lumpur, and 2,000 hygiene parcels as well.

‘The whole international Red Cross movement will be mobilising to support the Philippines Red Cross and the International Federation in country to be able to respond to the situation.’

Marie Madamba-Nunez of Oxfam, which has already dispatched aid to the Philippines, said: ‘Making sure people have clean water, safe sanitation and a roof over peoples heads will be an immediate priority.

‘These disasters compound the burden of Philippines’ poorest people. Small scale farmers and those relying on fishing to make a living will be hardest hit. Their fields and their boats and tackle will be badly damaged and they will need help not only today but in months to come.

‘Economic solutions to root out poverty and inequality must be paired with minimising the risk of poor communities to the vagaries of weather and climate change.’



Save the Children said up to 7,000 schools could have been damaged by Haiyan, as the aid agency battles to reach the hardest hit areas.

The charity’s country director Anna Lindenfors said: ‘We are very concerned for the poorest and most vulnerable children in some of the hardest hit places like Tacloban where there is likely to be catastrophic damage, especially to the homes of the poorest people who live in buildings made from flimsy materials.’

‘While the immediate focus must be on saving lives, we are also extremely worried that thousands of schools will have been knocked out of action or badly affected by the typhoon.

‘In the worst hit areas this will have a terrible impact on children’s education and it will be important that we help them back to school as quickly as possible.’

Speaking in the aftermath of the storm Paul Knightley, forecast manager at MeteoGroup, described Haiyan as ‘one of the strongest typhoons ever seen before on the planet in the modern age’.



‘It is an incredibly powerful storm, which has now moved through the Philippines. No doubt we will see all sorts of damage has been caused.

‘As far as tropical storms go, this is about the top of the ladder. To get winds approaching 200mph as an average wind speed within the storm – you’re talking the top few percent of all storms that have ever occurred.

‘It may be one of the – if not the – strongest land-falling storm we’ve seen for many years, possibly in recorded history.’

The storm brought further misery to thousands of residents of Bohol who had been camped in tents and other makeshift shelters after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck the island last month.

At least 5,000 survivors were still living in tents on the island, and they were moved to schools that had been turned into evacuation centres.



Speaking yesterday, Roger Mercado, governor of Southern Leyte, an island off the coast off the popular tourist region of Cebu, told how dense clouds and heavy rains turned day into night.

‘When you’re faced with such a scenario, you can only pray and pray and pray,’ he said, as weather forecasters warned of ‘catastrophic’ damage.

The governor added: ‘My worst fear is that there will be many massive loss of lives and property.’

In preparation for the typhoon, officials in Cebu province shut down electric services to the northern part of the province to avoid electrocutions in case power pylons are toppled, said assistant regional civil defence chief Flor Gaviola.



President Benigno Aquino assured the public of war-like preparations, with three C-130 air force cargo planes and 32 military helicopters and planes on standby, along with 20 navy ships.

Authorities halted ferry services and fishing operations, while nearly 200 local flights had been suspended. Commuter bus services were also stopped as the storm dumped torrential rain and ripped iron roofs off buildings and houses.

Schools, offices and shops in the central Philippines were closed, with hospitals, soldiers and emergency workers on standby for rescue operations.

‘We can hear the winds howling but the rains are not too strong. We have encountered several distress calls regarding fallen trees and power lines cut. We don’t have power now,’ Samar Vice Governor Stephen James Tan said in a radio interview yesterday.

An average of 20 major storms or typhoons, many of them deadly, hit the Philippines each year.



The developing country is particularly vulnerable because it is often the first major landmass for the storms after they build over the Pacific Ocean.

The Philippine government and some scientists have said climate change may be increasing the ferocity and frequency of storms.

Others say Pacific waters were an important reason for the strength of Haiyan, but added it was premature to blame climate change based on the scanty historical data available.

The poverty-stricken country has already endured a year of earthquakes and floods, with no fewer than 24 disastrous weather events.

The Philippines suffered the world’s strongest storm of 2012, when Typhoon Bopha left about 2,000 people dead or missing on the southern island of Mindanao.



The Philippines has known disaster at the hands of mother nature as recently as 2011 when typhoon Washi killed 1,200 people, displaced 300,000 and destroyed more than 10,000 homes.

In September, category-five typhoon Usagi, with winds gusting of up to 149 mph, battered the northern island of Batanes before causing damage in southern China.

Bopha last year flattened three coastal towns on the southern island of Mindanao, killing 1,100 people and wreaking damage estimated at $1.04 billion.

Cambodian authorities said they were closely watching the development of the world’s biggest storm to materialise.

Storm trackers have predicted the storm could reach China on Tuesday, but the wind speeds will have dropped to between 25 and 35mph.

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Nineteen Firefighters Killed In Arizona Wildfire (Video)

Out-Of-Control Arizona Wildfire Kills 19 Firefighters, Including Nearly All Of Elite Hotshot Crew – Fox News

Eighteen members of an elite Hotshots firefighting crew and one other person who were killed Sunday in an Arizona wildfire tried to protect themselves by deploying tent-like structures before they were overtaken, a state forestry spokesman says.


The lightning-sparked fire, which spread to more than 8,000 acres amid triple-digit temperatures, destroyed at least 50 structures and threatened 500 people in Yarnell, a town of about 700 residents that sits 85 miles northwest of Phoenix, the Yavapai County Emergency Management said Monday. Most people had evacuated from the town, and no injuries or other deaths were reported.

The fire killed 18 members of the 20-member of the Prescott Granite Mountain Hotshots crew, which were known for battling the region’s worst fires, including two earlier this season. The average age of the men in the crew was 22-years-old, Fox 10 reports. The other person killed has not yet been identified, Reichling said.

Nineteen fire shelters were deployed on Sunday, and some of the firefighters were found inside them, while others were outside the shelters, Mike Reichling, Arizona State Forestry Division spokesman, told the Arizona Republic.

A helicopter pilot discovered the bodies and authorities are working to remove them, a Department of Public Safety spokesperson said, according to Fox 10.

It was the most firefighters killed battling a wildfire in the U.S. in decades.

Prescott Fire Chief Dan Fraijo said the firefighters, whose names have not been released, were part of the city’s fire department.

“We’re devastated,” Fraijo said late Sunday. “We just lost 19 of the finest people you’ll ever meet.”

Prescott firefighter and spokesman Wade Ward told the Prescott Daily Courier in an interview last week that the hotshots crews are highly trained individuals who work long hours in extreme conditions. The crews, which number roughly 100 in the U.S., often hike for miles into the wilderness with chainsaws and backpacks stuffed with heavy gear to build lines of protection between people and raging fires.

State forestry spokesman Art Morrison told the Associated Press that the firefighters were forced to deploy their emergency fire shelters – tent-like structures meant to shield firefighters from flames and heat – when they were caught in the Yarnell-area fire on Sunday.

The Cronkite News Service had featured the group in a story practicing such deployment in a worst-case scenario drill. The crew last year had four rookies on its team, according to the story.

“One of the last fail-safe methods that a firefighter can do under those conditions is literally to dig as much as they can down and cover themselves with a protective — kinda looks like a foil type – fire-resistant material – with the desire, the hope at least, is that the fire will burn over the top of them and they can survive it,” Fraijo said Sunday.

“Under certain conditions there’s usually only sometimes a 50 percent chance that they survive,” he said. “It’s an extreme measure that’s taken under the absolute worst conditions.”

Two hundred firefighters were working on the Yarnell fire Sunday, and several hundred more were expected to arrive Monday. The fire has also forced the closure of parts of state Route 89. It was zero percent contained late Sunday.

Reichling said Monday that 18 hotshot fire crews are now battling the blaze.

The National Weather Service also said there’s a 30 percent of thunderstorms and showers Monday in the Yarnell area. Rain could help slow the fire, but the forecast also says the storms could produce gusty winds.


Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer plans to travel to the area on Monday.

“This is as dark a day as I can remember,” Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer said in a statement on Sunday. “It may be days or longer before an investigation reveals how this tragedy occurred, but the essence we already know in our hearts: fighting fires is dangerous work. The risk is well-known to the brave men and women who don their gear and do battle against forest and flame.

“When a tragedy like this strikes, all we can do is offer our eternal gratitude to the fallen, and prayers for the families and friends left behind. God bless them all.”

President Obama, currently traveling in Africa, released a statement praising the firefighters as “heroes – highly-skilled professionals who, like so many across our country do every day, selflessly put themselves in harm’s way to protect the lives and property of fellow citizens they would never meet.”

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said the “devastating” loss is a reminder of deadly risks firefighters take every day.

“Their sacrifice will never be forgotten,” McCain said in a statement.

The National Fire Protection Association website lists the last wildland fire to kill more firefighters as the 1933 Griffith Park fire of Los Angeles, which killed 29. The most firefighters – 340 – were killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York, according to the website.

In another Arizona fire, a 2-acre blaze that started at a motorcycle salvage yard and spread to a trailer park has destroyed five mobile homes in the Gila County community of Rye, located more than 130 miles east of Yarnell.

Gila County Health and Emergency Services Director Michael O’Driscoll said no one was injured in Rye.

The fire was ignited Saturday night at All Bikes Sales located off Highway 87. It spread to neighboring federal Forest Service land but was fully contained within 12 hours of its start.

The Red Cross says seven adults and two children were staying at a shelter set up for people who were evacuated.

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Your Daley Gator Feel-Good Story O’ The Day

Jihadi Work Accident: Five Pakistani Taliban Fighters Killed When IED Detonates During Construction – Weasel Zippers

Feel good story of the day.

ORAKZAI AGENCY – An explosion January 23 killed at least five suspected Taliban members and wounded three others in Jandri Kallay, Orakzai Agency, Pakistan, Dawn News reported.

The victims were making an improvised explosive device (IED), political authorities told media.

The use of IEDs recently has backfired on militants, causing analysts to suspect that their level of training and the quality of their IEDs are falling off.

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Another Attack: U.S. Embassy Security Official Killed In Yemen

Another Attack: U.S. Embassy Security Official Killed In Yemen – Big Peace

Masked gunmen have attacked and killed a security official at the U.S. embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, Reuters reported early this morning. The official, Qassem Aqlan, was a Yemeni who led a security team at the U.S. diplomatic mission. He was attacked in his car by assassins on a motorcycle in the city center.

The attack came just hours after Americans began to learn the full extent of security failures at U.S. diplomatic missions in Libya prior to the deadly terrorist attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi last month.

Officials on the ground had asked the State Department for increased security, but their requests were denied or ignored by a bureaucracy that still insists it had the correct number of “assets” in place. Meanwhile, President Barack Obama, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and UN Ambassador Susan Rice all claimed the attacks had been the result of outrage at an anti-Islam video–not premeditated terror attacks against weak defenses.

Today’s attack on the U.S. security official – likely the work of Al Qaeda, which is battling U.S. drone strikes and counter-terror operations in Yemen – has not been accompanied by similar rationalizations, but underlines the fact that terrorists are planning and carrying out attacks against U.S. diplomatic targets. Al Qaeda pursued a similar strategy in the late 1990s, before the U.S. shifted its strategy away from a law enforcement approach. Both the Bush and the Obama administrations have carried out drone strikes in Yemen against Al Qaeda.

The new attack is a reminder that there is more to the wave of anti-American attacks than an Internet video, and that the U.S. still faces a determined enemy in Al Qaeda despite the killing of Osama bin Laden last May.

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Your Daley Gator Feel-Good News Story O’ The Day

Eight Pakistani Taliban Including Top Commanders Killed When Bomb Explodes During Construction – Weasel Zippers


Bara Akakhel: Eight militants including an important commander died on Saturday whilst making a bomb in the area of Bara Akakhel, Khyber agency, Dawn News reported.

According to the security sources, militants were engaged in making the bomb when the IED exploded. The explosiong killed eight people including important commanders Nazir ahmed, Abdul Malik, Haji Toor.

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