Mexican Authorities: ISIS Has Camp A Few Miles From Texas Border

ISIS Camp A Few Miles From Texas, Mexican Authorities Confirm – Judicial Watch

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ISIS is operating a camp just a few miles from El Paso, Texas, according to Judicial Watch sources that include a Mexican Army field grade officer and a Mexican Federal Police Inspector.

The exact location where the terrorist group has established its base is around eight miles from the U.S. border in an area known as “Anapra” situated just west of Ciudad Juárez in the Mexican state of Chihuahua. Another ISIS cell to the west of Ciudad Juárez, in Puerto Palomas, targets the New Mexico towns of Columbus and Deming for easy access to the United States, the same knowledgeable sources confirm.

During the course of a joint operation last week, Mexican Army and federal law enforcement officials discovered documents in Arabic and Urdu, as well as “plans” of Fort Bliss – the sprawling military installation that houses the US Army’s 1st Armored Division. Muslim prayer rugs were recovered with the documents during the operation.

Law enforcement and intelligence sources report the area around Anapra is dominated by the Vicente Carrillo Fuentes Cartel (“Juárez Cartel”), La Línea (the enforcement arm of the cartel) and the Barrio Azteca (a gang originally formed in the jails of El Paso). Cartel control of the Anapra area make it an extremely dangerous and hostile operating environment for Mexican Army and Federal Police operations.

According to these same sources, “coyotes” engaged in human smuggling – and working for Juárez Cartel – help move ISIS terrorists through the desert and across the border between Santa Teresa and Sunland Park, New Mexico. To the east of El Paso and Ciudad Juárez, cartel-backed “coyotes” are also smuggling ISIS terrorists through the porous border between Acala and Fort Hancock, Texas. These specific areas were targeted for exploitation by ISIS because of their understaffed municipal and county police forces, and the relative safe-havens the areas provide for the unchecked large-scale drug smuggling that was already ongoing.

Mexican intelligence sources report that ISIS intends to exploit the railways and airport facilities in the vicinity of Santa Teresa, NM (a US port-of-entry). The sources also say that ISIS has “spotters” located in the East Potrillo Mountains of New Mexico (largely managed by the Bureau of Land Management) to assist with terrorist border crossing operations. ISIS is conducting reconnaissance of regional universities; the White Sands Missile Range; government facilities in Alamogordo, NM; Ft. Bliss; and the electrical power facilities near Anapra and Chaparral, NM.

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Texas City Replaces Police Department With Private Security Force – Crime Rate Pummets

Texas City Gets Rid Of Police Dept., Hires ‘SEAL Security’ – The Blaze

In 2012, the city of Sharpstown, Texas, made the controversial decision not to renew its contract with the local police department and instead hire a private security firm to combat crime.

Since SEAL Security Solutions took over law enforcement in Sharpstown, crime has reportedly dropped by 61 percent in just 20 months.

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James Alexander, director of operations for SEAL Security Solutions said, “Since we’ve been in there, an independent crime study that they’ve had done [indicates] we’ve reduced the crime by 61 percent,” according to Guns.com.

In addition to the apparent increase in efficiency, the private firm is reportedly saving taxpayers roughly $200,000 each year – even though the community is getting more patrol officers than before.

“On a constable patrol contract, it’s either a 70/30 or an 80/20. Meaning they say they patrol your community 70 percent of the time, [while] 30 percent of the time they use for running calls out of your area or writing reports,” Alexander said.

He continued: “The second thing that drastically reduces the crime is that we do directed patrols, meaning we don’t just put an officer out there and say ‘here, go patrol.’ We look at recent crime stats, and we work off of those crime stats. So if we have hotspots in those areas say for that month, we focus and concentrate our efforts around those hotspots.”

The SEAL officers also don’t “receive the same protection, as we are in the private sector,” according to Alexander. He argues that leads to better accountability because they have to worry about keeping their jobs.

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Of course, privatizing police forces has raised concerns as well. The Washington Post reports:

The growth is mirrored nationally in the ranks of private police, who increasingly patrol corporate campuses, neighborhoods and museums as the demand for private security has increased and police services have been cut in some places.

The trend has raised concerns in Virginia and elsewhere, because these armed officers often receive a small fraction of the training and oversight of their municipal counterparts. Arrests of private police officers and incidents involving SCOPs overstepping their authority have also raised concerns.

Do you think privatizing police forces is a good idea?

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Illegal Alien Prison Riot In Texas Called A ‘Demonstration’ By Local News Outlet

Texas News Outlet Calls Illegal Alien Prison Riot A ‘Demonstration’ – Breitbart

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According to a Texas border television station, when about 2,000 illegal aliens engage in a mass riot, yelling, overturning tents, and setting fires, it is only a “demonstration.”

“Approximately 2,000 federal inmates were involved in a demonstration at a prison facility in Willacy County,” begins the report by television station KGBT.

The riot took place on Friday at a private prison facility in the city of Raymondville, about 40 miles north of the Texas border with Mexico, as Breitbart Texas reported. The private facility is under contract with the U.S. Bureau of Prisons and holds primarily illegal aliens, as well as other inmates facing federal charges. The facility can hold a total of around 2,900 detainees.

In their reporting of the riot, KGBT gave a detailed report about the massive mobilization needed to quell the rioters and mentioned that three local schools had been placed on lockdown as a response to the “demonstration.”

“Multiple agencies, including federal and state authorities, were called to secure the perimeter of the Willacy County Correctional Center, a privately owned prison contracted through the federal government,” KGBT staff reported.

The station then provided a detailed account of the rioting.

“Some inmates broke out of the housing area and made their way into the recreational yard prompting a lockdown of the prison. Some inmates were seen shaking the fence. Tear gas was used in an attempt to break up the disturbance… Small fires broke out in three of the units, and the Raymondville Fire Department is on scene for precautionary measures,” KGBT reported.

While the story is a chilling account of events, KGBT chose to minimize the seriousness of the situation by calling it a “demonstration,” rather than a prison riot by illegal aliens.

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Texas Governor Abbott Declares February 2nd To Be Chris Kyle Day

Texas Governor Declares ‘Chris Kyle Day’ – Breitbart

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Texas Governor Greg Abbott declared February 2nd to be “Chris Kyle Day” to honor the Texan who became known the most lethal sniper in American history. Kyle was also recently immortalized in the blockbuster film “American Sniper.”

Kyle was credited with 150 sniper kills during his four tours of duty in Iraq as a Navy Seal. He was tragically shot and killed on February 2, 2013, while trying to help a fellow veteran who was allegedly suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Taya Kyle, the widow of Chris Kyle, was recently honored by the organization AmericanSnipers.org with a donation of $62,000. According to a Breitbart News article by AWR Hawkins, the group raised the money by raffling a McMillan .338 Lapua sniper rifle. She also recently made news by shooting an antelope on a hunting trip taken to honor her late husband.

After his death, Kyle was honored with a memorial service in the Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. The service along with the miles-long funeral procession were also featured in the movie honoring Kyle.

During that service, then Governor Rick Perry said, “Chris Kyle was the public face of an anonymous breed of American warrior who are handed the hardest missions and assume the largest risks,” Former Governor Rick Perry said. “Chris was among the very best at what he did, and he saved countless American lives in the process. Our state and our nation suffered a profound loss with his passing. I am honored to have known Chris and to have called him my friend. Anita and I send our deepest condolences to his wife, Taya, his children and the thousands of service members that were his extended family.”

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Texas Woman Gets 10 Years For Keeping Father’s Corpse In Storage, Collecting His Social Security For Decades

Woman Kept Father’s Mummified Corpse In Storage, Collected His Social Security For Two Decades – Washington Free Beacon

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A Texas woman was sentenced to 10 years in prison after stealing her father’s Social Security benefits for two decades as she kept his mummified corpse in a storage unit along with his car.

Judith Maria Broughton forged her father’s signature and had more $245,226 of his retirement benefits deposited into a joint banking account, after he died in 1990. His body was rotting in a storage unit she leased in Kentucky until it was discovered in January.

From the Social Security Administration’s Office of Inspector General:

On July 3, 2014, Broughton pleaded guilty to a one count Information charging her with willfully and knowingly stealing Social Security Administration Retirement Insurance Benefits. By pleading guilty, Broughton admitted that she forged her father’s signature causing SSA benefits paid in the name of her father, Luther D. Broughton, to be electronically deposited into a joint checking account. From June 1990 to August 2011, she collected the funds deposited into the account even after his death. Broughton further admitted to converting those monies to her own personal use.

According to court records, Luther Broughton died in June 1990 and the defendant leased a storage unit in Lexington, KY, to conceal his death. A search of the storage unit on January 8, 2014, revealed the mummified remains of Luther D. Broughton as well as his personal belongings including an automobile. Also, the defendant’s mother, Mary Elizabeth Broughton’s, Social Security benefits were being electronically deposited into a joint checking account with the defendant. Mary Elizabeth Broughton’s whereabouts have not been determined and her SSA benefits have been suspended.

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Supreme Court Upholds Texas Voter ID Law

Supreme Court Allows Texas Use Of New Voter ID Law – Wall Street Journal

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The U.S. Supreme Court on Saturday allowed Texas to enforce its voter identification law for the Nov. 4 midterm elections, denying emergency requests from the Obama administration and other challengers who said the law harmed minority voting rights.

The high court’s move, announced in an early morning order, is a setback for civil-rights advocates and marks the court’s fourth recent action on a state’s election procedures just ahead of Election Day.

A federal judge in Texas last week struck down the state law after holding a trial on the issue and concluding lawmakers acted with discriminatory intent when they enacted the law in 2011.

Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos said the Texas law was the strictest in the country for several reasons, including because it allowed the fewest forms of acceptable photo identification and didn’t make certain accommodations for the poor and the elderly.

The judge said more than half a million registered voters, many of them black or Hispanic, were expected to lack the ID necessary to vote in person at the polls.

This week the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, acting on an emergency appeal by state officials, decided Texas could use the voter ID law for this election. The appeals court said the state already had been training poll workers to apply the voter ID law and said it was too late to change the rules so close to the date when voters were due to begin casting ballots. Early voting in Texas begins Monday.

The appeals court said it was guided in part by recent Supreme Court emergency actions on election rules in Ohio, North Carolina and Wisconsin. The results in those cases pointed in different directions, but in each case the justices blocked late changes to state election procedures, seemingly out of concern for voter confusion. The high court didn’t offer an explanation for its course of action in those cases.

The same held true Saturday when a majority of the court issued a brief written order that allowed Texas to use its voter ID law. But three justices – Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan – dissented, saying the court should have intervened.

“The greatest threat to public confidence in elections in this case is the prospect of enforcing a purposefully discriminatory law, one that likely imposes an unconstitutional poll tax and risks denying the right to vote to hundreds of thousands of eligible voters,” Justice Ginsburg wrote for the dissenters.

The Justice Department and civil rights groups had filed emergency appeals with the Supreme Court, saying there was no justification for allowing Texas to use the voter ID law after a judge found it to be discriminatory.

Texas said in court papers that its law wasn’t discriminatory and was approved to deter and detect voter fraud. The state also disputed the trial judge’s finding that large numbers of voters could be disenfranchised, saying it had taken extensive steps to mitigate “the already minor inconveniences associated with securing photo identification.”

The Supreme Court action Saturday wasn’t a ruling on the legality of the Texas law. The court was considering only whether the law could be applied while Texas appealed the trial judge’s ruling.

With the high court’s action in favor of Texas, three of the court’s four recent emergency actions in election matters have favored the states. The court also allowed Ohio to cut back on early voting and let North Carolina prohibit same-day voter registration and out-of-precinct voting. In a win for civil rights advocates, the court blocked Wisconsin from enforcing its voter ID law for the midterms.

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Thanks Barack… Third Person Diagnosed With Ebola In Texas

Second Health Care Worker In Texas Tests Positive For Ebola – The Blaze

A second health care worker tested positive for Ebola late Tuesday, the Texas Department of Health said in a statement early Wednesday morning.

The unidentified worker reported a fever late Tuesday and was immediately isolated at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas. The individual was among those who helped care for Thomas Eric Duncan, the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the U.S.

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Officials at a press conference Wednesday morning said this health worker ”preliminarily tested positive for Ebola.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will conduct an additional test for absolute confirmation that the individual has the virus.

“Like Nina Pham, this is a heroic person, a person who has dedicated her life… to serving others,” Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said at the press conference, making a nod to the nurse diagnosed with Ebola Sunday after caring for Duncan. ” This is a person is dealing with this diagnosis with the grit and grace and determination like Nina has dealt with this diagnosis.”

Officials said that they have interviewed the health worker and identified others who she may have come into contact with while monitoring herself for any symptoms. Early Wednesday morning as people were waking up, officials were at the apartment building where this nurse lived, knocking on doors to alert them to the situation. This woman lived alone and did not have any pets, officials said.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said at the press conference that “phase one” of decontamination of any common areas and areas outside the apartment have already taken place. He added that he expected “phase two” – the internal cleaning of her apartment and car – to be complete by this afternoon.

With this second infected health care worker and 75 others who had cared for Duncan still being monitored, Rawlings warned that “it may get worse before it gets better.”

“I think there are two things that I hearken back to this: The only way that we were going to beat this is person by person, moment by moment, detail by detail,” he said. “The second is we want to minimize rumors and maximize facts. We want to deal with facts, not fear.”

On Sunday, officials announced that Pham was diagnosed with Ebola, though it was unclear exactly how she contracted the virus. Officials said on Tuesday that she was in good condition.

When asked about this issue of how health care workers were exposed to the virus when taking precautions with protective gear and other procedures, Dr. Daniel Varga with Texas Health Presbyterian said they are “looking at every element” that could have led to these new infections.

“I don’t think we have a systematic institutional problem,” Varga said. “We’re looking at every element of our personal protective equipment and infection control inside the hospital. We don’t have an answer for this right now but we’re looking at every possible element.”

However, the fact that this second person was in isolation within 90 minutes of taking her temperature and seeing she had a fever is “continued evidence that our monitoring program is working,” Varga said.

Judge Jenkins added more about this monitoring program later in the news conference.

“What this case further illustrates… is Ebola comes from [contact with] body fluids of a symptomatic Ebola victim. That’s how [two health care workers] contracted the disease and that’s how Eric Duncan contracted the disease,” he said.

While Jenkins said that they are not going to set up “protective orders” for the 75 other health care workers being monitored, they are setting up a place where “if they want to be away from their families, they can choose to do so.”

The 48 other people that Duncan had contact with who were not health care workers are nearing the end of the 21-day monitoring program and are asymptomatic, according to health officials.

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